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There are a lot of questions about null and in java.

What I am failing to grasp is what people mean by null is pointing to nothing or why to use null at all.

I can't understand the difference between

String thing = null;

and

String thing = "";

This question has detailed answers What is null in Java?, but I just can't wrap my head around it.

What am I missing?


languages I've studied (no expert)

Python, vb (vb.net), web programming (html, css, php, bit of js), sql

I should add, it is this answer http://stackoverflow.com/a/19697058/2776866 which prompted me to write this.

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1  
What other programming languages do you know? So we have a point of reference? –  PM 77-1 Oct 31 '13 at 2:02
    
@PM77-1 I'll edit it into the Q –  user2776866 Oct 31 '13 at 2:02
1  
From the languages you listed, it somewhat close to nothing in VB and not so close to NULL in SQL. –  PM 77-1 Oct 31 '13 at 2:14
    
If you understand C, this problem would be trivial. –  Siyuan Ren Oct 31 '13 at 2:15
    
@C.R. lol I wouldn't have asked a Q if i understood something that helped me to understand this lol sorry that was funny –  user2776866 Oct 31 '13 at 2:16

8 Answers 8

up vote 5 down vote accepted
String str = null;

means a String reference, named str, not pointing to anything

String str = "";

means a String reference, named str, pointing to an actual String instance. And for that String instance, it is a zero-length String, but it is still an actual object.


Just a little update with some diagram which hopefully can help you visualize that:

assume I have

String nullStr = null;
String emptyStr = "";
String myStr = "ab";

What it conceptually is something look like:

  // String nullStr = null;

  nullStr ----------> X    pointing to nothing



  // String emptyStr = "";
                      +------------------+
  emptyStr ---------> |       String     |
                      +------------------+
                      | length = 0       |
                      | content = []     |
                      +------------------+


  // String myStr = "ab";
                      +------------------+
  myStr ------------> |       String     |
                      +------------------+
                      | length = 2       |
                      | content = [ab]   |
                      +------------------+

(of course the internal structure of the String object is not the real thing in Java, it is just for giving you an idea)


More edit for the rationale behind NULL:

In fact in some language they do not provide concept of NULL. Anyway, in Java (or similar language), Null means semantically different from "empty" object. Use String as an example, I may have a People class with a String preferedTitle attribute. A Null preferedTitle means there is NO preferred title for that people (so that we need to derive and show the title for it, maybe), while a preferedTitle being an empty string means there IS a preferred title, and that's showing nothing.

Btw, although a bit off topic: concept of Null is seen as problematic for some people (because all those extra handling it need etc). Hence some languages (e.g. Haskell) are using some other ways to handle the situation where we used to use Null.

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This is the same thing written all over the net.. I am not understanding what this means.. sorry –  user2776866 Oct 31 '13 at 2:05
1  
Lemme draw a little ascii art and wish it help you visualize that, just a moment –  Adrian Shum Oct 31 '13 at 2:08
    
ty +1 but what is the point then of making anything null?? –  user2776866 Oct 31 '13 at 2:15
    
@Skippy: that's a good question. In fact in some language they do not provide concept of NULL. Anyway, in Java (or similar language), Null means semantically different from "empty" object. Use String as an example, I may have a People class with a String preferedTitle attribute. A Null preferedTitle means there is NO preferred title for that people (so that we need to derive and show the title for it, maybe), while a preferedTitle being an empty string means there IS a preferred title, and that's showing nothing. –  Adrian Shum Oct 31 '13 at 2:20
    
btw, concept of Null is seen as problematic for some people (because all those extra handling it need etc). Hence some languages (e.g. Haskell?) are using some other ways to handle the situation where we used to use Null. –  Adrian Shum Oct 31 '13 at 2:23

String str is a reference to an object. That is, it's not an actual object, but a variable which can contain the address of an object. When you assign a value to str you are changing the address stored within and changing which object it addresses.

null is reference value which points to no object. It's about as close to nothing as you can get. If you assign null to a String reference (String str = null;), you cannot then invoke any method of String using that reference -- all attempts will result in NullPointerException.

