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I have code like this:

class RetInterface {...}

class Ret1: public RetInterface {...}

class AInterface
{
  public:
     virtual boost::shared_ptr<RetInterface> get_r() const = 0;
     ...
};

class A1: public AInterface
{
  public:
     boost::shared_ptr<Ret1> get_r() const {...}
     ...
};

This code does not compile. In visual studio it raises "C2555: overriding virtual function return type differs and is not covariant". If I do not use boost::shared_ptr but return raw pointers, the code compiles (I understand this is due to covariant return types in C++). I can see the problem is because boost::shared_ptr of Ret1 is not derived from boost::shared_ptr of RetInterface. But I want to return boost::shared_ptr of Ret1 for use in other classes, else I must cast the returned value after the return.

  1. Am I doing something wrong?
  2. If not, why is the language like this - it should be extensible to handle conversion between smart pointers in this scenario? Is there a desirable workaround?
share|improve this question
    
IF you don't use boost::shared_ptr, do you return pointers? Is it managed C++? – Lev Oct 13 '08 at 5:11
    
@Lev If I try returning raw pointers the code compiles, but then there is a memory management problem. No, I am not using managed C++. – phaedrus Oct 13 '08 at 5:14
    
What I do is: return raw pointers but document that the caller is responsible for wrapping the pointer in a smart pointer, e.g. std::unique_ptr<Class>(obj.clone()). – quant_dev Nov 15 '15 at 0:25
up vote 14 down vote accepted

Firstly, this is indeed how it works in C++: the return type of a virtual function in a derived class must be the same as in the base class. There is the special exception that a function that returns a reference/pointer to some class X can be overridden by a function that returns a reference/pointer to a class that derives from X, but as you note this doesn't allow for smart pointers (such as shared_ptr), just for plain pointers.

If your interface RetInterface is sufficiently comprehensive, then you won't need to know the actual returned type in the calling code. In general it doesn't make sense anyway: the reason get_r is a virtual function in the first place is because you will be calling it through a pointer or reference to the base class AInterface, in which case you can't know what type the derived class would return. If you are calling this with an actual A1 reference, you can just create a separate get_r1 function in A1 that does what you need.

class A1: public AInterface
{
  public:
     boost::shared_ptr<RetInterface> get_r() const
     {
         return get_r1();
     }
     boost::shared_ptr<Ret1> get_r1() const {...}
     ...
};

Alternatively, you can use the visitor pattern or something like my Dynamic Double Dispatch technique to pass a callback in to the returned object which can then invoke the callback with the correct type.

share|improve this answer
    
Will boost::shared_ptr<Ret1> automatically get converted to boost::shared_ptr<RetInterface>? Don't you need at least something like boost::static_pointer_cast? – h9uest Mar 11 '15 at 11:53
3  
Return the pointer to derived class makes sense with clone methods on classes implementing multiple interfaces. – quant_dev Nov 15 '15 at 0:26

This question was asked a long time ago, but no one gave a very good answer. See http://lists.boost.org/boost-users/2007/11/31932.php for how to actually get what you want.

share|improve this answer
    
All this makes me think whether the heavy machinery and constraints of shared_ptr is worth it. My current position is to avoid shared_ptr as far as possible, in favor of ptr_containers. I've to still need to try intrusive reference counters. – phaedrus Jan 21 '10 at 5:33
2  
@phaedrus, I hope you don't avoid shared_ptr in favor of plain old pointers, though. – Daniel Albuschat Jul 15 '14 at 10:51
1  
@DanielAlbuschat Yes, I don't favor plain old pointers. – phaedrus Jul 28 '14 at 14:12

What about this solution:

template<typename Derived, typename Base>
class SharedCovariant : public shared_ptr<Base>
{
public:

typedef Base BaseOf;

SharedCovariant(shared_ptr<Base> & container) :
    shared_ptr<Base>(container)
{
}

shared_ptr<Derived> operator ->()
{
    return boost::dynamic_pointer_cast<Derived>(*this);
}
};

e.g:

struct A {};

struct B : A {};

struct Test
{
    shared_ptr<A> get() {return a_; }

    shared_ptr<A> a_;
};

typedef SharedCovariant<B,A> SharedBFromA;

struct TestDerived : Test
{
    SharedBFromA get() { return a_; }
};
share|improve this answer
    
