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If I want to save any changes in a table, previously saved in SQL Server Management Studio (no data in table present) I get an error message:

"Saving changes is not permitted. The changes you have made require the following tables to be dropped and re-created. You have either made changes to a table that can't be re-created or enabled the option Prevent saving changes that require the table to be re-created."

What can prevent the table to be easily edited? Or, is it the usual way for SQL Server Management Studio to require re-creating table for editing? What is it - this "option Prevent saving changes"?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 51 down vote accepted

To work around this problem, use SQL statements to make the changes to the metadata structure of a table.

This problem occurs when "Prevent saving changes that require table re-creation" option is enabled.

Source: Error message when you try to save a table in SQL Server 2008: "Saving changes is not permitted"

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1  
My question here is: why does not SQL Server use the required T-SQL statements instead of dropping and recreating the table for every single change? I cannot understand this behavior. –  Jaime Oct 30 '13 at 15:13

Go into Tools -> Options -> Designers-> Uncheck "Prevent saving changes that require table re-creation". Voila.

That happens because sometimes it is necessary to drop and recreate a table in order to change something. This can take a while, since all data must be copied to a temp table and then re-inserted in the new table. Since SQL Server by default doesn't trust you, you need to say "OK, I know what I'm doing, now let me do my work."

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Thanks, Pedro. It seems Daniel was the first to answer, but +1 for clear and brief answer. –  rem Dec 28 '09 at 13:44
5  
Microsoft Support site discourages this, but if you don't have any data in the table, I don't see the harm. Probably best to use TSQL to make the changes. –  Jon Smock Feb 17 '10 at 16:38
    
+1 - Thanks for the concise, easy answer! –  Shaul Jun 8 '10 at 14:20
3  
+1 for pointing out exactly where that "Prevent saving changes that require table re-creation" is (Tools -> Options -> Designers) –  Eternal Learner Oct 12 '12 at 19:18
    
I would personally discourage using the designer for important databases. I have seen it make costly mistakes on many occasions. Besides, it promotes lazy development habits and allows people to modify database structure who may not be proficient enough to do so if they can't manage the SQL code route. –  Mark W Dickson Jan 23 at 17:40

Tools>Options

enter image description here

Uncheck above option

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3  
Thanks for the screenshot. I was looking for something like this to help me find that stupid option. The dialog should have a checkbox for "do it anyway" when it says you cannot. –  Chris Benard Jun 21 '13 at 17:15
    
The Best Practice After you change this option is to check the upper option 'Auto generate change scripts' in order to prevent data lose –  dubi Jan 27 at 9:49
    
Thanks for the Image. It's very useful :) –  Muneeb Amjad Feb 5 at 7:48

Many changes you can make very easily and visually in the table editor in SQL Server Management Studio actually require SSMS to drop the table in the background and re-create it from scratch. Even simple things like reordering the columns cannot be expressed in standard SQL DDL statement - all SSMS can do is drop and recreate the table.

This operation can be a) very time consuming on a large table, or b) might even fail for various reasons (like FK constraints and stuff). Therefore, SSMS in SQL Server 2008 introduced that new option the other answers have already identified.

It might seem counter-intuitive at first to prevent such changes - and it's certainly a nuisance on a dev server. But on a production server, this option and its default value of preventing such changes becomes a potential life-saver!

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Marc, thanks for details. +1 –  rem Dec 28 '09 at 13:40
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I'm now on a development server, but on a production one I will for sure turn it on back. Thanks once again for sharing experience –  rem Dec 28 '09 at 13:49
    
But, for example, changing the size of a nvarchar column from 100 to 120 is very straightforward operation that could be easily done with ALTER TABLE... then, why is SQL Server (Management Studio) dropping and re-creating the table for such cases? –  Jaime Oct 30 '13 at 15:10
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@Jaime: that you need to ask the developers of that visual designer - no one else knows. It's just a fact - with the visual designer, many straightforward changes will always be done by re-creating the table and copying around. If you want to use the straightforward approach, it's up to you to handle it yourself by writing some easy T-SQL statements and executing them. –  marc_s Oct 30 '13 at 15:11
    
Thank You @marc_s This is exactly the answer I was expecting, though I had little faith in them having a hidden reason that would explain it all :) –  Jaime Oct 31 '13 at 13:37

Rather than unchecking the box (a poor solution), you should STOP editing data that way. If data must be changed, then do it with a script, so that you can easily port it to production and so that it is under source control. This also makes it easier to refresh testing changes after production has been pushed down to dev to enable developers to be working against fresher data.

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This is a risk to turning off this option. You can lose changes if you have change tracking turned on (your tables).

Chris

http://chrisbarba.wordpress.com/2009/04/15/sql-server-2008-cant-save-changes-to-tables/

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