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I want to use class method pointer in wake_event as below, but compile error, I don't want use static member and method because there are maybe more than one instance of this class, is it possible? what can I modify my source?

class UncouplerController {
private:
    TouchSensor *touchSensor;
public:
    wakeup_t touched(wakeup_t data) {
        return UncouplerController::touchSensor->pressed();
    }

   const void uncoupling() {
       wait_event(&touched, 0);
   }
}

The compile error is as below

/usr/local/bin/h8300-hitachi-hms-g++ -DCXX -fno-rtti -fno-exceptions -O2 -fno-builtin -fomit-frame-pointer -Wall -I/brickos/include -I/brickos/include/lnp -I. -I/brickos/boot  -c rcx1.C -o rcx1.o
In file included from rcx1.H:27,
                 from rcx1.C:21:
UncouplerController.H: In function `static wakeup_t UncouplerController::untouched(long unsigned int)':
UncouplerController.H:38: member `UncouplerController::touchSensor' is non-static but referenced as a static member
UncouplerController.H:62: at this point in file
UncouplerController.H:63: warning: control reaches end of non-void function `UncouplerController::untouched(long unsigned int)'
UncouplerController.H: In method `const void UncouplerController::uncoupling()':
UncouplerController.H:74: converting from `wakeup_t (UncouplerController::*)(long unsigned int)' to `wakeup_t (*)(long unsigned int)'
UncouplerController.H: In method `const void UncouplerController::coupling()': 
UncouplerController.H:99: converting from `wakeup_t (UncouplerController::*)(long unsigned int)' to `wakeup_t (*)(long unsigned int)'
UncouplerController.H: At top level:
UncouplerController.H:112: `class TouchSensor * UncouplerController::touchSensor' is not a static member of `class UncouplerController'
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4  
What is wait_event? If it's something you made yourself you should read about std::function and std::bind. –  Joachim Pileborg Oct 30 '13 at 12:11
1  
The error says it is untouched, but you give us a definition for touched (which is not declared static!), you should make sure your example matches the error. –  crashmstr Oct 30 '13 at 12:13
    
    
If it's indeed the function pointed out by Lightness Races in Orbit, then you can't use member function pointers. –  Joachim Pileborg Oct 30 '13 at 12:30
    
You are right, it is wait_event in kernel! So I have no way to use member function... I used static member and function, then let wait_event as static, now I can use them do what I need! Then I think to move member out of class as global variable, and move touched out of class, now I can use them in regular, what do you think this ways? Which is better? –  mikezang Oct 30 '13 at 15:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The thing to know here is that a pointer to a member function is not the same as a pointer to a (standalone) function. The difference is that all member functions have a hidden first argument that is the this pointer in the function. Therefore you need to have an instance of an object to actually be able to call the member function pointer.

Only static member functions doesn't have this hidden first argument, as they don't have a this pointer (static member function are for the whole class, not for a specific instance) and so can be used as a normal function pointer.


There are three ways of using member function pointers.

  • The first is to use a static member function, and have an argument to it that will be a pointer to the instance. This will of course only work if the system allows you to pass extra arguments to the function pointer. If (and I'm only guessing here) the second argument to wait_event is such a "userdata" pointer, then this can be used for it:

    wait_event(&staticTouched, this);
    

    Then you make a static member function that calls the real function:

    static void staticTouched(void* instance)
    {
        static_cast<UncouplerController*>(instance)->touched();
    }
    
  • The second method is if the wait_event is a member of your class, in which case it can actually use its own this pointer when calling the member function:

    void wait_event(void (UncouplerController::*func)(), ...)
    {
        // Do stuff...
    
