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I started exploring "Functional Programming" using Scala . I'd like to know how can we return a value in functional programming. I wrote a recursive function

def calculateSum(mainlist: List[Int]): Int = {
      def Sum(curentElem:Int = 0,thislist:List[Int],): Int = {
       if (list.isEmpty) curentElem
       else loop(curentElem + thislist.head, thislist.tail)
      //curentElem
     }
      Sum((List(0,1,2,3,4)))
      println ("returned from Sum : " + curentElem)

  }
  • Should I just add "curentElem" in the last line of the function (as I am doing in the commented line) !

UPDATE: I just solved the problem :

object HelloScala  {    
def main(args: Array[String]): Unit = {     
      val s = sum(0, List(0,1,2,3,4))
      println("returned from Sum : " + s )
    }  

def sum(currentElem: Int, thislist: List[Int]): Int = {
      thislist match {
        case Nil => currentElem
        case head :: tail => sum(currentElem + head, tail)
      }

    }
}
share|improve this question
    
You probably mean println (Sum .... )as currentElem is not defined outside the Sum function. –  Ingo Oct 30 '13 at 22:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you really want to print the result, then you can do it like that

def calculateSum(mainlist: List[Int]): Int = {
   def sum(currentElem: Int, thislist: List[Int]): Int = {
      if (thislist.isEmpty) curentElem
      else sum(currentElem + thislist.head, thislist.tail)
      //curentElem
   }
   val s = sum(0, mainlist)
   println("returned from Sum : " + s)
   s
}

If you don't:

def calculateSum(mainlist: List[Int]): Int = {
   def sum(currentElem: Int, thislist: List[Int]): Int = {
      if (thislist.isEmpty) curentElem
      else sum(currentElem + thislist.head, thislist.tail)
      //curentElem
   }
   sum(0, mainlist)
}

A way to use pattern matching (which you will use quite often in scala):

def calculateSum2(mainlist: List[Int]): Int = {
    def sum(currentElem: Int, thislist: List[Int]): Int = {
      thislist match {
        case Nil => currentElem
        case head :: tail => sum(currentElem + head, tail)
      }
    }
    sum(0, mainlist)
}

Nil is an empty List.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks ! I got a wired error : found.error: type mismatch; found : Unit required: Int println("returned from Sum : " + s); ^ one error found –  DataT Oct 30 '13 at 22:15
    
I made a few changes. Have a look. –  Kigyo Oct 30 '13 at 22:24
    
I just solved the problem, Take a look . –  DataT Oct 30 '13 at 23:14
    
The "problem" with that solution is that one can pass the initial value for the currentElem. e.g. I could call sum(1, mainlist) which would result in the sum + 1. You want currentElem to always be 0. Therefore do something like the calculateSum2, where there is only one parameter (the List). –  Kigyo Oct 31 '13 at 0:25

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