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I have the following bit of code in Objective-C to turn an amount of seconds (int) into a date string of form "x hours y minutes z seconds". For 8812 seconds it should return 2 hours 26 minutes 52 seconds, but it's returning 2 hours 26 minutes 51 seconds.

This is the line that's troublesome:

float timeInSeconds = (60 * ((((seconds / 3600.0) - (seconds / 3600)) * 60.0) - (int)(((seconds / 3600.0) - (seconds / 3600)) * 60.0)));

This results in 52.0 if I NSLog it. However if I do:

int timeInSeconds = (int)(60 * ((((seconds / 3600.0) - (seconds / 3600)) * 60.0) - (int)(((seconds / 3600.0) - (seconds / 3600)) * 60.0)));

I get 51 when I NSLog it. Why is that exactly?

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2  
It wasn't actually 52.0 - it was 51.99999999 (or some such) and got truncated. Classical problem of floating point math. –  Floris Oct 29 '13 at 22:18
    
How would I best deal with that then? –  Doug Smith Oct 29 '13 at 22:19
1  
Use a call to roundf. –  Richard J. Ross III Oct 29 '13 at 22:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The following code converts a time interval to hours/minutes/seconds without using floating point numbers, and therefore without rounding problems or precision loss:

int numberOfSeconds = 8812; // Your value as an example

int tmp = numberOfSeconds; 
int seconds = tmp % 60;
tmp /= 60;
int minutes = tmp % 60;
tmp /= 60;
int hours = tmp;

NSLog(@"%d:%02d:%02d", hours, minutes, seconds);
// Output: 2:26:52
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