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Okay, first off, fair warning, this is a project for a class. I am not looking for any help on it other than fixing my memory leak. I imagine I have followed some horrendous coding practices over the space of this C code. Regardless, when I run Valgrind to search for where the memory leaks are happening, it is not at all clear to me what memory leaks I am missing. I know that there are at least two strings that I am not freeing, but that I malloc()ed, based purely on the size of the valgrind output. Because I took some of the extraneous code out of the project, the valgrind line numbers, may very well be off, because of this I marked them with comments for your convenience.

A little background, I am writing the basic functions of a shell. It currently does the following:

1.Take user input

2.Parse the input into a cmdin struct

3.Execute the command, provided it doesn't have a pipe in it.

4.free the space from the cmdin I created, and start over at step 1. This is where the problem occurs.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/wait.h>
#define MAX_SIZE 1024
#define MAX_CLEN 2097152
#define READ_END 0
#define WRITE_END 1
#define CHILD_STATUS 0
struct cmdin
{
    char *cmd;
    char **args;
    int nargs;
    int pipeflag;
};

//check if the last argument of the command passed to it is a pipe.
//if so, return the position of the pipe, otherwise, return 0
//if it has already found a pipe, it will return the position of that pipe
int conpipe(struct cmdin * cmd)
{
    if(!cmd->pipeflag)
    {
        if(!strcmp(cmd->args[cmd->nargs], "|"))
        {
            return cmd->nargs;
        }
        else
        {
            return 0;
            /* PROBLEM LINE BELOW */
        }  // line 46, where valgrind claims one of the problems exists
    }
    else
    {
        //printf("pipeflag: %d\n", cmd->pipeflag);
        return (cmd->pipeflag);
    }
}

//free the command after each runthrough
int freeze(struct cmdin cmd)
{
    int i;
    for(i=0; i <= (cmd.nargs); i++)
    {
        //printf("cmd.args[%d]: %s\n",i, cmd.args[i]);
        /* PROBLEM LINE BELOW*/
        free(cmd.args[i]); //this is line 62, as noted by valgrind
    }
    free(cmd.args);
    free(cmd.cmd);
    return 0;
}

//parse input, and add a null to the end
struct cmdin * parse(char *cmd)
{
    //allocate space for the command 
    struct cmdin *ped = malloc(sizeof(struct cmdin)); 
    //declare pipeflag, and nargs as 0
    ped->pipeflag = 0;
    ped->nargs = 0;
    //allocate space for the array of strings, and for the string cmd.
    ped->args =  malloc(sizeof(char*) * MAX_SIZE);
    ped->cmd = malloc(sizeof(char) * MAX_SIZE);
    //scan the input, and put the first argument into the cmd string
    sscanf(cmd, "%s %[^\n]", ped->cmd, cmd);
    //allocate space for the next string, and then copy cmd to it.
    ped->args[ped->nargs] =  malloc(sizeof(char) * MAX_SIZE);
    strcpy(ped->args[ped->nargs], ped->cmd);
    ped->pipeflag = conpipe(ped);

    /* PROBLEM LINE BELOW*/
    ped->nargs++;     // line 86, where valgrind claims the second leak is called?
    ped->args[ped->nargs] =  malloc(sizeof(char) * MAX_SIZE);
    //loop that allocates space for a command, and then assigns
    //the next arg to it.
    while(sscanf(cmd, " %s %[^\n]", ped->args[ped->nargs], cmd) == 2)
    {
        ped->pipeflag = conpipe(ped);
        ped->nargs++;
        ped->args[ped->nargs] = malloc(sizeof(char) * MAX_SIZE);
    }

    strncpy(ped->args[ped->nargs], cmd, strlen(cmd)-1);
    ped->nargs++;
    //ped->args[ped->nargs] = malloc(sizeof(char) * MAX_SIZE);
    ped->args[ped->nargs] = NULL;

    return ped;

}

int main()
{
    char cwd[MAX_CLEN];
    getcwd(cwd, sizeof(cwd));
    char input[MAX_CLEN]; 
    char *exit  = "exit\n";
    char *cd = "cd";

    //Command to take input
    printf("tosh$ ");
    fgets(input, sizeof input, stdin);    

    while(strcmp(input, exit))
    {
       //Command to parse input
       struct cmdin *cmd;
       cmd = parse(input);
       //if there is not a pipeflag
       if(!cmd->pipeflag)
       {
            //Change directories
            if(!strcmp(cd, cmd->args[0]))
            {
                chdir(cmd->args[1]); 
                getcwd(cwd, sizeof(cwd));
            }
            else if(strcmp(input, exit))
            {
                //command to run input
                int child_pid;
                child_pid = fork();
                if(child_pid == 0)
                {
                    if(strcmp(cmd->args[1],cmd->args[0]))
                    {
                        execvp(cmd->cmd, cmd->args);
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        free(cmd->args[1]);
                        cmd->args[1] = NULL;
                        cmd->nargs--;
                        execvp(cmd->cmd, cmd->args);

