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Some background for this question may be helpful: I have multithreaded application written in C++, in which memory management is critical point in terms of performance. I have already 'main' allocator implemented, let's assume it's called 'ManagedAllocator'. I have also my own, multi-platform thread local storage support, written in asm using fs CPU register. So basically, now my global operator new looks like this:

void* operator new(Size_t memSize)
{
  Thread_data& tls = get_thread_local_data();
  ManagedAllocator* allocator = tls[TLS_INDEX_MANAGED_ALLOCATOR];
  return allocator->AllocateMemory(memSize);
}

Creation and destruction of local instance of allocator is performed by each thread. That works really nice and ultra-fast, compared to standard allocators (already tested on Win7/8, Linux, MacOS and WP8 (for which implementation of TLS is sligthly different).

Now, the problem: I have following class:

template < Size_t Alloc_size >
class FixedPoolAllocator
{
};

This class was used internally by ManagedAllocator, but recently it turned out that I will need to use it also as a standalone allocator. I cannot, however, do it the same way as with ManagedAllocator, because I would need to use one slot in TLS array for each specialization of FixedPoolAllocator.

I do not want, however, to play with locks, because the whole thing is to have lock-free allocations. Is there a way to do this in a clean, elegant way?


* UPDATE *


I forgot to mention one thing: what I really need to do.

I have simple class:

template < class Allocator >
class EXS_INTERFACE CustomAllocObject
{
public:
  explicit CustomAllocObject();
  ~CustomAllocObject();

  static void* operator new(Size_t memSize);
  //also new[], placement versions, etc.

  static void operator delete(void* memPtr);
  //same as above
};

which simply does:

template < class Allocator >
_EXSTemplateDef void*
CustomAllocObject<Allocator>::operator new(Size_t memSize)
{
  return Allocator::AllocateMemory(memSize);
}

I use this to create objects that need fast allocation:

class Image : public CustomAllocObject< FixedSizeAllocator<sizeof(ImageInternal)> >
{
};

AllocateMemory() is static function in each allocator class. So perfect solution would be:

template < Size_t Alloc_size >
_EXSTemplateDef void*
FixedPoolAllocator<Alloc_size>::AllocateMemory(Size_t memSize)
{
  FixedPoolAllocator<Alloc_size>* alloc = get_somehow_this_threads_instance();
  return alloc->PerformAllocation();
}

The problem is, I cannot do this:

template < Size_t Alloc_size >
class FixedPoolAllocator
{
  //....
  static EXS_THREAD_LOCAL FixedPoolAllocator<Alloc_size> _local_instance;
};

because library is compiled to DLL. FixedPoolAllocator is DLL_EXPORT class in this case (which means all it's static members also are) and DLL_EXPORTed THREAD_LOCALs are not allowed.

share|improve this question
    
Why don't you use thread_local ? – PlasmaHH Oct 31 '13 at 13:27
    
I updated question to explain why thread_local (aka __thread or __declspec(thread)) is not a solution. – Mateusz Grzejek Oct 31 '13 at 13:52
    
I don't know about __declspec(thread) but gccs __thread is actually a bit different than the c++ thread_local keyword. But if your implementation does not support that keyword, well... – PlasmaHH Oct 31 '13 at 13:55
    
You misundestood my explanation: EXS_THREAD_LOCAL is defined as __thread on gcc, __declspec(thread) on MSVC, etc. Read last 2 lines of my question - the problem is, that library is compiled to DLL. – Mateusz Grzejek Oct 31 '13 at 13:57
    
As I said, __thread and thread_local are not the same on gcc, and I don't know about __declspec(thread) but I would assume that it is not the same as thread_local as thread_local is nowhere defined to not work within dlls. But when your implementation does not (fully) support thread_local, its worthless talking about it, but if it does, you should try that instead. – PlasmaHH Oct 31 '13 at 15:02

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