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I want to redirect my copy operator to my copy constructor. Where in the latter I implement the proper logic for copying/contructing a new class based on the old avaialble class.

However, how is the proper way to do this? I "think" this one is maybe leaking memory, but I don't know how to do it without passing a pointer:

MyClass& MyClass::operator=(const MyClass& a) {
    MyClass* b = new MyClass(a); 
    return *b; 
}

Is this OK? If is not, what would be the proper way? Should I change the body of the method or the prototype?

Thank you.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As a rule, a copy assignment operator should never create a copy. Rather, it should copy data into the existing object that it's called on (the left-hand side of the assignment). For example:

class MyClass
{
public:
    MyClass & operator = (const MyClass & RHS)
    {
        // Copy data from RHS into 'this'
        m_value = RHS.m_value;
        return *this;
    }

private:
    int m_value;
};

In this case, defining your own copy constructor isn't necessary because the default (compiler-provided) one would work fine. It's just an illustration though.

Unfortunately you can't invoke the copy constructor on the existing object. The copy-swap pattern is an alternative, but it can be less efficient.

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1  
Copy-swap is nice because it gives you exception-safety: if your copy-constructor throws then your object is still in a valid state. –  bstamour Oct 31 '13 at 17:47
    
Exactly what I needed ! I was missing the fact that the operator = is called on the left side class. return *this is just for future use of the asigned object by another operator. –  DarkZeros Nov 1 '13 at 10:49

No, an operator= should set the current object attributes to be the same as the object assigned. Your method assigns a new object on the heap, returns it as a reference (essentially leaking it) and leaves the object the operator was called on completely unchanged.

You should implement a method called, for example, CopyFrom(), which assigns all the object's attributes to match those of the passed in object (deep copying any heap allocated pointers whose lifetime is managed by MyClass) and then call THAT from both your copy constructor and your operator=.

    class MyClass
    {
    public:
        MyClass( const MyClass& in )
        {
            CopyFrom( in );
        }

        MyClass& operator=( const MyClass& in )
        {
            CopyFrom( in );
            return *this;
        }

    private:
        void CopyFrom( const MyClass& in )
        {
            ... copies in's attributes into self.
        }
    };
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1  
Telling it short, the operator = is called on the left-side (asigned) class instance. So, you have to copy the in object to this. And return that instance (just in case it is used ie: a = (b = c) + 2) –  DarkZeros Nov 1 '13 at 10:44

Unless you're storing pointers inside of MyClass, the correct copy assignment operator is the default-generated one. If, however you need to implement one, you can write it in terms of your copy-constructor via the copy-swap idiom:

MyClass& MyClass::operator = (MyClass const& a) {
    MyClass temp(a); // Call the copy constructor
    using std::swap;
    swap(temp, *this);
    return *this;
}

The reason for the using std::swap is to enable argument-dependent lookup. If you define your own swap function for MyClass, it will be called. Else std::swap will be used as a fallback. (EDIT: You do in fact need to implement a custom swap in this case, or else you will get infinite recursion. std::swap will use the assignment operator, which will call std::swap, which will call the...)

The reason that this idiom is well-liked is because std::swap is a no-throw function. If your copy-constructor were to throw an exception, then your object you're assigning to is still in a valid state.

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1  
You are pretty much obliged to implement swap for MyClass to prevent infinite recursion! –  anatolyg Oct 31 '13 at 19:01
    
Hrm yes this is true. –  bstamour Oct 31 '13 at 23:04
    
I don't have pointers, but I have HW handlers (they act like pointers). So I DO have to implement this copy behaviour manually. And I don't want to swap, but create a 1:1 copy, creating the HW handlers with the same settings as the old ones. –  DarkZeros Nov 1 '13 at 10:47
    
Swapping in this case is totally the safe way to do this: you're copying into a temporary and then swapping it with *this. What happens is that since swap is a no-throw, all the work is done in your copy ctor, and at the end of this function, the old *this is destroyed, since it's now in the temporary variable. –  bstamour Nov 1 '13 at 12:23

The "proper way" is to implement the assignment operator like an assignment operator: modify the contents of the object on which the operator is being called and return a reference to it.

