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Consider this class

class SomeObject
{
        private int x;
        public int X
        {
            get { return x; }
            set { x = value+z; }
        }

        private int y;
        public int Y
        {
            get { return y; }
            set { y = value+z ; }
        }

        private int z;
        public int Z
        {
            get {return z;}
            set { z = value+y ; }
        }
    }

When I do something like

var r = new SomeObject() {X = 1, Y = 1, Z = 1 };
Console.WriteLine(r.X + " " + r.Y + " " + r.Z);

var r1 = new SomeObject() { Y = 1, X = 1, Z = 1 };
Console.WriteLine(r1.X + " " + r1.Y + " " + r1.Z);

var r2 = new SomeObject() { Z = 1, X = 1, Y = 1 };
Console.WriteLine(r2.X + " " + r2.Y + " " + r2.Z);

The console outputs

1 1 2
1 1 2
2 2 1

Is there a way to fix this behaviour other than using the constructor?

The right output shall be 2 2 2

every answer was helpful but i can't marke them all as best answer

share|improve this question
1  
Well it works good, as when you are initalizing particular variables the others are 0, and I'm not really sure it's possible, but you could try to bind them using INotifyPropertyChanged, so they could adapt to most actual value of each variable, after every change. For more information about this interface check: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms743695.aspx –  Tafari Oct 31 '13 at 8:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Instead of storing the value with the dependent variable, you could always compute it only in the getter. This way the order they get set wouldn't matter. For example

    private int y;
    public int Y
    {
        get { return y +z; }
        set { y = value ; }
    }

and similar for the other properties.

However I must add that what you're trying to achieve through properties is counter-intuitive and can be problem for any other programmer coming across this.

share|improve this answer
    
does this also mean less memory usage? –  FPGA Oct 31 '13 at 8:34
    
@user1492051 No this wouldn't have any implication on the memory usage. You're still storing values in separate variables. Do you have any reason to worry about the memory usage? What exactly are you trying to do? –  hawk Oct 31 '13 at 8:35
    
no was just wondering –  FPGA Oct 31 '13 at 8:37
    
could you please explain why its counter-intuitive? –  FPGA Oct 31 '13 at 8:41
1  
Normally setter and getter go together as pairs. Setter is supposed to be a place to do validation (and raise exceptions) or do necessary computation. However as another commenter has pointed out getter should normally return the value that was set. In some rare cases you might in your class decide to ignore the value that was set - for example Height = 300 when MaxHeight = 200. You may ignore the setter. But to always return a different value for a getter from the set value is quite unusual. –  hawk Oct 31 '13 at 8:43

This is terrible, don't modify value in set accessor.

If I set value Y = 10 I'd like to see that 10 back.

I would do something like this with readonly properties

public int XModified
{
    get { return x + z; }
}

and so on.

share|improve this answer

There is no problem. Perfectly correct behavior. When you're setting Z first it will work as you expect. Otherwise Z is 0 while you're setting other properties and value + Z == value.
Just use constructor:

public SomeObject(int x, int y, int z)
{
   this.x = x + z;
   this.y = y + z;
   this.z = z + y;
}

You can always use named parameters:

var r = new SomeObject(x: 1, z: 1, y: 1);
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