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We are required to create a program that can be used for the game "Secret Santa":

from random import *
people=[]
while True:
    person=input("Enter a person participating.(end to exit):\n")
    if person=="end": break
    people.append(person)


shuffle(people)
for i in range(len(people)//2):
    print(people[0],"buys for",people[1])

Here is the program I developed. As of right now, if I input 3 people (Ex. Bob, Ben, Bill) it will return "Ben buys for Bill" with no one buying for Ben or Bob. I am currently trying to get it to output "Bob buys for Ben, Ben Buys for Bill, Bill buys for Bob" but have had no success thus far. If someone could give me a hint/basis for setting this up it would be greatly appreciated. Also, if there are any errors in my code that are not allowing me to accomplish this, can you let me know? Thanks.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

First hint, it makes no sense to use constants like 0 and 1 instead of i inside your for loop.

for i in range(len(people)):
    print(people[i],"buys for",people[(i+1)%(len(people))])

However, this implementation will not give you all the possibilities offered by a Secret Santa.

Let's suppose you enter "Alice", "Bob", "Claire", "David", you'll never get to the situation where:

  • Alice buys for Bob
  • Bob buys for Alice
  • Claire buys for David
  • David buys for Claire

You will only get circular permutations, i.e.:

  • Alice buys for Bob
  • Bob buys for Claire
  • Claire buys for David
  • David buys for Alice

and alike.

You need some extra work to make a perfect Secret Santa :)

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1  
Technically correct, I suppose. But too predictable to be practical? –  Jon Carter Oct 31 '13 at 0:57
    
@JonCarter Did you see the call to shuffle in the OP's code? –  Jonathon Reinhart Oct 31 '13 at 0:58
    
Shuffle is not enough. @Jon is right, results are restrained to circular permutations. –  Benjamin Toueg Oct 31 '13 at 0:58
    
Thank you for your help guys! Greatly appreciated. –  D Shinas Oct 31 '13 at 1:01
1  
@btoueg: why is shuffle not enough? –  Tim Oct 31 '13 at 1:05

You are indexing 0 and 1, so it's always the first and second person being printed. What you really want is:

shuffle(people)
offset = [people[-1]] + people[:-1]
for santa, receiver in zip(people, offset):
     print(santa, "buys for", receiver)
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I think the second snippet won't do what the OP wanted. –  aIKid Oct 31 '13 at 0:56
    
You're right, it definitely didn't. I took it off, thanks. –  John Spong Oct 31 '13 at 17:46

Say you have three people: ['Bob', 'Ben', 'Bill'].

In [1]: people = ['Bob', 'Ben', 'Bill']

Right now, when you get the length of this list, you're doing floor-division by 2. This results in:

In [2]: len(people) // 2
Out[2]: 1

That's why you only get a single line of output.

How might you get the Secret Santa result you want? Here are some hints for an easy way to implement this:

  • You'll need some way of making sure two people don't get assigned to the same person and that a person doesn't get assigned to him- or herself.
  • That probably means a list of possible buyers and a list of possible recipients -- pull them off one by one and find matches for them, checking that people aren't being assigned to themselves.
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from random import *

prompt = "Enter a person participating.(end to exit):\n"
people = list(iter(lambda:input(prompt), "end"))

shuffle(people)
people.append(people[0])
for i in range(len(people) - 1):
    print(people[i],"buys for", people[i + 1])

Sample Run

Enter a person participating.(end to exit):
A
Enter a person participating.(end to exit):
B
Enter a person participating.(end to exit):
C
Enter a person participating.(end to exit):
end
A buys for B
B buys for C
C buys for A

You can replace

people=[]
while True:
    person=input("Enter a person participating.(end to exit):\n")
    if person=="end": break
    people.append(person)

with

prompt = "Enter a person participating.(end to exit):\n"
people = list(iter(lambda:input(prompt), "end"))

They both are doing the same thing. iter function will keep executing the function we pass as the first parameter, till the second value is matched.

And then, you do this

people.append(people[0])

Its a circular thing and the last person has to buy for the first person. append will insert at the last.

for i in range(len(people) - 1):

We do len(people) - 1, because if there are n people, there will be n buyings. In this case, we have added the first person at the last, so we subtract one. Finally

print(people[i],"buys for", people[i + 1])

every person has to buy for the next person in the list. So, people[i] buys for the people[i + 1].

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