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I have a PHP script that receives variables via the query string.

In the beginning I use explode to put certain strings in an array as they contain several values I need to use. As an example:

index.php?a=2,2&b=foo&i=&s=bar

$d['i'] = explode(',',$_GET['i']); 
$d['s'] = $_GET['s'];       
$d['a'] = explode(',',$_GET['a']);
$d['b'] = explode(',',$_GET['b']);

I need to check if certain variables are set as they are mandatory, namely "i" and "s" must be set and contain some data.

When those are not set or empty, I want to redirect to an error page. However, it does not always work, and I can't figure out why. When I say "not always", that's what I mean. It seems to randomly accept and reject empty variables and I don't know why.

Here is my PHP code as I have it now:

    if(!$d['i'] || !$d['s']) {
        header('Location: error.php?e=2');
    }

First I only had the above, but then when the variables were set but empty, it still went through.

What I tried then is to use:

    if(strlen($d['i']) < 1 || strlen($d['s']) < 1) {
        header('Location: error.php?e=2');
    }

But for some weird reason it still accepts empty strings. I also tried this, without success:

    if(empty($d['i']) < 1 || empty($d['s']) < 1) {
        header('Location: error.php?e=2');
    }

Any clue on what I am doing wrong here?

share|improve this question
    
May be some unwnted space is comming so use trim() function.Also $d['i'] will be an array not a string –  웃웃웃웃웃 Oct 30 '13 at 11:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Direct answer:

Use trim and array_filter to make sure an array has values.

/* get the string value of i */
$i = $_GET['i'];

/* explode it into an array of values */
$i = explode(',', $i);

/* use array_map to apply trim to each value contained by i */
$i = array_map('trim', $i);

/* OR */

/* use array_map to apply intval / floatval to each value contained by i */
$i = array_map('intval', $i);

/* use array_filter to remove all empty entries */
/* this includes integer 0 (zero) values, empty strings, nulls etc. */
$i = array_filter($i);

/* OR */

/* use array_filter to remove all empty entries */
/* specify a function which validates if a value */
/* should be considered empty, perhaps you don't */
/* want integer 0 (zero) values to be filtered */
function my_filter($value) {
    return($value === '');
}

$i = array_filter($i, 'my_filter');

/* after trimming and filtering the array */
/* you can use PHP's `empty($i)` or `count($i) < 1` */
if(empty($i)) {
    /* do redirect */
}

Background info:

When you're trying to check if something is true or false, set or not set, empty or not empty there are a lot of implicit conversions and assumptions that are made.

In your particular case:

if($d['i'] || $d['s']) {}

Makes the following assumptions:

Since $d['i'] is an array, a true or false assessment is made based on weather !empty($d['i']) which means that it has to contain at least one value.

If for example the original string value from $_GET['i'] is ',' then the explode would generate an array containing two empty strings. Because $d['i'] contains the two empty strings it is considered not to be empty -- even if the values it contains are considered empty themselves.

If similarly the original string value from $_GET['i'] is '0' then the explode would generate an array containing one string. Because $d['i'] contains one string it is considered not to be empty -- even if the value it contains is considered empty itself.

If for example the original string value from $_GET['i'] is ' ' (notice the blank space) then the explode would generate an array containing a string containing one space. Because $d['i'] contains the string it is considered not to be empty.

share|improve this answer

After explode the variable will be an array not a string so you need to check by using the count.

if(!isset($d['i'][0]) || !isset($d['s'])) {
    header('Location: error.php?e=2');
}

OR

if(count($d['i']) < 1 || strlen($d['s']) < 1) {
    header('Location: error.php?e=2');
}
share|improve this answer

Thanks for the good hints and tips! Here is how I solved it now:

index.php?a=2,2&b=foo&i=&s=bar

if(empty(trim($_GET['i'])) || empty(trim($_GET['s'])) {
    header('Location: error.php?e=2');
}

$d['i'] = explode(',',trim($_GET['i'])); 
$d['s'] = trim($_GET['s']);       
$d['a'] = explode(',',trim($_GET['a']));
$d['b'] = explode(',',trim($_GET['b']));

Maybe not the best solution, but it works!

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