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I need to change color of TextBox whenever its required field validator is fired on Clicking the Submit button

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14 Answers

What you can do is register a Javascript function that will iterate through the global Page_Validators array after submission and you can set the background appropriately. The nice thing about this is that you can use it on all of your controls on the page. The function looks like this:

function fnOnUpdateValidators()
{
   for (var i = 0; i < Page_Validators.length; i++)
   {
      var val = Page_Validators[i];
      var ctrl = document.getElementById(val.controltovalidate);
      if (ctrl != null && ctrl.style != null)
      {
         if (!val.isvalid)
            ctrl.style.background = '#FFAAAA';
         else
            ctrl.style.backgroundColor = '';
      }
   }
}

The final step is to register the script with the OnSubmit event:

VB.NET:

Page.ClientScript.RegisterOnSubmitStatement(Me.GetType, "val", "fnOnUpdateValidators();")

C#:

Page.ClientScript.RegisterOnSubmitStatement(this.GetType(), "val", "fnOnUpdateValidators();");

You'll maintain the proper IsValid status in all of your code behind and it can work with all of your controls.

Note: I found this solution from the following blog. I just wanted to document it here in the event the source blog goes down.

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1  
I like this solution - one change I made myself is to allow for a control to have multiple validators. Cant edit posts yet so not sure how to go about sharing it. –  Dieter G Apr 15 '10 at 2:26
1  
Dieter G - just add another answer with the update –  Rory Aug 14 '12 at 12:42
    
where is the WebForm_OnSubmit? i have searched my whole project but cannot find a reference to it –  sQuijeW Oct 25 '13 at 23:26
    
@sQuijeW Did you use the "final step" code above? That will register the action to the appropriate event. –  Dillie-O Oct 28 '13 at 15:36
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You could use CustomValidator instead of RequiredFieldValidator:

.ASPX

<asp:CustomValidator ID="CustomValidator1" runat="server" ErrorMessage=""
    ControlToValidate="TextBox1" ClientValidationFunction="ValidateTextBox"
    OnServerValidate="CustomValidator1_ServerValidate"
    ValidateEmptyText="True"></asp:CustomValidator>

<asp:TextBox ID="TextBox1" runat="server"></asp:TextBox>

<script src="jquery-1.2.6.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
    function ValidateTextBox(source, args)
    {
        var is_valid = $("#TextBox1").val() != "";
        $("#TextBox1").css("background-color", is_valid ? "white" : "red");
        args.IsValid = is_valid;
    }
</script>

.CS

protected void CustomValidator1_ServerValidate(object source, ServerValidateEventArgs args)
{
    bool is_valid = TextBox1.Text != "";
    TextBox1.BackColor = is_valid ? Color.White : Color.Red;
    args.IsValid = is_valid;
}

Logic in client and server validation functions is the same, but the client function uses jQuery to access textbox value and modify its background color.

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thank you ..... –  Mostafa Aug 11 '10 at 20:49
    
Thank you very much –  Jonathan O Sep 9 '11 at 14:38
2  
If jquery is not present, you can use function ValidateTextBox(source, args) { var target = document.getElementById("TextBox1"); var is_valid = target.value != ""; if( is_valid ){ target.style.backgroundColor = "White"; }else{ target.style.backgroundColor = "Red"; } args.IsValid = is_valid; } –  Travis J Dec 18 '12 at 20:51
    
does this prevent postback if not valid? –  DevDave Mar 1 '13 at 18:17
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You can very easily override ASP.NET's javascript function that updates the display of validated fields. This is a nice option as you can keep your existing Field Validators, and don't have to write any custom validation logic or go looking for the fields to validate. In the example below I'm adding/removing an 'error' class from the parent element that has class 'control-group' (because I'm using twitter bootstrap css):

    /**
    * Re-assigns the ASP.NET validation JS function to
    * provide a more flexible approach
    */
    function UpgradeASPNETValidation() {
        if (typeof (Page_ClientValidate) != "undefined") {
            AspValidatorUpdateDisplay = ValidatorUpdateDisplay;
            ValidatorUpdateDisplay = NicerValidatorUpdateDisplay;
        }
    }

