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I have a Java programming which displays the grid of 10x10 cells. In each cell I would like to draw a single character and have it take up the whole cell.

I am currently using the following code, but it isn't quite the right size.

graphics.setFont(new Font("monospaced", Font.PLAIN, 12));

for(int x = 0; x < GRID_WIDTH; x++) {
    for(int y = 0; y < GRID_HEIGHT; y++) {
        graphics.drawString(Character.toString(grid[x][y]), x * CELL_WIDTH, (y + 1) * CELL_HEIGHT);
    }
}

Is there any way in Java to draw a 10x10 (or CELL_WIDTHxCELL_HEIGHT) character?

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You need to calculate the individual character's width and height to determine what font size would actually fit within the cell. Because each font and each character of font has/can have different characteristics, this will change for each character and font. Take a read through Working with the text APIs for more details –  MadProgrammer Oct 30 '13 at 21:03
    
If this were my program, I'd use either a JLabel or a JTextField and give it a char of whatever font size is desired, and then let the layout managers decide on how to best size things. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Oct 30 '13 at 21:03
    
See java.awt.FontMetrics if you have a particular size in mind then you can find the right font size by adjusting the size in the right direction and then checking the height and width until you've approximated it sufficiently –  vandale Oct 30 '13 at 21:22
    
I'm more trying to figure out how to scale a character to be a square 10x10 than to find a font size that fits within that cell. –  DanielGibbs Oct 30 '13 at 23:37
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2 Answers

I build these methods in a project I happened to have open when reading this question =D. Do note that the method pickOptimalFontSize should be adapted for your specfic case. The default size is 130 which would likely be far to high for your case. You can tweak it as you need but this demonstrates the basics. In your case use them like this:

Font baseFont = new Font("monospaced", Font.PLAIN, 12);
for(int x = 0; x < GRID_WIDTH; x++) {
   for(int y = 0; y < GRID_HEIGHT; y++) {
       graphics.setFont(pickOptimalFontSize(graphics, Character.toString(grid[x][y]), CELL_WIDTH, CELL_HEIGHT, baseFont));
       drawString(graphics, Character.toString(grid[x][y]), x * CELL_WIDTH, (y + 1) * CELL_HEIGHT, "left", "center");
   }
}



public static void drawString(Graphics g, String str, double x, double y, String hAlign, String vAlign) {

    FontMetrics metrics = g.getFontMetrics();
    double dX = x;
    double dY = y;
    if(hAlign == null || "left".equals(hAlign.toLowerCase())) {
    } else if("center".equals(hAlign.toLowerCase())) {
        dX -= metrics.getStringBounds(str, g).getWidth()/2;
    } else if("right".equals(hAlign.toLowerCase())) {
        dX -= metrics.getStringBounds(str, g).getWidth();
    }


    if(vAlign == null || "bottom".equals(vAlign.toLowerCase())) {
    } else if("center".equals(vAlign.toLowerCase())) {
        dY += metrics.getAscent()/2;
    } else if("top".equals(vAlign.toLowerCase())) {
        dY += metrics.getAscent();
    }

    g.drawString(str, (int)dX, (int)dY);
}

private static Font pickOptimalFontSize (Graphics2D g, String title, int width, int height, Font baseFont) {
    Rectangle2D rect = null;

    float fontSize = 130; //initial value
    Font font;
    do {
        fontSize-=1;
        font = baseFont.deriveFont(fontSize);
        rect = getStringBoundsRectangle2D(g, title, font);
    } while (rect.getWidth() >= width || rect.getHeight() >= height);
    return font;
}

public static Rectangle2D getStringBoundsRectangle2D (Graphics g, String title, Font font) {
    g.setFont(font);
    FontMetrics fm = g.getFontMetrics();
    Rectangle2D rect = fm.getStringBounds(title, g);
    return rect;
}
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fm.getStringBounds seems to give odd results, as it gives a height of 10.47 for font size 9, but when I look at what is drawn, the height is 6 pixels. This results in the whole pickOptimalFontSize method picking a size that is way smaller than necessary. –  DanielGibbs Oct 30 '13 at 22:36
    
@DanielGibbs FontMetrics are very strange to work with, for some fonts they do not return perfect fits expecially if you are talking about a difference of 1px. Notice the loop in pickOptimalFontSize is incrementing by 1 size at a time. If you are going to work with those tiny increments you should set fontSize = 16;.....fontSize-=.2f; Try tweaking that method. Like I stated It was built for a specific project that called for large font sizes. With AWT you need to lower the numbers. –  ug_ Oct 30 '13 at 22:49
    
The increment isn't the issue. The issue is that the bounds returned by the font metrics are just wrong. They said a character had a height of 10.47 when it had a height of 6. –  DanielGibbs Oct 30 '13 at 23:10
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I found a solution that works as I wanted: I created a class called CharacterImageGenerator that generates (and caches) Images of characters. I then draw and scale these images whenever I want to draw a character.

public class CharacterImageGenerator {

    private FontMetrics metrics;
    private Color color;
    private Map<Character, Image> images;

    public CharacterImageGenerator(FontMetrics metrics, Color color) {
        this.metrics = metrics;
        this.color = color;
        images = new HashMap<Character, Image>();
    }

    public Image getImage(char c) {
        if(images.containsKey(c))
            return images.get(c);

        Rectangle2D bounds = new TextLayout(Character.toString(c), metrics.getFont(), metrics.getFontRenderContext()).getOutline(null).getBounds();
        if(bounds.getWidth() == 0 || bounds.getHeight() == 0) {
            images.put(c, null);
            return null;
        }
        Image image = new BufferedImage((int)bounds.getWidth(), (int)bounds.getHeight(), BufferedImage.TYPE_4BYTE_ABGR);
        Graphics g = image.getGraphics();
        g.setColor(color);
        g.setFont(metrics.getFont());
        g.drawString(Character.toString(c), 0, (int)(bounds.getHeight() - bounds.getMaxY()));

        images.put(c, image);
        return image;
    }
}

Which I then initialize with a large font to get decent looking characters.

// During initialization
graphics.setFont(new Font("monospaced", Font.PLAIN, 24));
characterGenerator = new CharacterImageGenerator(graphics.getFontMetrics(), Color.WHITE);

And then scale and draw to the size I want.

private void drawCharacter(int x, int y, char c) {
    graphics.drawImage(characterGenerator.getImage(c), PADDING + (x * TILE_WIDTH), PADDING + (y * TILE_HEIGHT), TILE_WIDTH, TILE_HEIGHT, null);
}
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