                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    wait(&child_pid);
                }
            }
            freeze(*cmd);
            free(cmd);
        }       
        //Command to take input
        printf("tosh$ ");
        fgets(input, sizeof input, stdin);
    }
    return 0;
}

Note: the input for this valgrind, looked like this:

tosh$ ls -al
tosh$ exit

The valgrind Heap and Leak Summaries, are as follows:

HEAP SUMMARY:
==4901==     in use at exit: 4,096 bytes in 2 blocks
==4901==   total heap usage: 6 allocs, 4 frees, 24,600 bytes allocated
==4901== 
==4901== 2,048 bytes in 1 blocks are definitely lost in loss record 1 of 2 
==4901==    at 0x4C2B3F8: malloc (in /usr/lib/valgrind/vgpreload_memcheck-amd64-linux.so)
==4901==    by 0x400A48: parse (tosh.c:46)
==4901==    by 0x400C97: main (tosh.c:86)
==4901== 
==4901== 2,048 bytes in 1 blocks are definitely lost in loss record 2 of 2
==4901==    at 0x4C2B3F8: malloc (in /usr/lib/valgrind/vgpreload_memcheck-amd64-linux.so)
==4901==    by 0x400BDE: parse (tosh.c:62)
==4901==    by 0x400C97: main (tosh.c:86)
==4901== 
==4901== LEAK SUMMARY:
==4901==    definitely lost: 4,096 bytes in 2 blocks
==4901==    indirectly lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==4901==      possibly lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==4901==    still reachable: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==4901==         suppressed: 0 bytes in 0 blocks

UPDATE: As per request. My Makefile:

CC=gcc
CFLAGS=-g -Wall
TARGET=tosh

$(TARGET): $(TARGET).c
    $(CC) $(CFLAGS) -o $(TARGET) $(TARGET).c

Valgrind Version: valgrind-3.7.0

gcc Version: gcc (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.7.2-2ubuntu1) 4.7.2

echo $LD_PRELOAD:

(This printed nothing)

share|improve this question
    
All heap blocks were freed -- no leaks are possible. However, you've freeing your memory only if !cmd->pipeflag, and you have a lot of wrong memory reads/writes (valgrind memcheck will list them all) –  keltar Oct 31 '13 at 4:55
1  
Yes. But with the code you've provided it reports no leaks. Are you 100% sure you're executing the same version? –  keltar Oct 31 '13 at 5:08
1  
your valgrind results look out of date. rebuild your code and make sure you debug the right application. –  Andreas Grapentin Oct 31 '13 at 5:41
1  
@DerekHalden by line numbers i mean your comments like 'this is line 86'. First, it isn't - in given example. Second, leak cannot occure in ped->nargs++ - this operation doesn't allocate or modify pointer. Third, you're never allocating 2048 bytes within a single block, so i still think we talking about different source code. From what i see, i cannot reproduce your problem (no leaks here, with given input commands), but lines free(cmd->args[1]); cmd->args[1] = NULL; cmd->nargs--; inside fork branch are wrong for sure (most likely not related to your issue, but still incorrect). –  keltar Oct 31 '13 at 6:01
1  
Not able to reproduce. Only a couple of comments. 1. I like to use -Wextra -pedantic and even -std=c89 or 99 when appropriate (In addition to -Wall). Can't see any help in this here though. 2. In your code you do not have a single check on malloc. I would have added a helper function that validates the requested memory. (Check that return is != NULL and could even write a test byte at offset 1. (to ensure it isn't a false positive.)) and write appropriate error message on fault. –  Sukminder Oct 31 '13 at 6:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Okay, I just figured out what the problem is. Most of the commentors were right. It was that I was running valgrind on different source code. I have been keeping a copy of tosh in my ~/usr/bin (which is in my $PATH). I forgot to update that piece of code with the my most recent changes (including the ones that fixed my memory leak problems).

When I ran valgrind I used the following command from the directory containing tosh.c tosh:

$ valgrind tosh

What I should have run was:

$ valgrind ./tosh

When I made the update to my command, the code ran fine with no memory leaks. Thank you for all of your help! Sorry it took me so long to figure this out.

share|improve this answer

Have not managed to reproduce. But a couple of notes.

  1. Use what you have available of error and warnings.

    gcc -Wall -Wextra -pedantic …
    
  2. Check return values and success of operations. This is imperative for reducing bugs, especially those that only a user case a mile down the road reveals.


if (!(foo = malloc(size))) {
    perror("mem");
}

...


/* This line is no good: */
sscanf(cmd, "%s %[^\n]", ped->cmd, cmd);
/*      |                           |
 *      +----------+----------------+
 *                 |
 *                 +--- Not good. UB. (Input / Output same.)
 */

You could add a routine to get count and sizes ...

i = sscanf(cmd, "%s%n %[^\n]%n", ped->cmd, &n1, cmd, &n2);

if (i < 2) {
    /* Debug print. */
    fprintf(stderr, 
            "%s:%-3d; "
            "sscanf => %d items and %d bytes str[%d]<%s>\n", 
            __FILE__, __LINENO_,
            i, n2, n1, ped->cmd
    );
}

etc.

share|improve this answer

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