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I am using a pre-built third party class library (think .NET Framework...) that contains a class Foo with the following members:

public sealed class Foo {
  private object _state;
  public Foo(object state) { _state = state; }
}

Foo does not contain a public _state setter.

In a specific scenario, I want to set the state of a Foo object to the object itself.

This will NOT compile:

Foo f;
f = new Foo(f);   // Compilation error: Use of unassigned local variable 'f'

Given the above prerequisites, is there any way that I can set the state of a Foo object to the object itself?


Rationale The Timer class in Windows 8.1 does not contain the Timer(AsyncCallback) constructor which assigned the state of the Timer object with the object itself. I am trying to port .NET code that contains this Timer constructor to a Windows 8.1 class library, so my concern is How do I pass the object itself to its state member? This issue is further outlined here, but I thought it would be more efficient to also pose the principal question above.

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Shouldn't you initialize f before using it as an argument ? –  Réda Mattar Oct 31 '13 at 11:52
    
@RédaMattar That would work, however, it would be a separate instance of Foo() not the instance itself. –  gleng Oct 31 '13 at 11:53
    
@RédaMattar Even if it was initialized, Foo doesn't have an overload that takes an instance of Foo as a parameter. –  bump Oct 31 '13 at 11:56
    
Can you unwrap reference from something else? For example: Handler handler = new Handler(); Foo newFoo = new Foo(handler); handler.f = newFoo; –  Eugene Oct 31 '13 at 12:09
    
@Eugene In my scenario, yes, since I am using the state in a callback that I implement myself. However, in the general case the Foo class would not know that state was a wrapper, so it would potentially not be able to act correctly on state. –  Anders Gustafsson Oct 31 '13 at 12:46
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Just having Foo, this isn't possible. You may introduce a facade/proxy object and pass this to the constructor code, that way you can wire things up:

public class FooFacade  {
    private Foo foo;
    public void SetFoo(Foo f) { foo = f; }

    // for each property:
    public X Y { get { return foo.Y; } }
}

Then you can use this facade:

FooFacade ff = new FooFacade();
Foo f = new Foo(ff);
ff.SetFoo(f);

Of course this isn't what you wanted in the first place. The drawback of this attempt is that the state of the object is limited to it's public representation.

With reflection, just for completeness:

// create an uninitialized object of type Foo, does not call constructor:
var f = (Foo)FormatterServices.GetUninitializedObject(typeof(Foo));

// get field:
var stateField = typeof(Foo).GetField("_state", BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.GetField | BindingFlags.Instance);

// set value to instance itself, invoke on f:
stateField.SetValue(f, f);
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Using reflection like this I will make myself dependent upon the implementation of the third-party Foo class. Ideally, I would like to use an approach that is only dependent upon the API. –  Anders Gustafsson Oct 31 '13 at 12:36
    
@AndersGustafsson sure, that is right. –  Matten Oct 31 '13 at 12:37
    
@AndersGustafsson maybe another attempt in my answer. –  Matten Oct 31 '13 at 12:49
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Workaround:

var foo = new Foo(/*params*/);
var fieldInfo = foo.GetType().GetField("_state", BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance);
fieldInfo.SetValue(foo , foo);
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1  
fieldInfo.SetValue(a, a);? Did you mean fieldInfo.SetValue(foo, foo);? –  sloth Oct 31 '13 at 12:04
    
@大师燈XiHuan: Yeah, fixed. –  Dmitry Martovoi Oct 31 '13 at 12:06
    
Using reflection like this I will make myself dependent upon the implementation of the third-party Foo class. Ideally, I would like to use an approach that is only dependent upon the API. –  Anders Gustafsson Oct 31 '13 at 12:35
1  
The Timer class in Windows 8 is not a .NET class, so this will not work. –  Kris Vandermotten Oct 31 '13 at 13:21
    
@KrisVandermotten: WAT? how relate Timer with my post? –  Dmitry Martovoi Oct 31 '13 at 16:34
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If I understand your intention correctly you want a timer whose callback references the timer itself.

Timer timer = null;
timer = new Timer(() => {
 timer.Stop(); //sample
});

Creating an object is done through the newobj instruction which atomically allocates and invokes the constructor. Without cooperation from the ctor you cannot get a reference to the unconstructed object. So there's no other way that either this approach, or reflection.

You can extract the above code into a helper method, make timer a local variable and then every timer callback will close over its own private and unchanging variable.

Timer CreateTimer(Action<Timer> callback) {
    Timer timer = null;
    timer = new Timer(() => {
     callback(timer);
    });
}
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Thanks, @usr, but this will only be a safe approach as long as I do not re-define timer, right? If I move the reference to another object and re-define timer, the callback will act on the wrong object, will it not? var timer2 = timer; timer = new Timer(...); –  Anders Gustafsson Oct 31 '13 at 13:46
1  
Yes, that is just a question of closure scope. You can extract the above code into a helper method, make timer a local variable and then every timer callback will close over its own private and unchanging variable. See my edit. –  usr Oct 31 '13 at 13:59
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So as I understand it, you don't want to pass the object itself as the constructor parameter; you want to pass a lambda that depends on the object. Would that be correct?

In that case, a not-pretty-but-workable workaround would be to add a layer of indirection:

Action callback = null;
var timer = new Timer(() => {
    if (callback != null)
        callback();
});
callback = () => {
    // do something
    // do something with timer
}

So you'd be passing a lambda to the constructor -- that lambda is valid at the point you call the constructor, although it's not valid to call it yet because it depends on the callback variable being set. Then you immediately set the callback variable to the implementation you want, which can now safely refer to timer.

If you're using a timer that fires on a background thread, then there's a possible race condition, where the timer could fire before you initialize your callback variable to a non-null value; hence the null check inside the lambda. For timers that fire on the UI thread, that race condition doesn't exist, and the null check could be omitted.

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as far as I can tell, I can't pass the object itself to the constructor. The approach you are suggesting here also requires timer to no be re-initialized, right? More elaborate answers for the Timer question have also "popped" up some minutes ago, please have a look here. –  Anders Gustafsson Oct 31 '13 at 12:53
    
I don't know what you mean about "requires timer to no be re-initialized". The timer is initialized once. –  Joe White Oct 31 '13 at 13:14
    
In your example, yes. But what if I a few lines down move timer to another object and re-define timer? var timer2 = timer; timer = new Timer(...); Then the callback method would act on the wrong Timer object. –  Anders Gustafsson Oct 31 '13 at 13:36
    
Well, sure, that's why you wouldn't do that. Mutable variables are problematic enough to begin with, but they're even worse once you start using functional programming. If it hurts, don't do it. –  Joe White Nov 1 '13 at 3:17
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