    /**
    * This function is called once for each Field Validator, passing in the 
    * Field Validator span, which has helpful properties 'isvalid' (bool) and
    * 'controltovalidate' (string = id of the input field to validate).
    */
    function NicerValidatorUpdateDisplay(val) {
        // Do the default asp.net display of validation errors (remove if you want)
        AspValidatorUpdateDisplay(val);

        // Add our custom display of validation errors
        if (val.isvalid) {
            // do whatever you want for invalid controls
            $('#' + val.controltovalidate).closest('.control-group').removeClass('error');
        } else {
            // reset invalid controls so they display as valid
            $('#' + val.controltovalidate).closest('.control-group').addClass('error');
        }
    }

    // Call UpgradeASPNETValidation after the page has loaded so that it 
    // runs after the standard ASP.NET scripts.
    $(document).ready(UpgradeASPNETValidation);

This is adapted ever-so-slightly from here and with helpful info from these articles.

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This worked great for what I needed. Thank you. –  Brad M Dec 5 '13 at 19:06
    
Works wrong way when control has several validators. –  Der_Meister Feb 8 at 8:01
    
This is a great idea. I was trying to find a way to hijack the existing validation stuff and this is perfect. As long those function names aren't subject to change. Thanks! I think you got your comments around valid/invalid backwards, though. –  xr280xr May 22 at 17:39
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I liked Rory's answer, but it doesn't work well with ValidationGroups, certainly in my instance where I have two validators on one field triggered by two different buttons.

The problem is that ValidatorValidate will mark the validator as 'isValid' if it is not in the current ValidationGroup, but our class-changing code does not pay any attention. This meant the the display was not correct (certainly IE9 seems to not like to play).

so to get around it I made the following changes:

    /**
    * Re-assigns the ASP.NET validation JS function to
    * provide a more flexible approach
    */
    function UpgradeASPNETValidation() {
        if (typeof (Page_ClientValidate) != "undefined") {
            AspValidatorUpdateDisplay = ValidatorUpdateDisplay;
            ValidatorUpdateDisplay = NicerValidatorUpdateDisplay;
            AspValidatorValidate = ValidatorValidate;
            ValidatorValidate = NicerValidatorValidate;
        }
    }

    /**
    * This function is called once for each Field Validator, passing in the 
    * Field Validator span, which has helpful properties 'isvalid' (bool) and
    * 'controltovalidate' (string = id of the input field to validate).
    */
    function NicerValidatorUpdateDisplay(val) {
        // Do the default asp.net display of validation errors (remove if you want)
        AspValidatorUpdateDisplay(val);

        // Add our custom display of validation errors
        // IF we should be paying any attention to this validator at all
        if ((typeof (val.enabled) == "undefined" || val.enabled != false) && IsValidationGroupMatch(val, AspValidatorValidating)) {
            if (val.isvalid) {
                // do whatever you want for invalid controls
                $('#' + val.controltovalidate).parents('.control-group:first').removeClass('error');
            } else {
                // reset invalid controls so they display as valid
                //$('#' + val.controltovalidate).parents('.control-group:first').addClass('error');
                var t = $('#' + val.controltovalidate).parents('.control-group:first');
                t.addClass('error');
            }
        }
    }

    function NicerValidatorValidate(val, validationGroup, event) {
        AspValidatorValidating = validationGroup;
        AspValidatorValidate(val, validationGroup, event);
    }

    // Call UpgradeASPNETValidation after the page has loaded so that it 
    // runs after the standard ASP.NET scripts.
    $(document).ready(UpgradeASPNETValidation);
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Very nice! This does, however, break for me if I have more than one validator associated with a control. Only the last validator has any effect, as it overrides any that went before it (i.e. it will remove the css class if it's valid, even if one of the preceding validators failed). –  Leigh Bowers Sep 26 '13 at 14:50
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I liked Alexander's answer, but wanted the javascript to be more generic. So, here is a generic way of consuming the errors from a custom validator.

    function ValidateTextBox(source, args) {
        var cntrl_id = $(source).attr("controltovalidate");
        var cntrl = $("#" + cntrl_id);
        var is_valid = $(cntrl).val() != "";
        is_valid ? $(cntrl).removeClass("error") : $(cntrl).addClass("error");

        args.IsValid = is_valid;
    }
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Another possibility... this code gives a red border (or whatever you put inside the CSS class) to the control to validate (works for dropdownlists and textbox, but can be extended for buttons etc...)

