Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm trying to commit the right files in git, but having problems configuring my gitignore properly. I followed the instructions here to create the gitignore file (django project):

# File types #
##############
*.pyc
*.swo
*.swp
*.swn

# Directories #
###############
logs/

# Specific files #
##################
projectname/settings.py

# OS generated files #
######################
.DS_Store
ehthumbs.db
Icon
Thumbs.db
*~

The problem is that settings.py is getting included in the commit:

Admin$ git add .
Admin$ git status
# On branch master
# Changes to be committed:
#   (use "git reset HEAD <file>..." to unstage)
#
#   modified:   projectname/settings.py

How can I ignore settings in my gitignore?

share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of .gitignore file not ignoring –  Enrico Oct 29 '13 at 18:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It looks like you already have settings.py under version control by git. In this case git will continue to track the file - no matter what you write in .gitignore.

You have to explicitly tell git to forget about settings.py:

  1. Add it to .gitignore (As you did)
  2. Remove the file from git without deleting the file: git rm --cached projectname/settings.py
  3. Commit the change: git commit -m "remove settings.py"

Afterwards git will ignore the file. But be aware that versions which are already commited will stay in your repository.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok well what should I do to fix it so that the settings isn't included in the future? –  Nick B Oct 29 '13 at 18:47
    
It' won't be included anymore. Your .gitignore looks good. –  Scolytus Oct 29 '13 at 18:49
1  
This is probably the correct answer, people often misunderstand this. If the file is already versioned git will keep tracking it even if there is a match for it on .gitignore; you have to manually remove it, and then, now, git will ignore it. –  talles Oct 29 '13 at 20:20
    
@talles, there is another way, without removing it ... git update-index --assume-unchanged path/to/file –  Markku K. Oct 29 '13 at 20:51
    
If you want to remove the file in a commit but not in the current directory: cp file tmp; git rm file; git commit ...; mv tmp file is the hard way :-) and the easy way is git rm --cached file. –  torek Oct 29 '13 at 21:34

Try adding / before your directory

# Specific files #
##################
/projectname/settings.py

For any further information,

$ mkdir git_test
$ cd git_test/
~/git_test $ git init
Initialized empty Git repository in /home/linux/git_test/.git/
~/git_test $ touch .gitignore
~/git_test $ vim .gitignore
~/git_test $ cat .gitignore 
/aa/aa.py

~/git_test $ mkdir aa
~/git_test $ touch aa/aa.py
~/git_test $ 
~/git_test $ 
~/git_test $ git status
# On branch master
#
# Initial commit
#
# Untracked files:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to include in what will be committed)
#
#   .gitignore
nothing added to commit but untracked files present (use "git add" to track)

If you still facing the same issue:

https://help.github.com/articles/ignoring-files

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the idea, but unfortunately it is still being included in the commit. Any ideas about how to fix this? Thanks! –  Nick B Oct 29 '13 at 18:47
    
see this post: stackoverflow.com/questions/11508445/… –  Siva Cn Oct 29 '13 at 18:50

For a file that is already versioned, the GitHub help page suggests using git update-index --assume-unchanged projectname/settings.py, rather than .gitignore.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.