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I'm trying to implement a function that receives a c string as input, converts all lowercase characters to uppercase, then stores the result in the output parameter. Here is the code for this function:

void makeUpper( const unsigned char* input, unsigned char* output ) 
{

    int inputLength = strlen((char*)input);
    int outputLength = strlen((char*)output);

    for (int i = 0; i < inputLength; i++)
    {
        if ((input[i] >= 97) && (input[i] <= 122))
        {
            output[i] = input[i] - 32;
        }
        else
        {
            output[i] = input[i];
        }
    }

}

Now, a problem will clearly arise in the case that inputLength > outputLength. To remedy this, I inserted a the following code between the inputLength & outputLength declarations and for loop.

if (inputLength > outputLength)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < (inputLength - outputLength); i++)
    {
        strcat((char*)output, " ");
    }
}

Not only is this producing an error (this function or variable may be unsafe...), but I'm almost certain that I'm going about this the wrong way. However, I cannot think of any alternatives.

EDIT:

The main function I am using is as follows:

int main() 
{

  unsigned char in[] = "HELLO aaaaaaaaaa 678";
  unsigned char out[] = "                    xxxxxxxxx";

  makeUpper( in, out );
  cout << in << " -> " << out << endl;
  makeUpper( out, in );
  cout << out << " -> " << in << endl;

 return 0;

}

What I the function should print is:

HELLO aaaaaaaaaa 678 -> HELLO AAAAAAAAAA 678xxxxxxxxx
HELLO AAAAAAAAAA 678xxxxxxxxx -> HELLO AAAAAAAAAA 678XXXXXXXXX
share|improve this question
    
Is the buffer supposed to be passed in by consumers of the function, or can you malloc the buffer yourself? – Ian McLaird Oct 29 '13 at 21:08
    
@IanMcLaird: strncat() is as lethal as strcat(), primarily because you have to know how much data is already stored in the target string to be able to specify the length correctly, but if you know that, you barely need to use a *cat() function at all. – Jonathan Leffler Oct 29 '13 at 21:26
    
You either need to assume that there's enough space in the target string (simpler) or you have to pass the length of the target string to the function as an argument. – Jonathan Leffler Oct 29 '13 at 21:27
    
@JonathanLeffler, you're absolutely right, and I've deleted my earlier comment (I hope) before anybody takes it as good advice. – Ian McLaird Oct 30 '13 at 14:16
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are confusing the "present contents of the output parameter" with "available space". The former is irrelevant, and the only information you have about the latter is "there is at least this much space available".

Now it will depend on how the space for output was assigned in the first place. If you did something like

char output[100];
strcpy(output, "hello");

You would end up with space for 100 characters, but only 6 (5+1) actually used. You could therefore take the string "ThiS IS a STRING" and process it with your function, without problem.

But this is not safe, because you don't know how much space there is. The following approach would be better:

char *output;
output = malloc(100);

Now change your function prototype to

void makeUpper( const unsigned char* input, unsigned char** output ) 

and in your function, you do

inputLength = strlen(input);
*output = realloc(*output, inputLength + 1);

This will make sure that enough space is allocated for the output. Or you could return the value in the input vector - you already know there is enough space there...

EDIT In the example you give, there is enough space in the output; the question simply becomes one of "safely copying" the (uppercased) input to the output. In which case your function can look like this:

void makeUpper( const unsigned char* input, unsigned char* output ) 
{

    int inputLength = strlen(input);
    int outputLength = strlen(output);
    int ii;
    for (ii = 0; ii < inputLength; ii++)
    {
        output[ii] = toupper(input[ii]);
    }
    if(outputLength < inputLength) output[ii] = '\0';
}

The final line is there to make sure that if you increased the length of output (again, assuming this was memory you could validly access), then you still need to make sure there's a terminating nul character at the end of the string. In your example, you want the "rest of the output string" to still be there when the input is shorter than the output, so you need the if condition.

In general - if you do not know for sure that output is big enough, there is no way to make it bigger without having access to the address of the pointer - sometimes called the "handle".

share|improve this answer
    
Any way to do this without altering the prototype? – Will Oct 30 '13 at 0:48
    
Not really; but I did update my answer a bit more. – Floris Oct 30 '13 at 2:02
    
Another question, when I run the program everything prints correctly, however, an error is produced: "Stack around the variable 'in' was corrupted." Is this because more characters are being stored in in[] than were originally allocated? – Will Oct 30 '13 at 20:32
    
When you make the second call and copy out back to in, you are indeed exceeding the available space in in, and may end up overwriting parts of out (Although what gets corrupted depends on how the compiler chooses to allocate the stack - there are no fixed rules). So yes - "don't do it"! – Floris Oct 30 '13 at 21:23

If the output buffer can be assumed to be created within the function:

// C++ version
void makeUpper(const unsigned char* input, unsigned char*& output)
{
    // assume output = null
    int inputLength = strlen((const char*)input);
    output = new unsigned char[inputLength + 1];
    memset(output, 0, inputLength + 1); // initialize the array to 0's

    for (int i = 0; i < inputLength; i++)
    {
        output[i] = ::toupper(input[i]); // why reinvent the wheel
    }
}

// C version
void makeUpper(const unsigned char* input, unsigned char** output) 
{
    // assume output = null
    int inputLength = strlen((const char*)input);
    *output = (unsigned char*)malloc((inputLength + 1) * sizeof(unsigned char));
    memset(*output, 0, (inputLength + 1) * sizeof(unsigned char)); // initialize the array to 0's

    for (int i = 0; i < inputLength; i++)
    {
        (*output)[i] = ::toupper(input[i]);
    }
}

output would need to be deleted/freed by whoever takes control of it.

If you do not want to properly size output inside the function:

void makeUpper(const unsigned char* input, unsigned char* output, unsigned int output_size) 
{
    // assume output != null, the current contents of output are irrelevant - you need it's size
    int inputLength = strlen((const char*)input);
    int maxLength = (inputLength < output_size - 1 ? inputLength : output_size - 1);
    memset(output, 0, output_size); // clear output

    for (int i = 0; i < maxLength; i++)
    {
        output[i] = ::toupper(input[i]); // why reinvent the wheel
    }
}

NOTE: The C++ tag was removed while I was writing my answer. This really only affects the first solution (as you would use malloc instead of new). I would shy away from realloc or calloc unless your requirements absolutely necessitate them.

share|improve this answer
    
You can't use references in a C solution either - affecting your first solution a little more. – Jonathan Leffler Oct 29 '13 at 21:25
    
Hence the double-pointer comment below it. For clarity, I split it up into a C++ and C version. – Zac Howland Oct 29 '13 at 21:30

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