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I have two tables, omc_categories and omc_products.

I want to pull out categories name where omc_proudcts.category_id is equal to omc_categories.id.

I created the following sql but I am not sure which is right one.

SELECT C.Name AS CatName
   FROM omc_categories AS C
   LEFT JOIN omc_products AS P
     ON C.id = P.category_id
   WHERE P.category_id = $category_id
     AND p.status = "active"

or

SELECT C.Name AS CatName
   FROM omc_products AS P
   LEFT JOIN omc_categories AS C
     ON C.id = P.category_id
   WHERE P.category_id = $category_id
     AND p.status = "active"

Can anyone tell me which one right (if there is any) and why please. I am confused with join.

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `omc_categories` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `name` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `shortdesc` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `longdesc` text NOT NULL,
  `status` enum('active','inactive') NOT NULL,
  `parentid` int(11) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM  DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 AUTO_INCREMENT=43 ;

and

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `omc_products` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `name` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `shortdesc` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `longdesc` text NOT NULL,
  `thumbnail` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `image` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `class` varchar(255) DEFAULT NULL,
  `grouping` varchar(16) DEFAULT NULL,
  `status` enum('active','inactive') NOT NULL,
  `category_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
  `featured` enum('true','false') NOT NULL,
  `price` float(4,2) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM  DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 AUTO_INCREMENT=74 ;

--UPDATE--

Sample data of omc_categories

INSERT INTO `omc_categories` (`id`, `name`, `shortdesc`, `longdesc`, `status`, `parentid`) VALUES
(21, 'Front top', 'front top', '', 'active', 4),
(20, 'Galleri 2', 'Galleri 2', '', 'active', 4),
...
(41, 'Trær', '', '', 'active', 27),
(42, 'newfolder', '', '', 'active', 27);

Sample data of omc_products

    INSERT INTO `omc_products` (`id`, `name`, `shortdesc`, `longdesc`, `thumbnail`, `image`, `class`, `grouping`, `status`, `category_id`, `featured`, `price`) VALUES
(1, 'Doggie', 'Cappelen forlag: New Flight', 'Doggie from New flight.', 'images/newflight_doggie_small.jpg', 'images/newflight_doggie_big.jpg', 'new-flight', 'imagebox-new', 'active', 5, 'false', 0.00),
(2, 'Jinnie', 'New flight Jinnie', '', 'images/newflight_jinnie_small.jpg', 'images/newflight_jinnie_big1.jpg', 'new-flight', 'imagebox-new', 'active', 5, 'false', 0.00),
...
...
(73, 'new image', '', '', 'images/daffodil_big.jpg.jpg', 'images/daffodil_big.jpg', '', '', 'active', 42, 'false', 0.00);

For example last line id 73 has 42 of category_id.

I want to pull out name of category "newfolder" from omc_categories.

share|improve this question
1  
Could you please post some sample data and the resultset you'd like to get? –  Quassnoi Dec 28 '09 at 18:02
    
Updated. Thanks. –  shin Dec 28 '09 at 18:23
    
@shin: you want to pull out the category name given product id 73? Or given category id 42? Or you want to pull out category names for all products? Please be more specific on what is the input to your program. –  Quassnoi Dec 28 '09 at 22:03

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The issue with your statements, as Arthur Thomas points out, is that a left join will include all rows from the left table, using NULLs as values for the columns coming from the right table when the ON clause fails. A plain (inner) join will only include rows for which the ON clause succeeds.

SELECT DISTINCT C.Name AS CatName
   FROM omc_categories AS C
   JOIN omc_products AS P
     ON C.id = P.category_id
        AND P.category_id = $category_id
   WHERE p.status = "active"

Note you can include constant expressions in the ON clause, which reduces the size of the join (no point in adding rows you later remove).

