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I have two sections(primary and secondary) in a form with several textboxes which display information. On the secondary section I've added a checkbox (which when checked) I want to copy the information from the fields on the primary section into the fields on the secondary side. If its unchecked I want it to leave the field as blank.

Here is some sample code to help see what I am trying to do:

The CheckChanged event calls four different methods (each method contains logic for a specific checkbox):

    private void CheckBoxCheckedChanged(
    {
        Method1();
        Method2();
        Method3();
        Method4();
    }

When Method4 is called I'd like to process the logic mentioned above if its checked, and leave blank if its not.

    private void Method4()
    {
        if (checkBox4.Checked = true)
        {
            secondaryTextbox.Text = primaryTextbox.Text;
        }
        else if (checkBox4.Checked = false)
        {
            secondaryTextbox.Text = ""; 
        }

    }

The issue I'm having is that when I do this once the checkbox is checked, I can no longer 'uncheck' to change the field back to being blank.

What am I doing wrong, or is there a better way to go about this?

I apologize ahead of time if I posted this wrong, this is my first time using SO.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The code you wrote makes an assignment (=) inside the if statement's expression, but this is not what you mean. You should use == if you want to make a comparison. Or even better, just do this instead:

    if (checkBox4.Checked)
    {
        secondaryTextbox.Text = primaryTextbox.Text;
    }
    else
    {
        secondaryTextbox.Text = ""; 
    }

As Paolo pointed out the code you tried gives a compiler warning. If you try to never write code that produces warnings you can catch simple errors like this more quickly. There's even an option to treat warnings as errors which you can use.

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+1. I thought VS gave you a compiler warning on use of = when you cleary mean ==...? –  Paolo Dec 28 '09 at 19:06
    
Yes actually, I just checked it and you're right. –  Mark Byers Dec 28 '09 at 19:08
    
Thank you, I figured it would be something simple. And thanks to all the other below who answered as well. –  user234702 Dec 28 '09 at 19:08
    
@Paolo - It does. Both as a green underline and a message in the Error List window (assuming you're showing Warnings) –  ChrisF Dec 28 '09 at 19:09

You need

if (checkBox4.Checked == true)

to check if true, the way you were doing it was always assigning it the value "true"

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You are doing assignment when you mean to be testing

use this

if (checkBox4.Checked == false)

or better this

if (false == checkBox4.Checked)

or even better this

if ( ! checkBox4.Checked)

instead of this

if (checkBox4.Checked = false)
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You have a very small problem in your code:

you are using = instead of ==

also it is better to define an array of check-box and text-box instead of func1,func2,func3,func4

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You are using a single "=" to test of the checkbox is checked. THis has the effect of setting the checkbox state.

Use "==", as in

if (checkBox4.Checked == true)

or in fact, much better:

if (checkBox4.Checked)
share|improve this answer
    
Though in C# the use of "=" results in a compiler warning. –  ChrisF Dec 28 '09 at 19:03

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