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I wonder how it's possible to do a summation series in octave.

In matlab there is symsum function for it.

However I didn't found something similar for octave.

For example, I want to find the following sum

Sorry, I don't have enough reputation to post an image, therefore I will post a link.

sum

Addendum:

Whether it's possible to sum something like this

f = @(x) nchoosek(5,x)*0.1.^x*0.9.^(5-x)

sum(f([0:5]))

Failed with error

error: called from: error: /usr/share/octave/3.6.4/m/help/print_usage.m at line 87, column 5 error: /usr/share/octave/3.6.4/m/specfun/nchoosek.m at line 95, column 5 error: at line -1, column -1 error: evaluating argument list element number 1

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Do you want analytical solution for symbolic series summation or you just need a numerical one? symsum provides analytical solution and used for sumbolic series summation. –  Leonid Beschastny Oct 30 '13 at 10:45
    
@LeonidBeschastny, I need just the numeric one –  tam Oct 30 '13 at 11:55
1  
Then sum will probably do. Provide an example of your problem and I'll give you a solution. –  Leonid Beschastny Oct 30 '13 at 12:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

If you don't need an analitical solution, then you don't need symsum. For example if you want to calculate

\sum_{k=1}^{5} k

the you can simply use sum

sum([1:5])

Here is another example:

\sum_{k=1}^{5} \exp(-k)

f = @(x) exp(-x)
sum(f([1:5]))

And another one with factorial function:

\sum_{n=0}^{5} \frac{1}{n!} \approx e

g = @(n) 1 ./ factorial(n)
sum(g([0:5]))

the same, but without anonymous function:

sum(1 ./ factorial([0:5]))

Update

As for your last example, nchoosek allows only scalar arguments. So, you'll need additional arrayfun call:

f = @(x) nchoosek(5,x)*0.1.^x*0.9.^(5-x)
sum(arrayfun(f,[0:5]))
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much, for your answer. Could you please take a look at the addendum. I am trying to compute so far with no success. –  tam Nov 3 '13 at 12:04
    
@tam see my update. –  Leonid Beschastny Nov 3 '13 at 17:14

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