        (this->func)();  // Call the member function pointer
    }
    
  • The third way is to use the new C++11 std::function class, instead of member function pointers. This will make the event-handling system more generic, as std::function can be used to store normal functions, static member functions, non-static member functions and lambda expressions. Other than this, it's very similar to the second case:

    void wait_event(std::function<void()> func, ...)
    {
        // Do stuff...
    
        func();  // Call the function object
    }
    

    Then to call the wait_event with the member function pointer, you use std::bind:

    wait_event(std::bind(&UncouplerController::touched, this), 0);
    

If the wait_event function is the one pointed out by Lightness Races in Orbit, then you can't use member function pointers. And the first case in my list above is then wrong as the second argument is something completely different.

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2  
While correct, doesn't it depend on what wait_event expects as an argument if this even matters? –  pmr Oct 30 '13 at 12:14
    
wakeup_t as int –  mikezang Oct 30 '13 at 15:27

Here is my code, it works.

class UncouplerController {
private:
    static TouchSensor *touchSensor;

public:
    UncouplerController(Sensor::Port sensorPort) {
        touchSensor = new TouchSensor(sensorPort);
    }
    ~UncouplerController() {
        delete touchSensor;
    }
    static wakeup_t touched(wakeup_t data) {
        return UncouplerController::touchSensor->pressed();
    }
    static wakeup_t untouched(wakeup_t data) {
        return !UncouplerController::touchSensor->pressed();
    }
    const void uncoupling() {
        wait_event(&UncouplerController::touched, 0);
        delay(UNCOUPLING_TIME1);
    }
    const void coupling() {
        wait_event(&UncouplerController::touched, 0);
        wait_event(&UncouplerController::untouched, 0);  
        delay(COUPLING_TIME);
    }
};

TouchSensor *UncouplerController::touchSensor;

I want to know if no static member or function used, and move all of them out of class, I can get the same result!! does anyone tell me which way is better? thanks for your help.

share|improve this answer

I'm agreed with Joachim. On the other hand, I'll give you some tips to your code, let me know if works for you.

Change the line:

return UncouplerController::touchSensor->pressed();

by:

return this->touchSensor->pressed();

wait_event is especting a standalone function, you are passing a function that is a class member, that's why the following line in the output error:

UncouplerController.H:74: converting from `wakeup_t (UncouplerController::*)(long unsigned int)' to `wakeup_t (*)(long unsigned int)'

So, you can redefine touched in order to return some pointer to the standalone function, and change it's behavior using params. Or, declare wakeup_t as standalone function and make it friend of the class. The second one looks like quite much easier.

Let me know if worked. If you post some more code perhaps could help you more.

Another way is using keyword "reinterpret_cast" but I don't recommend it.

Well you can try something like:

// Define the type expected by  "wait_event"
typedef wakeup_t (*wake_func_ptr) (wakeup_t data);


class UncouplerController {

private:
    TouchSensor *touchSensor;

public:
    // Member for pointing the target functions.
    wake_func_ptr touched;
    wake_func_ptr untouched;

    UncouplerController(Sensor::Port sensorPort)
    {
        // This will rise a lot of warnings.
        // I strongly not recomend to do this.
        // But it seems to be a solution.
        touched = reinterpret_cast<wake_func_ptr>(&UncouplerController::touched_func);
        untouched = reinterpret_cast<wake_func_ptr>(&UncouplerController::untouched_func);

        touchSensor = new TouchSensor(sensorPort);
    }


    ~UncouplerController() {
        delete touchSensor;
    }

    wakeup_t touched_func(wakeup_t data) {
        return touchSensor->pressed();
    }

    wakeup_t untouched_func(wakeup_t data) {
        return touchSensor->pressed();
    }


    const void uncoupling() {
        wait_event(touched, 0);
        delay(UNCOUPLING_TIME1);
    }

    const void coupling() {
        wait_event(touched, 0);
        wait_event(untouched, 0);
        delay(COUPLING_TIME);
    }
};

// The purpose of this line isn't clear for me.
TouchSensor *UncouplerController::touchSensor;
share|improve this answer
    
return this->touchSensor->pressed(); doesn't work! –  mikezang Oct 30 '13 at 15:49

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