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I've a .DLL which creates "named" a shared memory using some utility functions inside it

I need to write/read following C struct via python using functions having following prototype:

  • int write_shmem(const char* shmem_name, char* shmem)
  • int read_shmem ( const char* shmem_name , char* shmem);

in the .DLL file

  • shmem_name is shared memory name
  • shmem is the data to be written

The C struct is similar to

typedef struct {
   unsigned char c;
   unsigned long l;
   float f;
   double d;
 } DataBlock ;

I'm using following in python code

from ctypes import *
dll = cdll.LoadLibrary('shared_mem.dll')
write_shmem = dll.write_shmem
write_shmem.restype = ctypes.c_int

read_shmem = dll.read_shmem
read_shmem.restype = ctypes.c_int

class DataBlock(Structure):
    _fields_ = [('c', c_ubyte), ('l', c_ulong),
                ('f',c_float), ('d', c_double) ]

data = DataBlock('A',123, 12.32, 1.89721)

write_shmem(c_char_p(b'P0W') , ??? ) #  cast(data, POINTER(c_char) ?

#...

read_shmem(c_char_p(b'P0W'),  ??? )  #  cast(data, POINTER(c_char) ?

How to typecast to char* ?

Will using casting correctly puts the data to shared memory ? I need to read the same shared memory from a C application

Edit

Using:

int create_shmem(const char*, long long ); from .DLL I'm creating a "named" shared memory

Python code :

create_shmem( c_char_p(b'P0W'),
               ctypes.c_longlong(sizeof(DataBlock)) )

write_shmem and read_shmem will simply write/read data by using the size of created memory. This is done in .DLL functions itself. (Boost Interprocess Shared Memory Object is used here)

Using Python Version : 3.3.0

share|improve this question
    
How does write_shmem know the size of data to write? Similarly, how does read_shmem know how much data to read? Are you implicitly using sizeof(DataBlock) in their implementation? –  crayzeewulf Oct 31 '13 at 19:47
    
@crayzeewulf yes, using int create_shmem(const char*, long long ); from the dll I'm creating shared memory of known size –  P0W Oct 31 '13 at 19:51
    
Try: write_shmem("blah", byref(data)). Same for read_shmem. –  crayzeewulf Oct 31 '13 at 20:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I do not have your versions of read_shmem and write_shmem functions. So I created the following dummy versions:

#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct {
    unsigned char c;
    unsigned long l;
    float f;
    double d;
} DataBlock ;

int write_shmem(const char* shmem_name, char* data)
{
    DataBlock* block = (DataBlock*)data ;
    printf("%c %ld %f %lf\n", block->c, block->l, block->f, block->d) ;
    return sizeof(DataBlock) ;
}

int read_shmem(const char* shmem_name, char* data) 
{
    DataBlock* block = (DataBlock*)data ;
    block->c = 'z' ;
    block->l = 3 ;
    block->f = block->d = 3.14 ;
    return sizeof(DataBlock) ;
}

In the Python code, I can call them this way:

#! /usr/bin/env python3
from ctypes import *
dll = cdll.LoadLibrary('./libshmem.so')

write_shmem = dll.write_shmem
write_shmem.restype = c_int

read_shmem = dll.read_shmem
read_shmem.restype = c_int

class DataBlock(Structure):
    _fields_ = [('c', c_ubyte), ('l', c_ulong),
                ('f',c_float), ('d', c_double) ]

#
# Using byref()
#
data = DataBlock(ord('A'), 123, 12.32, 1.89721)

write_shmem(b"P0W", byref(data))
read_shmem(b"P0W", byref(data))

print("{0} {1} {2} {3}".format(chr(data.c), data.l, data.f, data.d))

#
# Using pointer()
#
data = DataBlock(ord('A'), 123, 12.32, 1.89721)

write_shmem(b"P0W", pointer(data))
read_shmem(b"P0W", pointer(data))

print("{0} {1} {2} {3}".format(chr(data.c), data.l, data.f, data.d))

#
# Using cast()
#
data = DataBlock(ord('A'), 123, 12.32, 1.89721)

write_shmem(b"P0W", cast(pointer(data), c_char_p))
read_shmem(b"P0W", cast(pointer(data), c_char_p))

print("{0} {1} {2} {3}".format(chr(data.c), data.l, data.f, data.d))

The output in each case (byref, pointer, or cast usage) is:

A 123 12.320000 1.897210
z 3 3.140000104904175 3.14

I am using Linux so I am creating a shared object library from the C code using the following Makefile:

libshmem.so: dummy_shmem.o
    gcc -shared -o libshmem.so dummy_shmem.o

dummy_shmem.o: dummy_shmem.c
    gcc -fpic -c dummy_shmem.c

But the behavior should be about the same on Windows.