First of, I make use of a CustomValidator instead of a RequiredFieldValidator, because then you can use the ClientValidationFunction of the CustomValidator to change the CSS of the control to validate.

For example: change the border of a textbox MyTextBox when a user forgot to fill it in. The CustomValidator for the MyTextBox control would look like this:

<asp:CustomValidator ID="CustomValidatorMyTextBox" runat="server" ErrorMessage=""
     Display="None" ClientValidationFunction="ValidateInput" 
     ControlToValidate="MyTextBox" ValidateEmptyText="true" 
     ValidationGroup="MyValidationGroup">
     </asp:CustomValidator>

Or it could also work for a dropdownlist in which a selection is required. The CustomValidator would look the same as above, but with the ControlToValidate pointing to the dropdownlist.

For the client-side script, make use of JQuery. The ValidateInput method would look like this:

    <script type="text/javascript">
    function ValidateInput(source, args)
    {
        var controlName = source.controltovalidate;
        var control = $('#' + controlName);
        if (control.is('input:text')) {
            if (control.val() == "") {
                control.addClass("validation");
                args.IsValid = false;
            }
            else {
                control.removeClass("validation");
                args.IsValid = true;
            }
        }
        else if (control.is('select')) {
            if (control.val() == "-1"[*] ) {
                control.addClass("validation");
                args.IsValid = false;
            }
            else {
                control.removeClass("validation");
                args.IsValid = true;
            }
        }
    }
    </script>

The “validation” class is a CSS class that contains the markup when the validator is fired. It could look like this:

.validation { border: solid 2px red; }

PS: to make the border color work for the dropdown list in IE, add the following meta tag to the page's heading: <meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=edge" />.

[*]This is the same as the “InitialValue” of a RequiredFieldValidator. This is the item that is selected as default when the user hasn’t selected anything yet.​

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I know this is old, but I have another modified combination from Dillie-O and Alexander. This uses jQuery with the blur event to remove the style when validation succeeds.

function validateFields() {
    try {
        var count = 0;
        var hasFocus = false;

        for (var i = 0; i < Page_Validators.length; i++) {
            var val = Page_Validators[i];
            var ctrl = document.getElementById(val.controltovalidate);

            validateField(ctrl, val);

            if (!val.isvalid) { count++; }
            if (!val.isvalid && hasFocus === false) {
                ctrl.focus(); hasFocus = true;
            }
        }

        if (count == 0) {
            hasFocus = false;
        }
    }
    catch (err) { }
}

function validateField(ctrl, val)
{
    $(ctrl).blur(function () { validateField(ctrl, val); });

    if (ctrl != null && $(ctrl).is(':disabled') == false) { // && ctrl.style != null
        val.isvalid ? $(ctrl).removeClass("error") : $(ctrl).addClass("error");
    }            

    if ($(ctrl).hasClass('rdfd_') == true) { //This is a RadNumericTextBox
        var rtxt = document.getElementById(val.controltovalidate + '_text');
        val.isvalid ? $(rtxt).removeClass("error") : $(rtxt).addClass("error");
    }
}
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Another way,

$(document).ready(function() {
    HighlightControlToValidate();
    $('#<%=btnSave.ClientID %>').click(function() {
        if (typeof (Page_Validators) != "undefined") {
            for (var i = 0; i < Page_Validators.length; i++) {
                if (!Page_Validators[i].isvalid) {
                    $('#' + Page_Validators[i].controltovalidate).css("background", "#f3d74f");
                }
                else {
                    $('#' + Page_Validators[i].controltovalidate).css("background", "white");
                }
            }
        }
    });
});

Reference: http://www.codedigest.com/Articles/ASPNET/414_Highlight_Input_Controls_when_Validation_fails_in_AspNet_Validator_controls.aspx

