Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

By guarantee I mean the commonly understood feature of TCP that if a packet gets damaged or lost, then it will go unacknowledged and be resent.

Consider the situation (in java) where the sender sends some data, and immediately closes the socket. If that data goes missing or corrupts itself en-route, will the reciever never be able to get it? Or does the senders socket wait and not actually close until all of the appropriate ACKs have been read back in?

I've tried tracing the socket.close() method back myself, but its hard as not only are there are many internal socket implementations but the functionality splits down several paths with ambiguous method names.

share|improve this question
1  
Anything sent should be received. The OS should keep the socket open until the last segment is acknowledged from the client. Sockets are mostly handled by the OS, java interfaces into the OS so you will probably not find the code you are looking for anyway. –  BevynQ Oct 30 '13 at 2:50
    
Thanks, please enter that as an answer and I will accept. –  Numeron Oct 30 '13 at 2:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Most resource management happens at the OS level below the JVM.

In the case the of TCP protocol it is completely managed by the OS what happens is

Application tells JVM to send data on TCP Stream
JVM access OS functions to perform data send task.
OS manages TCP protocol.
data gets sent over the network.

The data gets copied out of the JVM into the OS memory space so even if the JVM aborted the TCP contracts should still be handled appropriately.

If the JVM halts or requests the OS to close the socket it should hold the socket open until the other endpoint acknowledges all data has arrived or the other endpoint closes.

As the JVM only interfaces into the OS you won't see this management code in the Java libraries, they assume that management is handled correctly by the OS and the JVM.

share|improve this answer

Consider the situation (in java) where the sender sends some data, and immediately closes the socket. If that data goes missing or corrupts itself en-route, will the reciever never be able to get it?

TCP will retransmit, at least until its retry timers or counters expire, after which it would give up and rest the connection.

Or does the senders socket wait and not actually close until all of the appropriate ACKs have been read back in?

Yes. This takes place in TCP, not Java.

share|improve this answer

You should use Socket.shutdownOutput() and then wait for the closing event, as if the remote host closed the connection. This method is a wrapper on the shutdown() C socket function, which accepts a parameter to decide wich network flow to close.

share|improve this answer
    
True if the sending application needs to know the data has been received, but doesn't actually answer the question. –  EJP Oct 30 '13 at 3:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.