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EDIT: See better benchmark below in second post !!!

I did some performance tests with .NET 4.5 vs Mono 3.2.x on (Win8.1, Linux, BSD and OSX).

TAKE NOTE: These tests were compiled with either Mono x86 or .NET x86 arch. They were not running in Virtual Box. The test computer was triple booted with "Win8/Linux/BSD" running natively and the Mac dual booted with "OSX/Win7". Also note the "WIN32" compiler directive ONLY was used on Win8/Win7 for "TimeBeginPeriod" to force accurate Stopwatch accuracy in Windows. Linux/BSD/OSX does not need this, but windows does.

Here is the test code:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using System.Diagnostics;

using numf = System.Single;
using numi = System.Int32;

#if WIN32
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
#endif

namespace Benchmarks
{
    struct Vector4
    {
        public numf X, Y, Z, W;

        public static Vector4 operator+(Vector4 p1, Vector4 p2)
        {
            p1.X += p2.X;
            p1.Y += p2.Y;
            p1.Z += p2.Z;
            p1.W += p2.W;
            return p1;
        }

        public static Vector4 operator-(Vector4 p1, Vector4 p2)
        {
            p1.X -= p2.X;
            p1.Y -= p2.Y;
            p1.Z -= p2.Z;
            p1.W -= p2.W;
            return p1;
        }

        public static Vector4 operator*(Vector4 p1, Vector4 p2)
        {
            p1.X *= p2.X;
            p1.Y *= p2.Y;
            p1.Z *= p2.Z;
            p1.W *= p2.W;
            return p1;
        }

        public static Vector4 operator/(Vector4 p1, Vector4 p2)
        {
            p1.X /= p2.X;
            p1.Y /= p2.Y;
            p1.Z /= p2.Z;
            p1.W /= p2.W;
            return p1;
        }

        public override string ToString()
        {
            return string.Format("{0}, {1}, {2}, {3}", X, Y, Z, W);
        }
    }

    class Program
    {
        #if WIN32
        [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
        public struct TimeCaps
        {
            public uint wPeriodMin;
            public uint wPeriodMax;
        }

        private static TimeCaps caps;

        [DllImport("winmm.dll", EntryPoint="timeGetDevCaps", SetLastError=true)]
        public static extern uint TimeGetDevCaps(ref TimeCaps timeCaps, uint sizeTimeCaps);

        [DllImport("winmm.dll", EntryPoint="timeBeginPeriod", SetLastError=true)]
        public static extern uint TimeBeginPeriod(uint uMilliseconds);

        [DllImport("winmm.dll", EntryPoint="timeEndPeriod", SetLastError=true)]
        public static extern uint TimeEndPeriod(uint uMilliseconds);

        public static void OptimizedMode()
        {
            caps = new TimeCaps();
            if (TimeGetDevCaps(ref caps, (uint)System.Runtime.InteropServices.Marshal.SizeOf(caps)) != 0)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("StopWatch: TimeGetDevCaps failed");
            }

            if (TimeBeginPeriod(caps.wPeriodMin) != 0)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("StopWatch: TimeBeginPeriod failed");
            }
        }

        public static void EndOptimizedMode()
        {
            if (TimeEndPeriod(caps.wPeriodMin) != 0)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("StopWatch: TimeEndPeriod failed");
            }
        }
        #endif

        static Random random;

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            #if WIN32
            OptimizedMode();
            #endif

            random = new Random();
            Console.WriteLine("Enter loop count:");
            Console.WriteLine("999999");
            string value = Console.ReadLine();
            int count;
            if (int.TryParse(value, out count))
            {
                runVector4Test(count);
            }
            else
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Invalide value: " + value);
            }

            #if WIN32
            EndOptimizedMode();
            #endif

            Console.WriteLine("DONE");
            Console.ReadLine();
        }

        static void runVector4Test(int count)
        {
            var values = new Vector4[count];
            const double range = .01;
            for (int i = 0; i != count; ++i)
            {
                values[i].X = (numf)(random.NextDouble() * range) + 1;
                values[i].Y = (numf)(random.NextDouble() * range) + 1;
                values[i].Z = (numf)(random.NextDouble() * range) + 1;
                values[i].W = (numf)(random.NextDouble() * range) + 1;
            }

            Console.WriteLine("Waiting for GC...");
            GC.Collect();
            System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(5000);
            Console.WriteLine("Starting Vector4 Test...");

            var time = new Stopwatch();
            long totalTime = 0;
            Vector4 totalValue = new Vector4();
            for (int i = 0; i != 100; ++i)
            {
                time.Restart();
                for (int i2 = 0; i2 < count-1; ++i2)
                {
                    Vector4 vec1 = values[i2];
                    Vector4 vec2 = values[i2+1];
                    totalValue += vec1;
                    totalValue -= vec2;
                    totalValue /= vec1;
                    totalValue *= vec2;
                }
                time.Stop();
                totalTime += time.ElapsedMilliseconds;
            }

            Console.WriteLine("Vector4 Time: " + (totalTime / 100d));
            Console.WriteLine("Vector4 Values: " + totalValue);
            Console.WriteLine();
        }
    }
}

Here are the results:

<<< AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 4600+ 2.40GHz >>>
{
.NET 4.5 (Win8-Win32) = 39.9 mil

Mono 3.2.3 (Win8-Win32) = 99.49 mil
Mono 3.2.3 (PC-Linux) = 146.87 mil
Mono 3.2.1 (PC-BSD) = 144 mil
}