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Welcome to Stack Overflow! Whilst this may theoretically answer the question, we would like you to include the essential parts of the linked article in your answer, and provide the link for reference. Failing to do that leaves the answer at risk from link rot. –  Kev Nov 26 '11 at 14:57
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I made a working one pager example of this for regular asp.net, no .control-group

<%@ Page Language="C#" AutoEventWireup="true" CodeFile="Default.aspx.cs" Inherits="_Default" %>

<!DOCTYPE html>
<!-- http://stackoverflow.com/questions/196859/change-text-box-color-using-required-field-validator-no-extender-controls-pleas -->
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head runat="server">
    <title></title>
    <script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-1.11.0.min.js"></script>
<script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-migrate-1.2.1.min.js"></script>
    <script>
        /**
  * Re-assigns the ASP.NET validation JS function to
  * provide a more flexible approach
  */
        function UpgradeASPNETValidation() {
            if (typeof (Page_ClientValidate) != "undefined") {
                AspValidatorUpdateDisplay = ValidatorUpdateDisplay;
                ValidatorUpdateDisplay = NicerValidatorUpdateDisplay;
                AspValidatorValidate = ValidatorValidate;
                ValidatorValidate = NicerValidatorValidate;
            }
        }

        /**
        * This function is called once for each Field Validator, passing in the 
        * Field Validator span, which has helpful properties 'isvalid' (bool) and
        * 'controltovalidate' (string = id of the input field to validate).
        */
        function NicerValidatorUpdateDisplay(val) {
            // Do the default asp.net display of validation errors (remove if you want)
            AspValidatorUpdateDisplay(val);

            // Add our custom display of validation errors
            // IF we should be paying any attention to this validator at all
            if ((typeof (val.enabled) == "undefined" || val.enabled != false) && IsValidationGroupMatch(val, AspValidatorValidating)) {
                if (val.isvalid) {
                    // do whatever you want for invalid controls
                    $('#' + val.controltovalidate).removeClass('error');
                } else {
                    // reset invalid controls so they display as valid
                    //$('#' + val.controltovalidate).parents('.control-group:first').addClass('error');
                    var t = $('#' + val.controltovalidate);
                    t.addClass('error');
                }
            }
        }

        function NicerValidatorValidate(val, validationGroup, event) {
            AspValidatorValidating = validationGroup;
            AspValidatorValidate(val, validationGroup, event);
        }

        // Call UpgradeASPNETValidation after the page has loaded so that it 
        // runs after the standard ASP.NET scripts.
        $(document).ready(UpgradeASPNETValidation);
    </script>
    <style>
        .error {
            border: 1px solid red;
        }
    </style>
</head>
<body>
    <form id="form1" runat="server">
    <div>

        <asp:TextBox ID="TextBox1" runat="server" ></asp:TextBox>
        <asp:RequiredFieldValidator ID="RequiredFieldValidator1" runat="server" ControlToValidate="TextBox1" ErrorMessage="RequiredFieldValidator"></asp:RequiredFieldValidator>
        <asp:Button ID="Button1" runat="server" Text="Button" />

        <br />
        <asp:TextBox ID="TextBox2" runat="server"></asp:TextBox>
        <asp:RegularExpressionValidator ID="RegularExpressionValidator1" runat="server" ControlToValidate="TextBox2" ErrorMessage="RegularExpressionValidator" ValidationExpression="\w+([-+.']\w+)*@\w+([-.]\w+)*\.\w+([-.]\w+)*"></asp:RegularExpressionValidator>
        <br />
        <asp:TextBox ID="TextBox3" runat="server"></asp:TextBox>
        <asp:RangeValidator ID="RangeValidator1" runat="server" ControlToValidate="TextBox3" ErrorMessage="RangeValidator" MaximumValue="100" MinimumValue="0"></asp:RangeValidator>

    </div>
    </form>
</body>
</html>
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Here's some self-contained HTML/JS that does the trick:

