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Basically what I would like to do is write a for loop that spawns multiple threads. The threads must call a certain function multiple times. So in other words I need each thread to call the same function on different objects. How can I do this using std::thread c++ library?

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closed as off-topic by Joachim Pileborg, kfsone, Anders K., Ben, Josh Crozier Nov 13 '13 at 21:05

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – Joachim Pileborg, Ben, Josh Crozier
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3  
It would be helpful if you could give some indication of what you've already tried. – kfsone Oct 30 '13 at 6:34
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can simply create threads in a loop, passing different arguments each time. In this example, they are stored in a vector so they can be joined later.

struct Foo {};

void bar(const Foo& f) { .... };

int main()
{
  std::vector<std::thread> threads;
  for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i)
    threads.push_back(std::thread(bar, Foo()));

  // do some other stuff

  // loop again to join the threads
  for (auto& t : threads)
    t.join();
}
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Make a loop, each iteration constructing a separate thread object, all with the same function but different object as argument.

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If you want to use some of C++11 stuff as well as utilize great power of std::function + std::bind you could try something like this:

#include <thread>
#include <functional>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <memory>

typedef std::function<void()> RunningFunction;

class MyRunner 
{
private:
    MyRunner(const MyRunner&);
    MyRunner& operator=(const MyRunner&);
    std::vector<std::thread> _threads;

public:

    MyRunner(uint32_t count, RunningFunction fn) : _threads()
    {
        _threads.reserve(count);
        for (uint32_t i = 0; i < count; ++i)
            _threads.emplace_back(fn);
    }

    void Join()
    {
        for (std::thread& t : _threads)
            if (t.joinable())
                t.join();
    }
};

typedef std::shared_ptr<MyRunner> MyRunnerPtr;

class Foo
{
public:
    void Bar(uint32_t arg)
    {
        std::cout << std::this_thread::get_id() << " arg = " << arg << std::endl;
    }
};


int calcArg()
{
    return rand() % UINT32_MAX;
}

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    std::vector<Foo> objs;

    for (uint32_t i = 0; i < 32; ++i)
        objs.emplace_back(Foo());

    std::vector<MyRunnerPtr> runners;

    for (Foo& obj : objs)
    {
        const uint32_t someArg = calcArg();
        runners.emplace_back(std::make_shared<MyRunner>(1, std::bind(&Foo::Bar, &obj, someArg)));
    }

    for (MyRunnerPtr& runner : runners)
        runner->Join();
}
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