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i have a issue with some string formats, i'm forcing the culture when formatting specific formats:

get { return String.Format("{0:###,###,###,###,##0}", Convert.ToDecimal(_monthPay, new System.Globalization.CultureInfo("es-ES"))); }

so that i can get this:

$300.000,01

On localhost it works fine, but when i publish to the server, i get this:

$300,000.01

I don't know why!!! I don't have access to the server, so I can't change the regional settings on the server; is there another way to solve it? so that i works properly on localhost and when publishing?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
what server? What language? Questions seems to be incomplete. –  Priyank Dec 28 '09 at 16:20
    
You ought to tag this with C# for it to get attention from the audience best able to answer it. –  Adam Crossland Dec 28 '09 at 16:20
    
How is this related to currency? –  SLaks Dec 28 '09 at 16:27
    
your current format string will also truncate your decimals. You'd need to add ...##0.## or ...##0.00 to the end in order to not drop those digits. –  Bananamansam Dec 28 '09 at 16:34

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What you're doing here is telling the Convert.ToDecimal function what _monthPay will look like. What you're expecting is that the String will be formatted with the culture info.

You should be telling String.Format what culture to use:

String.Format( new System.Globalization.CultureInfo("es-ES"), "{0:###,###,###,###,##0.##}", Convert.ToDecimal(_monthPay)));
share|improve this answer

You're passing the CultureInfo in the wrong place.

By passing the CultureInfo to Convert.ToDecimal, you're telling Convert.ToDecimal to convert the number using that culture. (This is relevant if _monthPay is a string and needs to be parsed)
However, you didn't pass a CultureInfo to String.Format, so it is still using the default culture.

By the way, you should only use String.Format if you're combining multiple values. In your case, you should call the ToString overload. Also, your format string is needlessly long; you can simply write #,0. If you want to include a currency symbol, you can simply use C instead.

Therefore, you should write Convert.ToDecimal(_monthPay).ToString("#,0", new System.Globalization.CultureInfo("es-ES")).

share|improve this answer
    
You can also pass the CultureInfo as the first argument to String.Format: String.Format(new CultureInfo("es-ES"), "{0:###,###,###,###,##0}", value) –  Phil Ross Dec 28 '09 at 16:27
    
Yes, but he shouldn't be using String.Format in the first place. –  SLaks Dec 28 '09 at 16:30
    
Honestly he doesn't need the huge format string either. He can replace it with a single "C" to get a currency format. –  Scott Anderson Dec 28 '09 at 16:31
    
He doesn't (seem) to want a currency symbol. –  SLaks Dec 28 '09 at 16:33
Thread.CurrentUICulture = CultureInfo.GetCultureInfo("es-ES");

Try putting that in some initialization block.

share|improve this answer
get 
{ 
    var culture = new System.Globalization.CultureInfo("es-ES");
    return Convert
        .ToDecimal(_monthPay, culture)
        .ToString("###,###,###,###,##0", culture); 
}
share|improve this answer

Instead of using the really long custom format, what about the built-in format for currency?

get { return Convert.ToDecimal(_monthPay).ToString("C", new System.Globalization.CultureInfo("es-ES")); }

EDIT: moved the culture info.. I still don't think using some massive format string is right. There are built-in format conventions for currency...

share|improve this answer
    
@SLaks Don't be so scared to down-vote. Do your part. –  Josh Stodola Dec 28 '09 at 16:25

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