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I'm trying to read a file based off the MSDN example for using fopen_s, but I keep getting an Access Violation error (I've even tried using the regular fopen but got the same message. The error points to err within my function and I don't see why this is an issue:

char* Foo::readFile(const char* filename)
{
    FILE* fp = NULL;
    errno_t err = fopen_s(&fp, filename, "r"); // error points to this line

    fseek(fp, 0, SEEK_END);
    long file_length = ftell(fp);
    fseek(fp, 0, SEEK_SET);
    char* contents = new char[file_length + 1];

    for (int i = 0; i < file_length + 1; i++)
    {
        contents[i] = 0;
    }

    fread(contents, 1, file_length, fp);

    contents[file_length + 1] = '\0';
    if (fp)
        err = fclose(fp);

    return contents;
}

And a revised version gives the same error:

FILE* fp = fopen(filename, "r"); // error again points to this line

fseek(fp, 0, SEEK_END);
long file_length = ftell(fp);
fseek(fp, 0, SEEK_SET);
char* contents = new char[file_length + 1];

for (int i = 0; i < file_length + 1; i++)
{
    contents[i] = 0;
}

fread(contents, 1, file_length, fp);

contents[file_length + 1] = '\0';
fclose(fp);

return contents;

My files reside in the Source Files as text1.txt and text2.txt. upon calling the function:

char* fileData1 = readFile("text1.txt");
char* fileData2 = readFile("text2.txt");
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2  
Are you sure filename is not NULL? –  Retired Ninja Oct 31 '13 at 0:38
    
I'm going to suggest that you (a) check the validity of filename, (if filename && *filename) for example) and (b) check the otherwise-useless error-code you are ignoring in err after attempting the open. As far as that goes, checking the results of all your library calls certainly wouldn't hurt. –  WhozCraig Oct 31 '13 at 0:49
    
I'll second that comment about checking filename for NULL, and also add that contents[file_length + 1] = '\0'; writes one byte past the end of the allocated block. –  Ken Y-N Oct 31 '13 at 1:27
    
@KenY-N I understand what you are saying, but the program won't let me get that far to even attempt to check. The files themselves do contain data. –  SpicyWeenie Oct 31 '13 at 2:12
    
Try this: File *fp = fopen(filename, "r"); assert(fp != NULL); –  Juniar Oct 31 '13 at 2:44
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