"" is a character String which contains no characters -- zero length. It is still an object, though, and if you assign its address to your String reference variable (String str = "";) you can then take its length, compare it to another String, extract its hashCode, etc.

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so why even use null?? –  user2776866 Oct 31 '13 at 2:12
    
Sometimes you want to indicate that there's nothing at all. Or you may initialize reference X to null and then execute a complex algorithm that is supposed assign a valid value to X. If the valid value never gets assigned you can detect that since X will be null. –  Hot Licks Oct 31 '13 at 2:15
    
Ah, do you want to put that in your answer?? it gives a good explanation.. because when people keep saying it means nothing and it sounds kinda useless, this is helpful, as it gives it a purpose –  user2776866 Oct 31 '13 at 2:19

Java doesn't really expose pointers, instead it deals with references.

When you say

String thing = null;

You are saying that there is a reference (of type string) called thing, which isn't referencing anything.

When you say

String thing = ""

This is shorthand for,

String thing = new String("");

Now you have an actual object initialized and ready to be used. You told the compiler to create a string and now your "thing" references the new string.

If you want to know the length of your initialized string, you can go;

thing.length

Which is zero. The string exists, but is zero length.

Trying string.length on the null version causes a NullReferenceException, which is the compiler saying

"I tried to find out about the length of your string, but I couldn't find it!"

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this, so far is the best explanation I have heard... for me I need it spelt out ty –  user2776866 Oct 31 '13 at 2:07
    
Can you please fix the capitalization of class String in your answer. Also, String x = "**"; and String x = new String("**"); are not exactly the same things, since they can produce different memory allocation. –  PM 77-1 Oct 31 '13 at 2:12
    
@PM77-1 No problem, I've been in .NET world too long, which doesn't care about string vs String. Your right about allocation, but I'm worried more about layman's terms than technically correct. –  Resorath Oct 31 '13 at 2:17
1  
@Skippy - They are all good answers (including this one). You just need to understand the difference between the object itself and a reference to this object. null is often used to signify that the object either has not been created yet or is no longer needed and should be available for garbage collection. –  PM 77-1 Oct 31 '13 at 2:27
1  
@Skippy, I think the two best answers here were posted by Adrian Shum and Hot Licks. Nothing really to choose between them. I guess Adrian's diagrams give him the edge. But what matters is what YOU found helpful - you asked the question, not I. –  David Wallace Oct 31 '13 at 2:44

Practically speaking, null means "not available for calling methods". If an object is allowed to be null, you must always check it for null before calling method on it.

An attempt to call any method on a null object is unconditionally an error. In nearly all cases it's a programming error, too, because you are supposed to either

  • Ensure that a variable is always non-null, or
  • Check a variable that could legally be null before calling methods on it.

On the other hand, an empty object lets you call methods. For example, you can find the length of an empty string - it is zero. You could also iterate a string, pass it to methods that expect non-null strings, and so on.

To visualize this, consider a Boolean object instead of a String. Unlike the primitive boolean that has only two states, namely true ("yes") and false ("no"), the Boolean object has three states:

  • Yes
  • No
  • Don't know

This third "don't know" state corresponds to null. It's neither true nor false state. Your program can use this third state to its advantage - for example, you can use comparison to null to see if a value has been set, or set a value to null to "unset" its value.

