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I want to break out of an else if condition where it has an inner if condition, if the inner if condition inside becomes true like below, please suggest me a way.

 if(condition1=true){

        }
    else if(condition2=true){

           if(condition3=true){

              do activity 1;
              //I want to break here if condition3 is true, without executing activity 2 & 3
            }

          do activity 2;
          do activity 3;

    }
share|improve this question
3  
use return;.... – Ali Alamiri Oct 31 '13 at 14:30
    
I hope that = is for the sake of the example and not instead of == (Which shouldn't even exist). – Maroun Maroun Oct 31 '13 at 14:31
    
@MarounMaroun just only if(conditionN) – nachokk Oct 31 '13 at 14:33
    
Put an else block after "condition3=true" with do activity2 and 3 in it – Bob Flannigon Oct 31 '13 at 14:33
    
Umm... what about an else for if(condition3)? – Gamb Oct 31 '13 at 14:35
up vote 5 down vote accepted
else if(condition2){
       if(condition3){
              do activity 1;
              //I want to break here if condition3 is true, without executing activity 2 & 3
        }
        else
        {
              do activity 2;
              do activity 3;
        }
}
share|improve this answer

Others already answered with restructuring the blocks. If checking of conditions don't need to happen in sequence, you can do-

if(condition3=true){
    do activity 1;
} else if(condition2=true){
    do activity 2;
    do activity 3;
} else if(condition1=true){

}
share|improve this answer

In java you can use break only in loop for or while or switch/case or named blocks

But you if you have method void you can write return;

Something like:

void foo(){

if(condition1=true){

        }
    else if(condition2=true){

           if(condition3=true){

              do activity 1;

              return;
            }

          do activity 2;
          do activity 3;

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
True, tough return will end the execution of the method. It would be a valid option if there's no logic after the if. – Gamb Oct 31 '13 at 14:32
    
"In java you can use break only in loop for or while or switch/case." Wrong. You can also break out of named blocks. – Smallhacker Oct 31 '13 at 14:40
    
@Smallhacker can you show me example please? or reference? – Maxim Shoustin Oct 31 '13 at 14:43
    
@MaximShoustin Random example I found: gist.github.com/andy-morris/1441082 – Smallhacker Oct 31 '13 at 14:45
    
nice, i never used block names. good to know, added to answer – Maxim Shoustin Oct 31 '13 at 14:48

Well, you could go for an else statement.

...
if(condition3=true){
    do activity 1;
} else {
    do activity 2;
    do activity 3;
}
...

Or, if you prefer, you can extract that entire block of code to a separate function and have it return right after activity 1.

I think you could also use a named block:

...
doActivities:{
    if(condition3=true){
        do activity 1;
        break doActivities;
    } else {
        do activity 2;
        do activity 3;
    }
}
...

However, that's dangerously close to an outright goto and is probably not recommended.

share|improve this answer

No need for break. This should do it.

if(condition1=true){

} else if(condition2=true){
    if(condition3=true){
        do activity 1;
        //I want to break here if condition3 is true, without executing activity 2 & 3
    } else {
        do activity 2;
        do activity 3;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

In fact, I would try the way that is easier to read:

if(condition1)
{

}
else if(condition2 && condition3) {
      do activity 1;

}
else if(condition2 && !condition3) {
      do activity 2;
      do activity 3;
}

This way you avoid nested ifs and keep your code very easy to read.

share|improve this answer

If-else patterns like this strongly hint at having some class structure to handle the cases.

Activity activity = ActivityFactory.getActivity(conditionCause);
activity.execute();
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