<<< Intel Core2 Duo P8600 2.40GHz >>>
{
Mono 3.2.3 (OSX 10.9) = 98.54 mil
.NET 4.5 (Win7-Win32) = 38.47 mil
}

Why is Mono on Linux and BSD running about 1/3 slower then the Mono on Windows and OSX??

share|improve this question
1  
According to your numbers, OSX is 2 times slower than windows. You need to consider the fact that linux and Freebsd are running on a different machine than OSX. You can see the difference in Win7 vs Win8 numbers. However i get your point, your numbers state that mono is way faster under Windows. Did you considered the difference in the sourcecode depending on the OS? I mean, your target code is different for 32 bits machines (win 7 & win 8) than it is for linux, freebsd and OSX wich I guess are 64 bits. –  Juan Carlos Brown Oct 31 '13 at 20:53
1  
Maybe post this to one of the Mono mailing lists: mono-project.com/Mailing_Lists –  friism Oct 31 '13 at 20:59
    
@Juan Carlos Brown oops ya that was .NET 4.5. I forgot to get the Win7 Mono test on that Intel CPU. The same source code was used on all CPUs and platforms. –  zezba9000 Oct 31 '13 at 21:06
    
@Juan Carlos Brown The test were all run under 32bit x86. There is nothing different about the Windows tests... so i'm not sure how you can say that? –  zezba9000 Oct 31 '13 at 21:21
    
@zezba9000 I get it, so if all the OS targeted 32bit then the only thing I see that can impact mono on posix OSs is "winmm.dll". My short research indicates that winmm.dll belongs to windows only and will most likely throw an exception under linux and OSX ( link and link ). Besides this, I don't find any other reason for such a big difference in benchmark times. –  Juan Carlos Brown Oct 31 '13 at 22:16

2 Answers 2

enter image description here

Ok I did a way better benchmark (RayTraceBenchmark): https://github.com/zezba9000/RayTraceBenchmark (Feel free to do pull-requests to add more langs or post up ports [would like to see the results])

It renders a 3D scene and saves a RAW image file. You can open the image via Photoshop or whatever. The resolution of the image is 1280x720.

Here are the current resolts from the test: https://github.com/zezba9000/RayTraceBenchmark/blob/master/C%23/Results.md

As you can see Linux/BSD still run slower on the same computer? This should not happen?

<<< AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 4600+ 2.40GHz >>>
.NET 4.5 (Win8-Win32)
(x86) = 1.179 sec
(x64) = 1.549 sec

Mono 3.2.3 (Win8-Win32)
(x86) = 2.059 sec
(x64) = 2.07 sec

Mono 3.2.3 (PC-Linux)
(x86) = 2.425
(x64) = 2.409

Mono 3.2.1 (PC-BSD)
(x86) = 2.536
(x64) = 2.509

<<< Intel Core2 Duo P8600 2.40GHz >>>
.NET 4.5 (Win7-Win32)
(x86) = 1.05 sec
(x64) = 1.132 sec

Mono 3.2.3 (Win7-Win32) 
(x86) = 1.692 sec
(x64) = 1.702 sec

Mono 3.2.3 (OSX 10.9)
(x86) = 1.675 sec
(x64) = 1.679 sec
share|improve this answer
    
There is still no good answer as to why the Mono runs are so much slower. Were you ever able to find a reasonable answer? –  Anthony Gatlin May 8 at 17:35
1  
No concrete answer, but after many tests the reason would most likely be the Mono CLR or JIT is much slower. But exactly which one or why I don't know. –  zezba9000 May 8 at 22:55
    
zezba9000, most references (via Google) seem to indicate that Mono, is, on average, about half as fast as .NET. I know that Microsoft expends a significant amount of effort on optimizing both the Framework and the C# compiler. Some (wild arse) guesses I might make would be that 1) the C# compiler in the .NET framework may be better at or more aggressive in in-lining code; 2) key routines in the framework may be better tuned to Windows; and (as you mentioned) 3) the Mono JIT may not be quite as efficient as the one in .NET. Pure speculation, though. Thanks for your answer. –  Anthony Gatlin May 9 at 2:12

Last I checked, Mono's compiler technology was based on iburg, which was hot stuff in 1983 (and which is what I learned in school - around 1984 - due to Davidson&Fraser&Hansen), but which is based on fixed (generally optimistic) load latency and non-pipelined instruction scheduling. Since then we've had new algorithms for both (eg: http://pages.cs.wisc.edu/~fischer/cs701.f08/eggers.pdf - a paper on load latencies, circa 1992, plus, eg, the resource-based CPU scheduling now used for multiple issue scheduling in both clang and gcc, which, IIRC, good papers were starting to appear circa 2000). So that might explain maybe 5-30% perf right there.

Also, there's GC performance: mono's way behind in this area, whereas microsoft is competing with the JVM guys (IBM, Sun), who are very good at it. My sense is that although the mono project is a great piece of work, it has its work cut out for it just keeping up with all the new stuff Microsoft keeps piling in (leaving little time for compiler, GC perf, VM,... improvements). Remember that MS writes the majority of its new code in .Net, and has a strong interest in making it fast (and they always had decent compilers).

So there's plenty of reasons why perf might be different. Then again, it's open source, and if people care enough they can contribute.

share|improve this answer
    
Problem is I care, but its not my field and where I can focus my time right now. Although I may end up making a subset of C# compile to Nimrod or C++ and it turn get performance from that. –  zezba9000 May 26 at 21:33

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