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Just a few days ago I found out about this miracle called CakePHP so I am pretty green to it. I need to build a mail application, so I have followed the convention and created:

Database description:

Table of users <user_id (primary key), fname, lname>.

Table of mails <mail_id(primary key), from (foreign key to user_id), to (foreign key to user_id), content, opened>.

My questions:

1) According to the convention, a foreign key should be called related table+'_id'. How should I call the columns if there are two foreign keys that relate to the same table. Like from and to in the mails table.

2) I would like to do an inner JOIN the between the two tables. Something like:

SELECT user_id, mail_id 
FROM users
INNER JOIN mails
ON users.user_id =mails.to AND mails.opened=false. 

But I have no clue how to do it.

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1  
While on the topic of conventions, you should name your primary keys simply id, not user_id and mail_id. :) –  deceze Dec 28 '09 at 23:22

2 Answers 2

When you need to do two relations to the same table, you will need to override the default convention. In your example, I would make 2 foreign keys. One named sender_id and one named recipient_id. Then you would join them in the Model like so:

<?php

class Mail extends AppModel {
    //The Associations below have been created with all possible keys, those that are not needed can be removed
    var $belongsTo = array(
        'UserSender' => array(
            'className' => 'User',
            'foreignKey' => 'sender_id',
            'conditions' => '',
            'fields' => '',
            'order' => ''
        ),
            'UserRecipient' => array(
            'className' => 'User',
            'foreignKey' => 'recipient_id',
            'conditions' => '',
            'fields' => '',
            'order' => ''
        ),
    );
}
?>

Then to do your conditions, you would reference them like so:

<?php
    $this->Mail->find(array('conditions'=>array('Mail.opened'=>false)));
?>

...and to filter on the sender and receiver, your conditions would look like:

<?php
    $this->Mail->find(array('conditions'=>array('UserSender.some_field'=>$someValue,
                                                'UserRecipient.some_field'=>$someValue)));
?>
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I'm not an expert myself, but following info on the CakePHP site will help you further: Multiple-relations-to-the-same-model

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hi, thanks for your response. i have seen the tutorial, in their examples they write Sample results from a $this->Recipe->find() call. but i am really clueless about what is written in Recipe->find() –  special0ne Dec 28 '09 at 14:06
    
then you may have experimented with the conplex find as well (book.cakephp.org/view/73/…). If this fails, you can use $this->Recipe->query($sqlStatement). –  jodorovski Dec 28 '09 at 14:30
    
The Recipe::find() function is inherited from the parent class, so you don't have to write it. It's written for you. If you mean the arguments that get passed to the function, those are very well documented in the manual. I'd recommend you do the Cake tutorial, start to finish, which should help you with these basic questions. –  Travis Leleu Dec 28 '09 at 16:32

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