You didn't use virtual? – phaedrus Apr 18 '13 at 15:10

Here is my attempt :

template<class T>
class Child : public T
{
public:
    typedef T Parent;
};

template<typename _T>
class has_parent
{
private:
    typedef char                        One;
    typedef struct { char array[2]; }   Two;

    template<typename _C>
    static One test(typename _C::Parent *);
    template<typename _C>
    static Two test(...);

public:
    enum { value = (sizeof(test<_T>(nullptr)) == sizeof(One)) };
};

class A
{
public :
   virtual void print() = 0;
};

class B : public Child<A>
{
public:
   void print() override
   {
       printf("toto \n");
   }
};

template<class T, bool hasParent = has_parent<T>::value>
class ICovariantSharedPtr;

template<class T>
class ICovariantSharedPtr<T, true> : public ICovariantSharedPtr<typename T::Parent>
{
public:
   T * get() override = 0;
};

template<class T>
class ICovariantSharedPtr<T, false>
{
public:
    virtual T * get() = 0;
};

template<class T>
class CovariantSharedPtr : public ICovariantSharedPtr<T>
{
public:
    CovariantSharedPtr(){}

    CovariantSharedPtr(std::shared_ptr<T> a_ptr) : m_ptr(std::move(a_ptr)){}

    T * get() final
   {
        return m_ptr.get();
   }
private:
    std::shared_ptr<T> m_ptr;
};

And a little example :

class UseA
{
public:
    virtual ICovariantSharedPtr<A> & GetPtr() = 0;
};

class UseB : public UseA
{
public:
    CovariantSharedPtr<B> & GetPtr() final
    {
        return m_ptrB;
    }
private:
    CovariantSharedPtr<B> m_ptrB = std::make_shared<B>();
};

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    UseB b;
    UseA & a = b;
    a.GetPtr().get()->print();
}

Explanations :

This solution implies meta-progamming and to modify the classes used in covariant smart pointers.

The simple template struct Child is here to bind the type Parent and inheritance. Any class inheriting from Child<T> will inherit from T and define T as Parent. The classes used in covariant smart pointers needs this type to be defined.

The class has_parent is used to detect at compile time if a class defines the type Parent or not. This part is not mine, I used the same code as to detect if a method exists (see here)

As we want covariance with smart pointers, we want our smart pointers to mimic the existing class architecture. It's easier to explain how it works in the example.

When a CovariantSharedPtr<B> is defined, it inherits from ICovariantSharedPtr<B>, which is interpreted as ICovariantSharedPtr<B, has_parent<B>::value>. As B inherits from Child<A>, has_parent<B>::value is true, so ICovariantSharedPtr<B> is ICovariantSharedPtr<B, true> and inherits from ICovariantSharedPtr<B::Parent> which is ICovariantSharedPtr<A>. As A has no Parent defined, has_parent<A>::value is false, ICovariantSharedPtr<A> is ICovariantSharedPtr<A, false> and inherits from nothing.

The main point is as Binherits from A, we have ICovariantSharedPtr<B>inheriting from ICovariantSharedPtr<A>. So any method returning a pointer or a reference on ICovariantSharedPtr<A> can be overloaded by a method returning the same on ICovariantSharedPtr<B>.

share|improve this answer
    
What about adding some rationale and explanation for those with little time to decipher this? How does it compare to morabot's? Merci. – Quartz Apr 8 at 14:20

You can't change return types (for non-pointer, non-reference return types) when overloading methods in C++. A1::get_r must return a boost::shared_ptr<RetInterface>.

Anthony Williams has a nice comprehensive answer.

share|improve this answer

Mr Fooz answered part 1 of your question. Part 2, it works this way because the compiler doesn't know if it will be calling AInterface::get_r or A1::get_r at compile time - it needs to know what return value it's going to get, so it insists on both methods returning the same type. This is part of the C++ specification.

For the workaround, if A1::get_r returns a pointer to RetInterface, the virtual methods in RetInterface will still work as expected, and the proper object will be deleted when the pointer is destroyed. There's no need for different return types.

share|improve this answer

maybe you could use an out parameter to get around "covariance with returned boost shared_ptrs.

 void get_r_to(boost::shared_ptr<RetInterface>& ) ...

since I suspect a caller can drop in a more refined shared_ptr type as argument.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately no. – quant_dev Nov 4 '15 at 8:41

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