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I am writing a C++ data conversion program which is copying data from an ODBC data source into an Oracle database. Have chosen C++ (with array operations) due to the very high volume of data to move (billions of rows).

Now the text columns are "supposed" to be UTF-8, but this is not always the case. When its not I still want to copy the invalid raw bytes into Oracle. We will clean them up later. The column is a simple VARCHAR2(100), so 100 bytes long. But Oracle appears to be attempting some sort of UTF-8 parsing/processing on the data.

For example the following string (has been truncated to 100 bytes, thus invalid):

Hex Bytes: 46 46 54 F0 9F 98 84 F0 9F 98 88 F0 9F 98 94 F0 9F 98 85 F0 9F 98 90 F0 9F 98 88 F0 9F 98 94 F0 9F 98 88 F0 9F 98 85 F0 9F 98 94 F0 9F 98 86 F0 9F 98 94 F0 9F 98 85 F0 9F 98 90 F0 9F 98 90 F0 9F 98 86 F0 9F 98 90 F0 9F 98 90 F0 9F 98 87 F0 9F 98 90 F0 9F 98 92 F0 9F 98 88 F0 9F 98 9A F0 9F 98 88 F0

http://tinyurl.com/nhhkf62

Is actually being inserted into the database as:

Hex Bytes: 46 46 54 EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD EF BF BD

http://tinyurl.com/orkv6z6

Which is basically the leading 3 ascii chars followed by the UTF-8 encoding of U+FFFD for each of the subsequent bytes.

Other details:

Oracle Version: 11g Enterprise Edition Release 11.2.0.1.0
Oracle Client: oracle-instantclient11.2-basic-11.2.0.3.0-1
Oracle OCI rpm: oracle-instantclient11.2-devel-11.2.0.3.0-1
Environment: LANG=en_US.UTF-8
Environment: NLS_CHARACTERSET=AMERICAN_AMERICA.UTF8
Environment: NLS_LANG=AMERICAN.UTF8

So does anyone know why Oracle and/or OCI is modifying this data? And is there a way to stop it from happenning?

Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
What is the database character set? If you want to store the bytes without worrying about character set conversion taking place, you really ought to store the data in a RAW(100) column, not VARCHAR2(100). Is that an option? –  Justin Cave Oct 30 '13 at 3:02
3  
They are not invalid UTF-8 characters but bytes that do not constitute valid UTF-8 representation of anything. It is correct, by the Unicode standard, to replace such data by U+FFFD REPLACEMENT CHARACTER when reading data as UTF-8. So if you don’t want that, you must not read it that way but as raw binary data. –  Jukka K. Korpela Oct 30 '13 at 5:05
    
Unfortunately I don't think raw is an option, would put things elsewhere at risk. The problem is not on read, its on insert. The bytes in the "before" are dumped from the memory buffer right before the OCIStmtExecute of the insert. The bytes in the "after" are extracted form the db using dump( colname, 16 ). –  Sodved Oct 30 '13 at 5:51
2  
Agree with @JukkaK.Korpela. Oracle, like all quality databases is very careful about data integrity. A Unicode string must be in Unicode, for instance. Your idea to store raw bytes (invalid Unicode) in a Unicode string is an explicit violation of that data integrity. If you don't want data integrity, don't use a database. –  MSalters Oct 30 '13 at 8:40
    
The character set in the DB is AL32UTF8. Your points are very valid, but I have my requirements. I have not seen this implicit conversion happen before when using a perl client? Maybe I am messing something else up somewhere... –  Sodved Oct 30 '13 at 23:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

NLS_LANG is most important for implicit character conversion. I think it should be NLS_LANG=AMERICAN_AMERICA.UTF8 instead of NLS_LANG=AMERICAN.UTF8

What is your database character set?

share|improve this answer
    
Close, I had to match the character set of the database exactly. So I set NLS_LANG=AMERICAN.AL32UTF8 and it all worked. Thanks for pointing me in the right direction –  Sodved Oct 31 '13 at 0:29
    
ah ok. AL32UTF8 is the newer version, allowing for more (all?) characters. –  HAL 9000 Oct 31 '13 at 4:44

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