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We're building a potentially large array of objects programmatically.

var subjects = {
[
    row: {subjectName: "a name", index: 1, ref: "er4", qty: 4},
    row: {subjectName: "a name", index: 1, ref: "er4", qty: 4},
    row: {subjectName: "a name", index: 1, ref: "er4", qty: 4},
    row: {subjectName: "a name", index: 1, ref: "er4", qty: 4},
    row: {subjectName: "a name", index: 1, ref: "er4", qty: 4},
]
}

This array could grow to potentially 500 or so rows and will be used at runtime as a lookup (no looping, just going to the object directly using an id). It will also accasioanally get updated. I'm just wondering if there are any performance issues related to having a largeish object in memory like this?

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2  
500 ? Thats childs play dude.. – jAndy Oct 30 '13 at 13:17
    
I realize 500 is not exactly a huge amount. Just needed to know if there are any potential performance pitfalls with working with an object in memory. – Mike Rifgin Oct 30 '13 at 13:31
up vote 2 down vote accepted

One Large Object vs Many Small Objects

Google V8 Design - Fast Property Access

Hopefully these are helpful

Ideally you shouldn't worry too much about performance (to an extent) and just design something that makes sense and is natural.

If smaller objects are an option, they tend to perform better; but if the large object makes sense or is the only option, I wouldn't worry about it.

share|improve this answer
    
Added some info – lrich Oct 30 '13 at 13:57

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