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My friend was setting up a headless server with consumer-grade desktop equipment and he came across this error, which no doubt many people have seen or read about before, but does anyone actually know why it exists?

If there is no keyboard detected or if there is a keyboard controller error, how can you possibly press something to resume?

Was this some kind of easter egg that several BIOS manufacturers adopted or is there a real reason as to why a common default BIOS setting is to not allow the computer to boot if the keyboard is not detected, and then expect the boot process to be resumed by somehow pressing a key?

[example from the Internet]

I mean seriously.

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closed as off-topic by VMai, EdChum, fivedigit, Soner Gönül, greg-449 Sep 12 '14 at 7:47

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I think in more recent BIOS versions, the default is set to "Halt on all errors except keyboard". If your Bios is not too old, at least it should have this option. Only very old ones don't offer any setting for this. –  PMF Oct 30 '13 at 7:49

2 Answers 2

In a lot of cases, the message is a left over from Legacy times.

These days, with PS2 key boards and intelligent controllers it's not possible to swap keyboards without doing a reboot anyway, even most USB ones have to be swapped and then re-powered if a boot error occurs.

However, back in the day when the whole PC revolution started up, keyboards where known as "XT or AT keyboards" (Depending on the style) and most of them had a physical pretty dumb connection.

Also in most of these devices, the keyboard controller itself wasn't really all that smart, first off it was usually actually on the PC main board itself, rather than in the keyboard (as they tend to be today) so the keyboard itself was really pretty dumb, and if an actual physical keyboard fault occurred, then often unplugging it, plugging in a working one and following the instructions got you going.

Hence in many cases, this was something that could actually be obeyed as long as the fault was indeed an actual keyboard fault.

This is an alternative view to that already posted, from the perspective of someone who worked in the early PC repair industry, fixing and building early 286/386 and 486 based PC's as well as trouble shooting them.

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From an implementation standpoint, most BIOS POST routines are structured as follows (POST = Power On Self Test):

InitializeChipset();
if(ErrorDetected()) {
    printf("Chipset error\n");
    HandleError();
}

InitializeMemoryController();
if(ErrorDetected()) {
    printf("Memory error\n");
    HandleError();
}

InitializeKeyboardController();
if(ErrorDetected()) {
    printf("Keyboard not found\n");
    HandleError();
}

InitializeHardDisk();
if(ErrorDetected()) {
    printf("Hard disk error\n");
    HandleError();
}

...

void HandleError() {
    if(UserSettings.WaitForKeyPress) {
        printf("Press F1 to Resume\n");
        getch();
        ...
    }
}

Note this the above code is a HUGE oversimplification of how a BIOS works. Also note the BIOS in your screenshot was written in x86 assembly (doesn't look like an AMI Aptio UEFI).

Basically, if an error is detected, the code jumps to a generic error handler that says "Press F1 to Resume". The behavior of this error handler is appropriate in most cases, except when there is no keyboard attached. It could be better coded, but BIOS engineers can be lazy.

As to why is the missing keyboard considered an error: When the BIOS boots, it tests the system hardware, including the keyboard controller. The keyboard controller test failed because there is no keyboard detected. In your case, the failure was expected, but it could also point to a broken keyboard or motherboard, which would be a bad thing for a desktop/laptop.

For this reason, newer BIOSes will include an option to skip this error message when no keyboard is attached. Usually it is something like "Halt on All Errors except Keyboard". Additionally, the BIOSes on server-grade equipment or embedded systems are usually customized for headless operation, and will often have this error message bypassed by default.

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