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i am using a common method for all my $.ajax.post operations, and it is encoding the payload differently per use.

for example, if

data: someJSObject

it gets posted as JSON.

however, if i define the object (i also tried putting properties in 'quotes': val)

data: { mgrID: 0, strId: 0, strName: 'Bowie' }

this gets converted to a url encoded string

mgrID=250411&strId=1006575&strName=Bowie

my post function

$.ajax({
        type: 'POST',
        contentType: 'application/json; charset=utf-8',
        dataType: 'json',
        url: url,
        data: data,

in chrome console, i can see the object recognized as valid json before post.

share|improve this question
    
I think he wants to write inline json parameters but he doesn't want them to each be their own url var, but to have their nice braces so the whole "post" can be decoded in one json_decode type of thing. –  AwokeKnowing Oct 31 '13 at 17:36
    
could you elaborate a little more? which is your server side language? –  naveen Oct 31 '13 at 17:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are confusing javascript objects and json. If you want to send json, you must give jquery json.

data: { mgrID: 0, strId: 0, strName: 'Bowie' } is not json.

This is json:

data: '{ "mgrID": 0, "strId": 0, "strName": "Bowie" }'

Note how now i'm assigning a string to data rather than an object.

You can convert an object into json using JSON.stringify(theobject)

data: JSON.stringify({ mgrID: 0, strId: 0, strName: 'Bowie' })
share|improve this answer
    
ah, that's it, good call :) –  Sonic Soul Oct 31 '13 at 18:09
    
+1: concise, but covers the topic well! –  naveen Oct 31 '13 at 18:23
    
part of the confusion is due to the framework automatically converting js objects into json. for example i can pass regular js objects and they are automatically serialized & deserialized on asp.net mvc server side.. for some reason this is not working when passing json notation of js objects –  Sonic Soul Oct 31 '13 at 18:35
    
well, there's the problem, server-side they aren't js objects, they are asp structures or whatever they're called in ASP. Then, when you return that to the browser to be interpreted by the browser, it's converted to json, javascript(probably jquery in this case) then converts that json into a javascript object. To get it back into ASP, you have to perform that operation backwards. Convert the js object to json, send it to asp, then asp converts the json into an asp structure. The confusion comes from the first half of that happening behind the scenes. –  Kevin B Oct 31 '13 at 18:37
    
Kevin, you're missing my point. i can pass regular js objects to $.ajax post, and the whole serialization (to json, and out to c# objects on the server) happens automatically. i don't have to call JSON.stringify. For some reason this doesn't work when declaring anonymous js object like in my question. –  Sonic Soul Oct 31 '13 at 18:43

try to stringify it like this:

 data: JSON.stringify(data)
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Looking at your previous posts I assume that you have a ASP.NET / C# background and hence this answer.

In ASP.NET we have something called auto-serialization.

Suppose if you have a class like this

public class Person
{
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
    public int Age { get; set; }    
}

and you have a web-service, controller or whatever that has a method like this

public bool AddPerson(Person person)

You could pass the JavaScript object serialized into a json string like this

var DTO = {
    person: {
        FirstName: "Hugh",
        LastName: "Jackman",
        Age: 10
    }
};
$.ajax({
    type: 'POST',
    contentType: 'application/json',
    dataType: 'json',
    url: url,
    data: JSON.stringify(DTO)
}).done(function () {
    console.log("I passed an object");
});

And when you go to the server-side method AddPerson and put a break-point on it. Then you will see that the json string has been automatically de-serialized as an object of the Person class.

This way you can also pass an array of persons which you can retrieve as List<Person>

P.S: JSON.stringify is present in all modern browsers. For older ones, use this fallback.

Update: If the server-side method accepts three parameters like this

public bool AddPerson(string firstName, string lastName, int age)

Then change your DTO like this

var DTO = {
    firstName: "Hugh",
    lastName: "Jackman",
    age: 10
};

and use the same AJAX call.

Please read this if you have time. Using complex types to make calling services less… complex

share|improve this answer
    
@SonicSoul IE8 and IE9 support JSON.stringify. –  Kevin B Oct 31 '13 at 18:09
    
part of the confusion is due to the framework automatically converting js objects into json. for example i can pass regular js objects and they are automatically serialized & deserialized on asp.net mvc server side.. for some reason this is not working when passing json notation of js objects –  Sonic Soul Oct 31 '13 at 18:36

to post "as json" try

data: (tempobj={my: "data",is: "json"})

or

data: {mypost:{my: "data",is: "json"} }

in the second case you can look for the mypost var in your server code.

share|improve this answer
    
my server accepts 3 separate parameters. –  Sonic Soul Oct 31 '13 at 17:49
    
did the first option not do what you wanted? meaning allow you to creat the parameters in place, with an anonymous object? –  AwokeKnowing Oct 31 '13 at 17:51
    
the second one is invalid, and with the first one, why did you create tempobj? In either case, neither of them are sending json to the server, therefore neither of them will solve the problem. –  Kevin B Oct 31 '13 at 17:58
    
@SonicSoul the obj he used is a sample. you obviously need to replace it with your data. –  Kevin B Oct 31 '13 at 17:58
    
my bad it asctually was meant to be created in place, forgot the outer {} for the second option. –  AwokeKnowing Oct 31 '13 at 18:02

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