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I wrote this simple Test class to see how Java evaluates boolean algebra at the Bytecode level:

public class Test {

    private static boolean a, b;

    public static boolean method1(){
        return !(a || b);
    }

    public static boolean method2(){
        return !a && !b;
    }
}

If you simplify method1() using DeMorgan's Laws, you should get method2(). After looking at the Bytecode (using javap -c Test.class), it looks like:

Compiled from "Test.java"
public class Test {
    public Test();
    Code:
            0: aload_0
    1: invokespecial #1                  // Method java/lang/Object."<init>":
            ()V
    4: return

    public static boolean method1();
    Code:
            0: getstatic     #2                  // Field a:Z
            3: ifne          16
            6: getstatic     #3                  // Field b:Z
            9: ifne          16
            12: iconst_1
    13: goto          17
            16: iconst_0
    17: ireturn

    public static boolean method2();
    Code:
            0: getstatic     #2                  // Field a:Z
            3: ifne          16
            6: getstatic     #3                  // Field b:Z
            9: ifne          16
            12: iconst_1
    13: goto          17
            16: iconst_0
    17: ireturn
}

So my question is, why is method1() and method2() exactly the same at the Bytecode level?

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2  
This may be a dumb comment.. but the two methods produce the same result, though in a different way of writing it. Your question is why the bytecode is the same, isn't that obvious? –  abmitchell Oct 31 '13 at 17:56
11  
Uhhh, you answered this question yourself. The two expressions are the same, so the compiler optimized them the same. It's probably slightly faster to execute the method2 version than the method1 version so that's where the compiler aims. –  dcsohl Oct 31 '13 at 17:56
2  
@dcsohl But why does method1 look like method2 as opposed to method2 looking like method1? Why do you think method2 has a slightly faster execution time as opposed to method1? –  Josh M Oct 31 '13 at 17:58
3  
@abmitchell: I have yet to see a compiler that turns { List t = new List(); for (int i = 0; i < 1000; ++i) { t.add(i); } int r = 0; for (int i = 0; i < 1000; ++i) { r += t[i]; } return r; } into simply { return 499500; }. –  Joker_vD Oct 31 '13 at 18:03
2  
I wouldn't necessarily call this a compiler "optimization," in that this is just the way the compiler compiles boolean expressions -- and the branching involved in conditional ANDs and ORS -- to Java bytecode generally. –  Louis Wasserman Oct 31 '13 at 18:26

5 Answers 5

up vote 33 down vote accepted

What your seeing is a compiler optimization. When javac encounters method1() it applies an optimization (based on De Morgan's Laws as you pointed out but also short circuiting the && comparison) that allows it to branch early if a is true (thus no need to evaluate b).

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2  
good answer, especially the branch early statement. –  AlexWien Oct 31 '13 at 18:00
2  
In method1 though, couldn't it also branch early if a is true, because there would be no need to evaluate b? –  jlars62 Oct 31 '13 at 18:02
    
@jlars62 It's easier for the compiler to distribute the NOT so that the first comparison can be represented as a single bytecode ifne (value is not zero/false), which if it succeeds branches to instruction 16 immediately skipping the other comparison. –  Dev Oct 31 '13 at 18:07
    
@Dev OP didn't state that he is using javac. It can by any other Java compiler, for example ECJ (Eclipse Compiler for Java). –  Adam Stelmaszczyk Oct 31 '13 at 18:50
    
@jlars62 it can branch early if a is true and, in fact, it does so. ifne means “branch if true” and if a compiler implements the a||b using ifne both can jumps can target the same code representing the outer not which is implemented by just swapping the iconst_1 and iconst_0 instructions. And that’s what it is all about: the result is exactly the same code as for method2. The compiler does not need to transform one code to another; implementing the boolean expression just works that way, the same logic generates the same code. –  Holger Nov 1 '13 at 20:12

Why is method1 and method2 the same at the Bytecode level?

You have very much answered this question yourself by pointing out the equivalence of the two methods if one applies De Morgan's transformation to it.

But why does method1 look like method2 as opposed to method2 looking like method1?

This assumption is not correct: it's not that method1 looks like method2 or method2 looks like method1: rather, both methods look like some methodX, which looks like this:

public static boolean methodX() {
    if (a) {
        return false;
    }
    return !b;
}

Both methods are simplified to that logic due to short-circuiting. The optimizer then merges the two ireturn branches by inserting the gotos to different labels.

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1  
+1 Very helpful information, thanks. –  Josh M Oct 31 '13 at 18:20
1  
Shouldn’t it be if(a) return false;? Without the not? –  Holger Nov 1 '13 at 20:04
    
@Holger You are right, the ! should be removed. Thanks for the correction! –  dasblinkenlight Nov 1 '13 at 20:08

As you said, both methods express the same math. How a specific compiler produces bytecode is up to the compiler author, as long as it is correct.

It is not at all certain that the compiler applied DeMorgan's law. It seems to me that there may be simpler optimization techniques that would result in the same optimization.

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2  
+1 for pointing out that It is not at all certain that the compiler applied DeMorgan's law. –  Adam Stelmaszczyk Oct 31 '13 at 18:52

Because your Java compiler is optimizing (using short-circuit evaluation) both methods to the same bytecode:

0: getstatic     #2 // static boolean a
3: ifne          16 // if a != 0 jump to 16 (return false)
6: getstatic     #3 // static boolean b
9: ifne          16 // if b != 0 jump to 16 (return false)
12: iconst_1        // push int value 1 on the top of the stack
13: goto         17
16: iconst_0        // push int value 0 on the top of the stack
17: ireturn         // return an int from the top of the stack
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Well in short the complier optimized it. To explain it futher: This is how ifne opcode is explained:

ifne pops the top int off the operand stack. If the int does not equal zero, execution branches to the address (pc + branchoffset), where pc is the address of the ifne opcode in the bytecode and branchoffset is a 16-bit signed integer parameter following the ifne opcode in the bytecode. If the int on the stack equals zero, execution continues at the next instruction.

So this is the sequence:

 load a
 if a == 0 (i.e. false) then load b 
    else then jump and return iconst_0 (false)
 if b is loaded and b == 0 then return iconst_1 (true)
    else return false
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