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I know that it isn't possible to extend enum in Java, but I am trying to find an elegant solution for the below

I am trying to model enums (or classes) which will contain http end points of various web services across regions, say I have service A and B, each will have 4 region specific end points in US, EU, JP or CN. (This is basically for some seperate debug code that I am writing, in production the end points will be picked from configuration)

I was hoping to do something like this (not compliant java code).

public enum IEndPoint {
    NA_END_POINT,
    EU_END_POINT,
    JP_END_POINT,
    CN_END_POINT,
}

public enum ServiceAEndPoint extends IEndPoint {
   NA_END_POINT("http://A.com/");
   EU_END_POINT("http://A-eu.com/");
   JP_END_POINT("http://A-jp.com/");
   CN_END_POINT("http://A-cn.com/");
}

I could do this using interfaces where I have a method for each region, but in my opinion the enum way is more expressive, is there any better way I could model this ? What I am looking for is if there is any better way to model the inheritence relation and also having the expressive power of enumerations.

ServiceAEndPoint.NA_END_POINT

vs

serviceAEndPoint.getNAEndPoint()
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Can't you put a constructor and a getter in your IEndPoint enum ? –  Julien Oct 30 '13 at 14:58

6 Answers 6

I'm assuming that you will also want a ServiceBEndPoint enum (and similar). In which case I don't think your model really makes that much sense.

IEndPoint is really an enumeration of the kind of environments/regions where a service might be running. It is not an enumeration of the services themselves. Each individual service (A, B or whatever) will have different addresses for each of the regions.

Therefore I would stick with just the IEndPoint enum, and then in some service-specific code have a lookup map that will give you the address for a given end-point. Something like this:

public enum IEndPoint {
    NA_END_POINT,
    EU_END_POINT,
    JP_END_POINT,
    CN_END_POINT,
}

public class ServiceABroker {
   private static final Map<IEndPoint, String> addressesByEndPoint;
   static {
      addressesByEndPoint = new EnumMap<>();
      addressesByEndPoint.put(NA_END_POINT, "http://A.com/");
      addressesByEndPoint.put(EU_END_POINT, "http://A-eu.com/");
      addressesByEndPoint.put(JP_END_POINT, "http://A-jp.com/");
      addressesByEndPoint.put(CN_END_POINT, "http://A-cn.com/");
   }

   public String getAddressForEndPoint(IEndPoint ep) {
       return addressesByEndPoint.get(ep);
   }
}
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I like this service layer approach better than the solution I proposed. –  David Fleeman Oct 30 '13 at 15:12
    
Thanks for the reply, but this still doesn't solve the original problem of not having to represent an end point as a String which I why I thought having a class or an enum around it would make it more expressive. –  jack_carver Oct 30 '13 at 15:12
    
@jack_carver - by all means, you can represent it as an object, with a url property (amongst other things). But the object itself (the region-specific service instance) is distinct from the end point, which is just one of four values. They're not the same thing, it's just that there is a relationship between them. It makes most sense to me then to have this map between the end point and the serviceA-that-is-running-there. –  Andrzej Doyle Oct 30 '13 at 15:29

If these are static final constants, then just put them in an interface. Name the interface something like IServiceAEndPointKeys, where the keys part is a convention.

Here's where I consider enums to be more appropriate and useful:

  • Example 1: File type. An enum containing jpg, pdf etc.
  • Example 2: Column definitions. If I have a table with 3 columns, I would write an enum declaring ID, Name, Description (for example), each one having parameters like column header name, column width and column ID.
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Im not sure I understand you question, but you can add methods to an enum for example you could do something like the following:

public enum ServiceAEndPoint{
    NA_END_POINT("http://A.com/");
    EU_END_POINT("http://A-eu.com/");
    JP_END_POINT("http://A-jp.com/");
    CN_END_POINT("http://A-cn.com/");

    private final String url;

    private EndPoint(String url){
        this.url=url;
    }

    public String getURL(){
        return url;
    }
}
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Enums cannot be extended in such a manner, mostly because enums cannot be sub-classed or the constraints they must adhere to will not be possible to impose.

Instead leverage interfaces, like so

public interface IEndPoint;

public enum DefaultEndPoints implements IEndPoint {
    NA_END_POINT,
    EU_END_POINT,
    JP_END_POINT,
    CN_END_POINT,
}

public enum DefaultServiceEndPoints implements IEndPoint {
   NA_END_POINT("http://A.com/");
   EU_END_POINT("http://A-eu.com/");
   JP_END_POINT("http://A-jp.com/");
   CN_END_POINT("http://A-cn.com/");
}

public void doSomething(IEndPoint endpoint) {
  ...
}

The reason why one can't subclass in the manner you wish is related to the contract that enums will be both equal via .equals(object) and via ==. If you could subclass, would this make sense?

if ( (DefaultEndPoints)JP_END_POINT == (DefaultServiceEndPoints)JP_END_POINT) {

}

if you say "yes" then I would expect to be able to do this

DefaultEndPoint someEndpoint = DefaultServiceEndPoints.JP_END_POINT;

which would leave a door open for error, as there is no guarantee that a enum entry in one enum declaration is in the other enum declaration.

Could it be different? Perhaps, but it isn't, and changing it would definately introduce a lot of complications that would have to be thoroughly thought out (or it would open avenues to work around Java's strong static-type checking).

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You may want to consider something like this:

public abstract class EndpointFactory {
    public abstract String getNAEndPoint();
    public abstract String getEUEndPoint();
}

public class ServiceAEndpointFactory extends EndpointFactory {
    public static final String NA_END_POINT = "http://A.com/";
    public static final String EU_END_POINT = "http://A-eu.com/";

    public String getNAEndPoint() {
       return ServiceAEndpointFactory.NA_END_POINT;
    }

    public String getEUEndPoint() {
       return ServiceAEndpointFactory.EU_END_POINT;
    }
}

public class ServiceBEndpointFactory extends EndpointFactory {
    public static final String NA_END_POINT = "http://B.com/";
    public static final String EU_END_POINT = "http://B-eu.com/";

    public String getNAEndPoint() {
       return ServiceAEndpointFactory.NA_END_POINT;
    }

    public String getEUEndPoint() {
       return ServiceAEndpointFactory.EU_END_POINT;
    }
}

Then you can refer to your strings directly like this:

ServiceAEndpointFactory.NA_END_POINT;

Or, you can use the base object if the type of service is not known until execution:

EndpointFactory ef1 = new ServiceAEndpointFactory();
String ep = ef1.getNAEndPoint();

The drawback of this is the redefinition of the get*Endpoint() functions in each sub-class. You could eliminate that by moving the static final variables to be not static in the base class and putting the getter/setter in the base class only one time. However, the drawback of that is you are not able to reference the values without instantiating an object (which essentially emulates what I find valuable with ENUMs).

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How does a pattern like this appeal to you? I let the enum implement an interface and implement the interface in a Debug set and a Release set. The release set can then derive the property name from the enum name - which is neat.

public interface HasURL {
  public String getURL();
}

public enum DebugEndPoints implements HasURL {
  NA,
  EU,
  JP,
  CN;

  @Override
  public String getURL() {
    // Force debug to go to the same one always.
    return "http://Debug.com/";
  }
}

public enum NormalEndPoints implements HasURL {
  NA,
  EU,
  JP,
  CN;
  final String url;

  NormalEndPoints () {
    // Grab the configured property connected to my name.
    this.url = getProperty(this.name());
  }
  @Override
  public String getURL() {
    return url;
  }
}
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