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I just asked a question about how to check if the current line is blank or not in Perl.

That works for the current line, but how do I check to see if the next line is blank?

Text file to parse:(i need parse the text file and create a new XML file)

constant fixup GemEstabCommDelay = <U2 20>
    vid = 6
    name = "ESTABLISHCOMMUNICATIONSTIMEOUT"
    units = "s"
    min = <U2 0>
    max = <U2 1800>
    default = <U2 20>


constant fixup private GemConstantFileName = <A "C:\\TMP\\CONST.LOG">
    vid = 4
    name = ""  units = ""


constant fixup private GemAlarmFileName = <A "C:\\TMP\\ALARM.LOG">
    vid = 0
    name = ""
    units = ""  

I want the out put below.

<EquipmentConstants>
<ECID logicalName="GemEstabCommDelay " valueType="U2" value="20" vid="6" name="ESTABLISHCOMMUNICATIONSTIMEOUT" units="s" min="0" max="1800" default="20"></ECID>
<ECID logicalName="GemConstantFileName" valueType="A" value="C:\\TMP\\CONST.LOG" vid="4" name="" units=""></ECID>
<ECID logicalName="GemAlarmFileName" valueType="A" value="C:\\TMP\\ALARM.LOG" vid="0" name="" units=""></ECID>
</EquipmentConstants>
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3  
this has nothing to do with C#. Why did you add it as a tag? –  Eclipsed4utoo Dec 28 '09 at 12:45
    
@Eclipsed4utoo, Sorry, There are two project going at the same time. One is about parse XSD file to create a tree in C#; another project is about parse txt file (sample above) to create a XML file in perl. So i post some related questions here. and added a wrong tag (C#) for this post. apologized for my mistake. :-) –  Nano HE Dec 29 '09 at 0:48
    
are you asking for the "next line empty" thing because you want to use "empty line" as a token for end-of-record? –  anon Dec 29 '09 at 13:42
    
@Vokuhila, Yes, i want to use it as a token. –  Nano HE Dec 30 '09 at 2:57

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Let perl do it for you. Put the handle in paragraph mode:

$/ = "";  # paragraph mode
while (<>) {
    ...
}

Now in every iteration of the loop, $_ will contain an entire record, where each record is separated by two or more newlines.

See it in action:

#! /usr/bin/perl

use warnings;
use strict;

use 5.10.0;  # for named capture buffers and %+

my $equipconst = qr/
  ^
  constant \s+ fixup \s+ (?:private \s+)?
  (?<logicalName>.+?)  # non-greedy to right-trim whitespace
  \s+ = \s+
  < (?<valueType>\S+) \s+ (?<value>\S+) >
/x;

my $equipattr = qr/
    \s*
    (?<name>\S+)
    \s* = \s*
    (?<value>.+?)  # must be non-greedy!
/x;

# read from DATA rather than standard input/named arguments
# (used for demo purposes only)
*ARGV = *DATA;

print "<EquipmentConstants>\n";

$/ = "";
while (<>) {
  if (/$equipconst/g) {
    my @attrs = map [ $_ => $+{$_} ] =>
                qw/ logicalName valueType value /;

    # \G picks up where the last //g stopped
    while (/\G $equipattr (?=\s*$|$equipattr)/gx) {
      my($name,$value) = @+{ qw/ name value / };

      # discard tag, e.g., <U2 1800> becomes 1800
      $value =~ s/<.+ (.+)>/$1/;
      push @attrs => [ $name => $value ];
    }

    my $attrs = join " ",
                map {
                  # strip quotes if present
                  $_->[1] =~ s/^"(.*)"$/$1/;
                  qq{$_->[0]="$_->[1]"};
                }
                @attrs;

    print "<ECID $attrs></ECID>\n";
  }
}

print "</EquipmentConstants>\n";

__DATA__
constant fixup GemEstabCommDelay = <U2 20>
    vid = 6
    name = "ESTABLISHCOMMUNICATIONSTIMEOUT"
    units = "s"
    min = <U2 0>
    max = <U2 1800>
    default = <U2 20>


constant fixup private GemConstantFileName = <A "C:\\TMP\\CONST.LOG">
    vid = 4
    name = ""  units = ""


constant fixup private GemAlarmFileName = <A "C:\\TMP\\ALARM.LOG">
    vid = 0
    name = ""
    units = ""

Output:

<EquipmentConstants>
<ECID logicalName="GemEstabCommDelay" valueType="U2" value="20" vid="6" name="ESTABLISHCOMMUNICATIONSTIMEOUT" units="s" min="0" max="1800" default="20"></ECID>
<ECID logicalName="GemConstantFileName" valueType="A" value="C:\\TMP\\CONST.LOG" vid="4" name="" units=""></ECID>
<ECID logicalName="GemAlarmFileName" valueType="A" value="C:\\TMP\\ALARM.LOG" vid="0" name="" units=""></ECID>
</EquipmentConstants>

Note that it differs slightly from your spec: the first logicalName attribute does not contain whitespace.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi gbacon, I installed 5.10.1 just now. I ran the script and found it worked well except the loop function (while (<>) , i add a print "foo"; right after while(<>), the foo only print once.). The output only showed the 1st paragraph. (Closed to DATA). I can't find the root cause. –  Nano HE Jan 7 '10 at 15:50
    
Perl's <> reads from the files named on the command line or falls back to reading the standard input. Assuming the program is named const, the input is in const.dat, and that both are in the current directory, invoke the program as perl const const.dat >const.xml –  Greg Bacon Jan 7 '10 at 16:47
    
Hi gbacon, I followed the steps. 1st step. Cut the three paragraphs from the code and paste them to a empty my.data file then save the .data file; 2nd step. I commented the two lines in my local script: a. (# _DAT__); b. (# *ARGV = *DATA); 3rd step. Open window command line window. I am sure all my file (my.pl and my.data) located in the current directory. 4th. Run perl my.pl my.dat >my.xml; Still only 1st paragraph parsed. Are there any miss operations? (ActivePerl5.10.1 and winxp installed) –  Nano HE Jan 7 '10 at 23:55
    
@Nano Were you able to resolve this issue? –  Greg Bacon Feb 9 '10 at 14:23

Use separate variables to store the current and next lines:

$_ = <>;
while ($next_line = <>) {
    if ($next_line !~ /\S/) {
        # do something with $_ when next line is blank
    } else {
        # do something else with $_ when next line is not blank
    }
    $_ = $next_line;
}
# $_ now contains last line of file -- you may want to do something with it here
share|improve this answer
    
Alternatively (slightly cleaner IMHO, perhaps more memory intensive) you can read in the entire file into an array (@lines) and do for(0 .. $#lines). Current line: $lines[$_] Next line: $lines[$_+1]. But it depends. –  Chris Lutz Dec 28 '09 at 22:56

am not sure what you want, but i assume you want to display blocks that has "units=xxx" at the very end of each block. if not, describe your output clearly

$/ = "\n\n"; #set record separator
while (<>) {
    chomp;
    @F = split(/\n/, $_);
    if ($F[-1] =~ /units/) {
        print $_ ."\n";
    }
}

output

$ perl test.pl file

constant fixup private GemConstantFileName = <A "C:\\TMP\\CONST.LOG">
    vid = 4
    name = ""  units = ""

constant fixup private GemAlarmFileName = <A "C:\\TMP\\ALARM.LOG">
    vid = 0
    name = ""
    units = ""
share|improve this answer
    
Hi , I updated my post with what i want . –  Nano HE Dec 29 '09 at 1:00
use strict;
my @lines=<>; # slurp-in the whole file

for (my $i=0; $i<@lines-1; $i++) {
  print "line " .  ($i + 1) . " : next line is blank\n" if $lines[$i+1] =~ /^\s*$/;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I'd just do for(0 .. $#lines) (or $#lines - 1 if you don't want to process the last line). –  Chris Lutz Dec 28 '09 at 22:59
    
good point. I'm used to use @lines to evaluate in a scalar context. But $#lines might be better. –  anon Dec 28 '09 at 23:06
1  
This is terrible if the file is large. There is no need to slurp in the whole thing at once, when all that is important is the current and next line. –  Ether Dec 29 '09 at 0:28
    
@Ether et. Hi, My text file is very huge. It inclued about 56500 lines. –  Nano HE Dec 29 '09 at 1:03
1  
@Nano: 56500 lines isn't "very huge". But if performance is important you should mention that in your question. –  anon Dec 29 '09 at 6:29

If you don't care about memory usage, or the file you're reading is relatively small, you can just read the whole of it into an array.

@lines = <>;

for ($i = 0; $i < @lines; $i++)
{
    print "Current line blank" if ( "" eq @lines[$i]);
    print "Next line blank"    if ( "" eq @lines[$i + 1]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
You may start off with small data files, but useful programs tend to be pressed into service for other uses. Don't build in fragility when it's just as much work to avoid the risk. –  brian d foy Dec 29 '09 at 8:54

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