Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
void execute_command_pipe(char * command_from, char * command_to, char ** args_from, char ** args_to) {
    pipe(pipefd);

    int pid = fork();
    close(pipefd[0]);
    if (pid == 0) {
        //close(STDOUT_FILENO);
        dup2(pipefd[1], STDOUT_FILENO);
        int rv1 = execv(get_contain_dir(command_from), args_from);
        close(pipefd[1]);
    } else {
        close(pipefd[1]);
        dup2(pipefd[0], STDIN_FILENO);
        int rv2 = execv(get_contain_dir(command_to), args_to);
        close(pipefd[0]);
    }
}

for example, if I wanted to do the equivalent of ls | grep test, the parent thread would run grep listening for input on STDIN, and the child thread would write the output of ls to STDTOUT.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Is using low-level pipe/fork is necessary? If no - more easy way - to use popen/pclose system calls.

For your example with ls | grep, this is:

FILE *f = popen("ls");
char buf[1000];
while(fgets(buf, sizeof(buf), f) 
  call_my_grep(buf);
pclose(f);

This is easy and efficient.

share|improve this answer
    
yeah I need to use pipe and fork. –  Tyler Sebastian Oct 30 '13 at 3:29
void execute_command_pipe(char * command_from, char * command_to, char ** args_from, char ** args_to) {
    pipe(pipefd);

    int pid = fork();
    if (pid != 0) {
        dup2(pipefd[0], STDIN_FILENO);
        close(pipefd[0]);
        int rv2 = execv(get_contain_dir(command_to), args_to);
    } else {
        dup2(pipefd[1], STDOUT_FILENO);
        close(pipefd[1]);
        int rv1 = execv(get_contain_dir(command_from), args_from);
        close(pipefd[0]);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.