Be careful about how you're building the statement. You don't want it vulnerable to SQL injection.

share|improve this answer

If your looking to pull the categories name where omc_proudcts.category_id is equal to omc_categories.id the following should do that for you (unless I'm missing something...):

SELECT C.Name AS CatName
   FROM omc_categories AS C
   INNER JOIN omc_products AS P
     ON C.id = P.category_id
   WHERE p.status = "active"

INNER JOIN is saying JOIN these tables where these two values equal each other (identical to "WHERE C.id = P.category_id")

share|improve this answer

Most probably, you want this:

SELECT  name
FROM    omc_categories
WHERE   id IN
        (
        SELECT  category_id
        FROM    products
        WHERE   status = 'active'
        )
        AND id = $id

This will return category's name if there are active products in this category, nothing otherwise.

share|improve this answer
    
Mmmm, this is new to me who are beginner. It seems like a recursive. Is this different from using join? –  shin Dec 28 '09 at 17:55
    
you want to use IN like above because your LEFT JOIN in your first query would give you all categories and this is not what you want. LEFT JOINS returns all results for the relation on the left side (excluding where clause exceptions of course). You could add DISTINCT to the "SELECT category_id" as well to reduce the set size. –  Arthur Thomas Dec 28 '09 at 17:57
    
Just be careful about IN and subqueries. If poorly written, the subquery will be executed for each row in the outer query; the AND id=$id in the above means there's only one row from the outer query, so this isn't a problem. –  outis Dec 28 '09 at 18:41

First of all, they are both wrong for $category_id is undefined.

Secondly, if you remove the line

WHERE P.category_id = $category_id

(which is excessive) they will both be right and would be different in result unless you had category_id NOT NULL. Since it cannot be null, they're just the same. As well as inner join or outer join.

BTW it would be nice if you told instructed the database that category_id is in fact a foreign key ;)

share|improve this answer
    
MyISAM tables ignore FOREIGN KEYs. –  outis Dec 28 '09 at 18:16
    
and what about the rest of the answer? ;) –  Antony Hatchkins Dec 28 '09 at 19:22
    
$category_id is a stand-in; ? or :category_id would do just as well. Since the OP is asking about the SQL query, rather than why a query is failing when run from an unspecified host language, whether or not $category_id is defined doesn't apply. The WHERE line can't be removed because then the AND p.status = "active" expression would result in a syntax error. Removing the P.category_id = $category_id\n AND results in a different query; it is not excessive. Whether it should be removed depends on what the OP is trying to find. –  outis Dec 28 '09 at 20:27

You want to use an inner-join..the simplest way to reconstruct your query is this:

SELECT C.Name AS CatName
   FROM omc_categories AS C
   INNER JOIN omc_products AS P
     ON C.id = P.category_id
   WHERE P.category_id = $category_id
     AND p.status = "active"

The inner join is going to give the intersection between the two tables, on the ID that is common to the two tables (id in the categoris, category_id in products).

A better way to solve your problem (show all the categories that have an active product) is this:

SELECT C.Name AS CatName
   FROM omc_categories AS C
   where exists (Select * from omc_products AS P where p.categoryID = c.id)

This is similar to the in statement.

If you wanted to know how many products you have per category, try this:

SELECT C.Name AS CatName, count(p.*), sum(case when p.status = "active" then 1 else 0 end) as numActiveProducts
   FROM omc_categories AS C
   left outer JOIN omc_products AS P
     ON C.id = P.category_id 
group by c.name
share|improve this answer
1  
The second statement has the worst performance. What sense of the word "better" do you mean? –  outis Dec 28 '09 at 18:44
    
Better in the sense that I would want to know what categories have been used in any product. "worst performance" is relative. The last query is probably the "worst performer" of the ones I've posted. –  Rob Dec 28 '09 at 18:51
    
I'm still not understanding what sense of the word "better" you're using. "[W]hat categories have been used in any product" could describe the result of either query. Do you mean "clearer", as in the SQL statement is closest to the English description of the query? –  outis Dec 28 '09 at 20:21
    
Not true. The 1st query is parametrized on $category_id and status="active", so you're only going to get back a result based on that one $category_id. The second query tells you any category that is used in a product. The third query tells you the counts of products used per category (including 0) as well as the count of active products. –  Rob Dec 28 '09 at 20:45
    
The first query has an additional filter, true, but both return categories that have some product. My point is that "what categories have been used in any product" doesn't point out a sense of the word "better" that explains how the second query is better than the first. "More direct translation", "clearer", "simpler" and "faster" are all senses of the word "better" that could be applied to queries. –  outis Dec 28 '09 at 21:02

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