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I am working on existing project. I have below user class's equals method. when I compare equality with equals I get false on

if (getClass() != other.getClass()) {
  return false;
}

The coomplete equals code:

@Override
public boolean equals(Object obj) {
  if (this == obj) {
    return true;
  }

  if (obj == null) {
    return false;
  }

  User other = (User) obj;
  if (getClass() != other.getClass()) {
    return false;
  }

  if (this.getUserId() == null) {
    if (other.getUserId() != null) {
      return false;
    }
  } else if (!this.getUserId().equals(other.getUserId())) {
    return false;
  }

  return true;
}

Do I require to check the class type here? If yes, why are my user classes are different? Why can not I put to check class type like below?

if (!(obj instanceof User)){
  return false;
}
share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

if (getClass() != other.getClass()) {
        return false;
    }

This check should be placed before the casting:

User other = (User) obj;

The difference between instanceof and getClass() is that the latter ensures that the type is not a sub-type. So:

User user = new SubUser();
boolean a = user instanceof User;
boolean b = user.getClass() == User.class;
System.out.println(a);
System.out.println(b);

would print:

true
false
share|improve this answer
    
agreed, but why my code returns false on getClass(), if i pass user object? here, currentUser.equals(query.getQueryLockBy()) –  CHowdappaM Oct 30 '13 at 9:09
    
@CHowdappaM It seems that the object type of currentUser is different from the object type of query.getQueryLockBy(). –  Eng.Fouad Oct 30 '13 at 9:11
    
Thanks. But i am 101% sure both are User. I have only one user class. Btw, currentUser taken from session. query's user is just detached object from hibernate session. Is this making difference? –  CHowdappaM Oct 30 '13 at 9:15
    
@CHowdappaM I am not experienced with Hibernate, but it could generate sub type of User by itself (You can test the class name by using, obj.getClass().getName()). If so, you could use instanceof instead. –  Eng.Fouad Oct 30 '13 at 9:17

You should use the instanceOf method to avoid a ClassCastException later. This Exception will be thrown if you use the equals method with the wrong object type.

share|improve this answer

First of all, I think you should inverse the lines

        User other = (User) obj;
        if (getClass() != other.getClass()) {
            return false;
        }

to become

    if (getClass() != other.getClass()) {
        return false;
    }
    User other = (User) obj;

Secondly, the equals method is an important one in the java collections library and in a lot of others as well so you should really think about any implementation details.

Suppose you have an Employee class (with an id) being subclassed into Manager, so you might consider writing an equals method on Employee just checking the id and you are fine. But, are you ? It depends.

So if you check in employee equals method it will return true if you pass a manager. But if you check on class equality by using getClass, it will return false when you pass a manager.

Suppose these 2 classes are stored in a database into an employee table and into a manager table respectively, the database has the id as a column which is defined as as an autoincrement column. Which means you can have an employee with id 100 who is a totally different person than a manager with id 100.

On the other hand you can have a single employee table storing all employees and managers. Hence here if you have an employee object with id 100 and a manager with id 100 then they must be the same person.

share|improve this answer
    
My original code as same as you mentioned. I was playing with instanceof and placed here and there. I don't have sub classes to User. –  CHowdappaM Oct 30 '13 at 9:20
    
While there are some cases where it may make sense to have objects of different types compare equal, I would not consider your example a particularly good one. The type of a thing which represents a person should not change when the person gets promoted. Instead, one should have encapsulate within an object which is of the same type for everyone one or more inheritable-class objects (perhaps derived from e.g. EmployeeDuties and/or EmployeeEarnings). That would allow the Employee object representing a line worker to continue to represent that person after his promotion. –  supercat Oct 30 '13 at 19:12

For your question, you should put

 getClass() != other.getClass()

before

 User other = (User) obj;

Equqality is an interesting question. And many people discussed about it. One detail dicussion on equality can be seen in Programming in Scala 2nd Chapter30.

share|improve this answer

The Effective Java book by Joshua Bloch provides very good suggestions to implement many, what one might consider, standard situations. It includes an approach to implementing the equals method.

Here is a modified implementation:

@Override
public boolean equals(Object obj) {
  if (this == obj) {
    return true;
  }

  if (!(obj instanceof User)) { // this covers the null check
    return false;
  }

  User other = (User) obj; // this is now safe

  if ((this.getUserId() == null) && other.getUserId() != null) {
      return false
  } else if ((this.getUserId() != null) && !this.getUserId().equals(other.getUserId())) {
    return false;
  }

  return true;
}

It is not so obvious, but the instanceof check returns false for null values simply because there is no way identify their type (i.e. nulls are untyped).

share|improve this answer

As I found, User class from hibernate layer/DAO is not a direct User class. It's sub class of User or a proxy. So, When I check with obj.getClass() it gives false.

In such cases, better not comparing with getClass().

I checked with instanceof.

share|improve this answer

here you stated that you don't have any subclasses of User so you can use instanceof check.

share|improve this answer
    
maybe you should, maybe not, it depends on what business wise your equals method should do ! –  GerritCap Oct 30 '13 at 9:14
    
@GerritCap I have updated answer, you happy now? –  Meet Oct 30 '13 at 13:34

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