<html>
  <head>
    <script type="text/javascript">
      function mkclr(cntl,clr) {
        document.getElementById(cntl).style.backgroundColor = clr;
      };
    </script>
  </head>
  <body>
    <form>
      <input type="textbox" id="tb1"></input>
      <input type="submit" value="Go"
        onClick="javascript:mkclr('tb1','red');">
      </input>
    </form>
  </body>
</html>
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I too liked Alexanders and Steves answer but I wanted the same as in codebehind. I think this code might do it but it differes depending on your setup. My controls are inside a contentplaceholder.

protected void cvPhone_ServerValidate(object source, ServerValidateEventArgs args)
{
    bool is_valid = !string.IsNullOrEmpty(args.Value);
    string control = ((CustomValidator)source).ControlToValidate;
    ((TextBox)this.Master.FindControl("ContentBody").FindControl(control)).CssClass = is_valid ? string.Empty : "inputError";
    args.IsValid = is_valid;
}
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I had to make a few changes to Steve's suggestion to get mine working,

 function ValidateTextBox(source, args) {
    var controlId = document.getElementById(source.controltovalidate).id;
    var control = $("#" + controlId);
    var value = control.val();
    var is_valid = value != "";
    is_valid ? control.removeClass("error") : control.addClass("error");
    args.IsValid = is_valid;
  }

great example though, exactly what I needed.

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<%@ Page Language="C#" AutoEventWireup="true" CodeBehind="Custemvalidatin.aspx.cs" Inherits="AspDotNetPractice.Custemvalidatin" %>

<!DOCTYPE html>

<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head runat="server">
    <title></title>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        function vali(source, args) {
            if (document.getElementById(source.controltovalidate).value.length > 0) {
                args.IsValid = true;
                document.getElementById(source.controltovalidate).style.borderColor = 'green';
            }
            else {
                args.IsValid = false;
                document.getElementById(source.controltovalidate).style.borderColor = 'red';
            }

        }
    </script>
</head>
<body>
    <form id="form1" runat="server">
        <div>
            <asp:TextBox ID="TextBox1" Style="border:1px solid gray; width:270px; height:24px ; border-radius:6px;"   runat="server"></asp:TextBox>

            <asp:CustomValidator ID="CustomValidator1" runat="server" ControlToValidate="TextBox1"
                ErrorMessage="Enter First Name" SetFocusOnError="True" Display="Dynamic" ClientValidationFunction="vali" 
                ValidateEmptyText="True" Font-Size="Small" ForeColor="Red">Enter First Name</asp:CustomValidator><br /><br /><br />

            <asp:TextBox ID="TextBox2" Style="border:1px solid gray; width:270px; height:24px ; border-radius:6px;"  runat="server"></asp:TextBox>

            <asp:CustomValidator ID="CustomValidator2" runat="server" ClientValidationFunction="vali"
                ControlToValidate="TextBox2" Display="Dynamic" ErrorMessage="Enter Second Name"
                SetFocusOnError="True" ValidateEmptyText="True" Font-Size="Small" ForeColor="Red">Enter Second Name</asp:CustomValidator><br />
            <br />
            <br />

            <asp:Button ID="Button1" runat="server" Text="Button" />
        </div>
    </form>
</body>
</html>
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It is not exactly without changing controls user used to, but I think this way is easier (not writing the full example, I think it is not necessary):

ASP.NET:

    <asp:TextBox ID="TextBox1" runat="server" ></asp:TextBox>
    <asp:CustomValidator runat="server" ControlToValidate="TextBox1" Display="Dynamic" Text="TextBox1 Not Set" ValidateEmptyText="true" OnServerValidate="ServerValidate" />
    <asp:Button ID="Button1" runat="server" Text="Button" OnClick="Execute" />

Code:

protected void Execute(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
   Page.Validate();
   if (Page.IsValid)
   {
       *some code*
   }
}

protected void ServerValidate(object source, ServerValidateEventArgs args)
{
    CustomValidator cval = source as CustomValidator;
    if (cval == null)
    {
        args.IsValid = false;
        return;
    }

    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(args.Value))
    {
        args.IsValid = false;
        string _target = cval.ControlToValidate;
        TextBox tb = cval.Parent.FindControl(_target) as TextBox;
        tb.BorderColor = System.Drawing.Color.Red;
    }
    else
    {
        args.IsValid = true;
    }
}
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