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tic tac toe problem.

 a=0
 def runx():
    answer = int(input("answer:"))
    if answer == 1:
        if a==1 or a==2:
             print("nope")
        if a==0:
             mlabel=Label(mGui,text="x").grid(row=1,column=1)
             a=1

so runx is checking to see where on the board you want to place the x. answer is the variable for where you want it. "a" is to see whether it is occupied and what its occupied with. 0=nothing,1=X,2=O. when i run this it says:

"(a) reference before assignment".

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2  
a = ... anywhere in a Python function declares a as a local, unless you use global or nonlocal –  Eevee Oct 30 '13 at 3:33
    
Does your tictactoe board only have one cell? Probably a should be a list of lists(or a dict). Then you'll just be mutating it, so no need for global there –  John La Rooy Oct 30 '13 at 3:35

3 Answers 3

You are trying to write to a global variable. then, you should place the word global a in the function. like this:

 a=0
 def runx():
    global a
    answer = int(input("answer:"))
    if answer == 1:
        if a==1 or a==2:
             print("nope")
        if a==0:
             mlabel=Label(mGui,text="x").grid(row=1,column=1)
             a=1

I want to mention that as long as you not declare the local variable a, you can always read it from the function, but cannot write unless you put the global keyword.

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Thank You So much!!! its working perfectly now :) –  user2912093 Oct 30 '13 at 3:46
1  
@user2912093 You may want to tick my answer, so other users encounters the problem will know the answer. –  Nirock Oct 30 '13 at 4:11

For small boards it's handy to keep the state in a dict

a = {}
def runx():
    answer = int(input("answer:"))
    row, column = divmod(answer, 3)
    if (row, column) in a:
         print("nope")
    else:
         mlabel=Label(mGui, text="x").grid(row=row, column=column)
         a[row, column] = 1

Because a dict is mutable there's no problem updating it inside a function

Here is how divmod can be used to map a number from 0-8 onto a row/column

>>> for answer in range(0, 9):
...     print divmod(answer, 3)
... 
(0, 0)
(0, 1)
(0, 2)
(1, 0)
(1, 1)
(1, 2)
(2, 0)
(2, 1)
(2, 2)
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You're defining a outside the function, so either use global a inside the function to tell Python it's a global variable, or move the declaration inside the function.

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