Your current implementation will result in a memory leak, AND doesn't do any assignment (which is the main point of the assignment operator).

If you only want to write the assignment code once, and your class doesn't allocate memory in the constructor, you could do this:

    MyClass::MyClass(const MyClass& a) {
        *this = a;
    }

    MyClass& MyClass::operator=(const MyClass& a) {
        if (&a == this)
            return *this;
        // Do assignment
        return *this;
    }

But I wouldn't recommend it.

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Why wouldn't you recommend calling the copy assignment from the copy constructor? Is it likely to cause a problem? –  Peter R. Bloomfield Oct 31 '13 at 17:46
    
@PeterR.Bloomfield Say you later add a member to the class which is dynamically allocated. In the copy constructor, you would need to allocate the memory AND copy the value (possibly using a copy constructor of the object being allocated). But in the assignment operator you can assume the object already has been allocated so you just need to copy it. This is just one example where the copy constructor and assignment operator end up being different; you could have plenty more complicated cases. –  Taylor Brandstetter Oct 31 '13 at 17:49

Your code is totally wrong (sorry)! The assignment operator does not assign anything, but allocates a pointer to a MyClass object, creating a memory leak. My advice: avoid pointers or use some smart pointer (shared_ptr, unique_ptr), but that is just a side note.

Maybe this is helpful:

#include <iostream>
#include <limits>

class X
{
    public:
    X(std::size_t n)
    :   m_size(n), m_data(new int[n])
    {
        std::cout << "Construct" << std::endl;
    }

    ~X()
    {
        std::cout << "Destruct" << std::endl;
        delete [] m_data;
    }

    // Exception safe assignment.
    // Note: I am passing by value to enable copy elision and
    //       move semantics.
    X& operator = (X x) {
        std::cout << "Assign" << std::endl;
        x.swap(*this);
        return *this;
    }

    void swap(X& x) {
        std::swap(m_size, x.m_size);
        std::swap(m_data, x.m_data);
    }

    std::size_t size() const { return m_size; }

    private:
    std::size_t m_size;
    int* m_data;
};

int main()
{
    X x(1);
    try {
        x = X(2);
        // To provoke an exception:
        std::size_t n = std::numeric_limits<std::size_t>::max();
        x = X(n);
    }
    catch(...) {
        std::cout << "Exception" << std::endl;
    }
    std::cout << "Size: " << x.size() << std::endl;
    return 0;
}
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Does your assignment operator inhibit the creation of the default copy/move assignment operators? Technically you're not defining the correct operator, so... –  bstamour Oct 31 '13 at 18:55
1  
@bstamour: [12.8] Copying and moving class objects 17: A user-declared copy assignment operator X::operator= is a non-static non-template member function of class X with exactly one parameter of type X, X&, const X&, volatile X& or const volatile X& –  Dieter Lücking Oct 31 '13 at 19:02
    
Thanks for the reference. –  bstamour Oct 31 '13 at 23:08

If you absolutely want to implement the assignment operator by copy constructor, use the following:

MyClass& MyClass::operator=(const MyClass& o)
{
    this->~MyClass(); // destroy current object
    new(this) MyClass(o); // use the copy constructor
    return *this;
}

I cannot think of any situation in which this would be the best thing to do (other answers describe ways of implementation that are better in some situations).

Maybe (just trying to make things up here) if MyClass contains hundreds of int/float fields, and several dynamically-allocated pointers?

  • Duplicating them in constructor and assignment operator is too tedious and error-prone
  • Having a copying function that both constructor and assignment operator call - not ideal, because pointers have to be set to NULL first
  • The code above - will work with no additional effort!

However, having bare (non-smart) pointers in your class is discouraged. If you have such a class, then you have far worse problems than non-working assignment operator - you have to refactor first, and the problem will go away, together with all other bugs.

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This answer fits to Halloween! Actually it is not better than the traditional approach if(this != &s) { ... }: Not exception safe and no benefit. –  Dieter Lücking Oct 31 '13 at 19:23
    
@DieterLücking The benefit here is that you don't need to write the stuff inside the {...}. And yeah, it's not exception-safe (I guess only copy-and-swap is). –  anatolyg Oct 31 '13 at 19:45

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