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your description of the boolean, with three states, it very good. between this and two of the other answers, I am going to digest it and I think I am comprehending it.. I think part of the problem has been, why make some be null, or non existent..?? if that makes sense?? –  user2776866 Oct 31 '13 at 2:28
    
"null means "not available for calling methods"" - not quite so. One still can call a STATIC method with casted null reference. Or you intentionally did not mention this so that not to make it more complicated? –  TT_ Oct 31 '13 at 2:37
    
@TT_ omg... now this is also something I need to know.. I am so behind on this.. I have an exam in a month and just have so much trouble with it –  user2776866 Oct 31 '13 at 2:43
1  
@Skippy Don't worry, after you master the basics it will be easier. Use SO and some book of Joshua Bloch. –  TT_ Oct 31 '13 at 2:55
2  
@TT_ Right, I did not want to bring static methods into this to avoid complicating the matters beyond what's necessary. –  dasblinkenlight Oct 31 '13 at 8:21

In Java null and an empty String are two different things.

If an String is null then you can not access its methods as it will throw a NullPointerException, however if a String is "" then the String object is valid and you can access its methods.

For example

 String a = null;
 String b = "";

 System.out.println (a.length());   // No Good
 System.out.println (b.length());   // Prints 0
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can you explain this a bit further?? I am sorry my brain is just not grapsing things –  user2776866 Oct 31 '13 at 2:05
1  
Updated for you –  Scary Wombat Oct 31 '13 at 2:10
    
ty userlottsa numbers, I +1 you and everyone else :) –  user2776866 Oct 31 '13 at 2:19

Let's compare this to Python. In Python, the equivalent to null is None.

>>> test = ""
>>> test1 = None

This is setting an empty string and a "null" string.

>>> test
''
>>> test1
None

In Python we can test nullity using is

>>> test is None
False
>>> test1 is None
True

We can test for empty strings using ==

>>> test == ""
True
>>> test1 == ""
False

null (like None) is the absence of a value.

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Conceptually null is a special value which means that the variable points to an invalid object, so it doesn't refer to anything valid in the sense that you can't access its content (variables or methods).

You can see it as a sort of special condition which has been added to languages because it was useful to be able to have pointers that refer to nothing. But there is some discordance here, in fact some languages prevent the necessity of a null value by forcing you to have just inizialized (meaningful) values.

There is difference in your example, "" is a valid object: it's an empty string while null is not a valid object.

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Ah which then lead to the answer of this Q stackoverflow.com/questions/19697003/… am I right?? –  user2776866 Oct 31 '13 at 2:11
1  
"the object points to an invalid object" - WHAT??? –  David Wallace Oct 31 '13 at 2:30
    
@DavidWallace part of my problem, is the explanations sometimes confuse me more than help me, which is why I posted a potential dup and very basic and humiliating Q, as it's like the person is speaking Dutch (I cannot speak Dutch) –  user2776866 Oct 31 '13 at 2:33
    
@DavidWallace: that is. The variables doesn't refer to a valid object, or refer to an invalid one, you can see it both ways. The concept of "doesn't refer to anything" is just the meaning you give to the null value itself, it doesn't mean absolutely anything since it refers to something, which is the null value itself. That is null is just a value and it stands for an uninitialised or undefined object, which is inherently invalid. –  Jack Oct 31 '13 at 3:09
    
No. A null variable does NOT refer to an invalid object. It does not refer to an uninitialised object. It does not refer to an undefined object. A null variable DOES NOT REFER TO ANY OBJECT AT ALL, valid or invalid, initialised or uninitialised, defined or undefined. By referring to an object "pointing to" something, your answer confuses the concept of a variable, with the concept of an object; which are precisely the concepts that the OP most needs to get straight, in order to understand this stuff. –  David Wallace Oct 31 '13 at 3:57

Although many object-oriented frameworks implement references with pointers, it is better to think of references not as "pointing to" objects, but rather as "identifying" them [personally, I like the term "object identifier" to describe references, since the term "reference" is somewhat overloaded in different contexts]. Although object identifiers are not human readable, one can imagine the system as giving each object an associated number starting at 1, and each class-type variable as either having an object number or a zero written on it. Since class-type variables and array slots default to holding zero, and there will never be a zeroth object, there's no danger that the default-valued variable of an uninitialized variable or array slot will identify a valid object.

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good to have another explanation and well put +1 –  user2776866 Nov 5 '13 at 2:15

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