Unsolicited Suggestion

Note that using write_shmem and read_shmem with implicit knowledge of the size of the data buffer passed to them is dangerous. You will get strange results if you accidentally pass another type of object to them. A safer option might be to create shims around these functions to explicitly manage DataBlock instances. Here is an example where I have dummy implementations of create_shmem, write_shmem, and read_shmem:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <malloc.h>
#include <string.h>

typedef struct {
    unsigned char c;
    unsigned long l;
    float f;
    double d;
} DataBlock ;

static char* dummy_shmem = 0 ;
static size_t shmem_size = 0 ;

int create_shmem(const char* shmem_name, const size_t data_size)
{
    free(dummy_shmem) ;
    dummy_shmem = 0 ;
    shmem_size = 0 ;

    dummy_shmem = malloc(data_size) ;
    shmem_size = dummy_shmem ? data_size : 0 ;

    return shmem_size ;
}

int write_shmem(const char* shmem_name, const char* data, const size_t data_size)
{
    if (data_size <= shmem_size) {
        memcpy(dummy_shmem, data, data_size) ;
        return data_size ;
    }
    return 0 ;
}

int read_shmem(const char* shmem_name, char* data, const size_t data_size) 
{
    if (data_size <= shmem_size) {
        memcpy(data, dummy_shmem, data_size) ;
        return data_size ;
    }
    return 0 ;
}

int create_block(const char* shmem_name)
{
    printf("create_block: %s\n", shmem_name) ;
    return create_shmem(shmem_name, sizeof(DataBlock)) ;
}

int write_block(const char* shmem_name, const DataBlock* data)
{
    printf("write_block: [%s] %c %ld %f %lf\n", shmem_name, data->c, data->l, data->f, data->d) ;
    return write_shmem(shmem_name, (char*)data, sizeof(DataBlock)) ;
}

DataBlock read_block(const char* shmem_name)
{
    DataBlock result ;
    read_shmem(shmem_name, (char*)&result, sizeof(DataBlock)) ;
    printf("read_block: [%s] %c %ld %f %lf\n", shmem_name, result.c, result.l, result.f, result.d) ;
    return result ;
}

Then the Python code becomes a lot simpler, cleaner, and safer:

#! /usr/bin/env python3
from ctypes import *
dll = cdll.LoadLibrary('./libshmem.so')

class DataBlock(Structure):
    _fields_ = [('c', c_ubyte), ('l', c_ulong),
                ('f',c_float), ('d', c_double) ]

create_block = dll.create_block
create_block.argtypes = [c_char_p]
create_block.restype = c_int

write_block = dll.write_block
write_block.argtypes = [c_char_p, POINTER(DataBlock)]
write_block.restype = c_int

read_block = dll.read_block
read_block.argtypes = [c_char_p]
read_block.restype = DataBlock
#
# Create memory block 
#
create_block(b"P0W")    
#
# Write data block to shmem
#
in_data = DataBlock(ord('A'), 123, 12.32, 1.89721)
write_block(b"P0W", in_data)
#
# Read data block from shmem. 
#
out_data = read_block(b"P0W")

print("{0} {1} {2} {3}".format(chr(in_data.c), in_data.l, in_data.f, in_data.d))
print("{0} {1} {2} {3}".format(chr(out_data.c), out_data.l, out_data.f, out_data.d))

Updates:

  • Passing DataBlock by reference to write_block (see eryksun's comments below).
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, what difference will it make with cast ? –  P0W Oct 31 '13 at 20:29
    
Update: You can use cast and pointer too. But using cast results in less readable code. Using pointer is slower than using byref according to the documentation. I have updated the above sample code with some examples. –  crayzeewulf Oct 31 '13 at 20:42
    
@P0W, I had left out the 'b' in front of the shmem names in the code. I have corrected it so that the name gets passed as a byte literal. –  crayzeewulf Oct 31 '13 at 21:42
    
@eryksun Thanks and good points. There is a lot of room for improvement here (both in style and efficiency). I wanted to have a gradual transition from P0W's original code to a more complex code. I was even tempted to do the whole thing in C++ but thought that would be too different from P0W's original code. In any case, your points are all valid. I have updated the second code to pass const DataBlock* to write_block. –  crayzeewulf Nov 1 '13 at 20:45
    
The same applies to read_block. For a C caller the compiler reserves space on the stack and calls read_block with an implicit pointer. When read_block returns, the result is copied from the local variable to the implicit address. I need to check this, but I think with ctypes there may be yet another copy from the buffer set up by libffi. anyway, it's more efficient to have the caller allocate the DataBlock as an out parameter passed by reference. –  eryksun Nov 2 '13 at 8:02

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