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I have an object constructor, and I defined a method to setting new values to the object properties using a json-object as input parameter, my solution is working, but I have a doubt on is there a best way to do it?

Any answer using OOP will be appreciated.


Here is my code:

//Object constructor
function searchOption(o) {
   o = o || {};
   this.Word = o.Word || "";
   this.SubCategories = o.SubCategories || [];
   this.Page = o.Page || 1;
   this.Sort = o.Sort || "desc";
   this.ItemsView = o.ItemsView || 18;
   //Method to set new values, preserving the untouched properties
   this.set = function (x) { searchOption($.extend(this, x)); };
}

(function() {
    var search = new searchOption({ Word:"canela", ItemsView:6 });
    console.log(search);
    search.set({ Word:"VIAJE", Page:3, Sort:"asc" });
    console.log(search);
})();
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closed as unclear what you're asking by meagar, Quentin, Qantas 94 Heavy, EdChum, Steve Czetty Mar 3 at 21:07

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
You shouldn't be using this.set = function (x) { searchOption($.extend(this, x)); };; rather, add set to searchOption's prototype. –  meagar Oct 31 '13 at 19:39
2  
This question appears to be off-topic because it is asking for a code review –  Quentin Oct 31 '13 at 19:45
    
Thanks @meagar, but why the prototype will be a better approach instead of defining the method inside the constructor? –  jherax Oct 31 '13 at 19:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since $.extend() extends the first passed object you even do not need to call constructor function once again in your set method

searchOption.prototype.set = function(x) {
    $.extend(this, x);
};

Fiddle here: http://jsbin.com/eHodoqA/1/edit

NOTE:

If you want SubCategories to be merged as well - pass true as first parameter to $.extend that will trigger deep clone (see http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.extend/#jQuery-extend-deep-target-object1-objectN)

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See my answer for more substantive improvements, if you are interested. –  plalx Oct 31 '13 at 21:00

I would remove this.set method from the constructor and use prototype instead.

//Object constructor
function searchOption(o) {
   o = o || {};
   this.Word = o.Word || "";
   this.SubCategories = o.SubCategories || [];
   this.Page = o.Page || 1;
   this.Sort = o.Sort || "desc";
   this.ItemsView = o.ItemsView || 18;
}

//Method to set new values, preserving the untouched properties
searchOption.prototype.set = function(x) {
    searchOption($.extend(this, x));
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Guilherme Sehn, why the prototype will be a better approach instead of defining the method inside the constructor? –  jherax Oct 31 '13 at 19:50
2  
@jherax.corp If you define function inside constructor, you will have new instance of function for each instance of object created using this constructor. In case you use prototype function will be shared for all objects created using constructor –  Vadim Oct 31 '13 at 20:02
    
Thanks @Vadim, having shared methods is a best way to do it :) –  jherax Oct 31 '13 at 20:07
    
See my answer for more substantive improvements, if you are interested. –  plalx Oct 31 '13 at 21:00

There's a better way in terms of memory consumption since you could share your default values between instances through the prototype. The same also apply to functions.

You could implement this new design by using a helper function that copies over the desired members only if they aren't undefined or differ from the default values.

Also, as a convention constructor functions starts with an uppercase letter and properties are usually lowerCamelCased. These naming conventions are widely used and I strongly advise you to follow them.

The design that follows is shown for learning purposes and is not necessary unless you plan to have a lot of SearchOption instances.

function applyConfig(obj, config, props) {
    var i = 0,
        len = props.length,
        k, v;

    for (; i < len; i++) {
        if (
            config.hasOwnProperty(k = props[i]) && typeof (v = config[k]) !== 'undefined' //ingore undefined values
            //let default values be shared between instances
            && v !== obj[k]
        ) {
            obj[k] = v;
        }
    }
}

function SearchOption(config) {

    config = config || {};

    //handle all immutable values
    applyConfig(this, config, ['word', 'page', 'sort', 'itemsView']);

    this.subCategories = config.subCategories || [];
}


SearchOption.prototype = {
    constructor: SearchOption,
    //keeping default values on the prototype is memory efficient
    //since they get shared between instances, however we should only use
    //this approach for immutable values.
    word: '',
    page: 1,
    sort: 'desc',
    itemsView: 18,
    //it's better to have functions on the prototype too
    set: function (values) {
        //not sure why you were doing searchOptions(...)? It looks very wrong
        //since the function will get executed in the global object's context (window)

        //note that with the following, we will shadow any default prototype
        //values, unlike when we called the constructor.
        $.extend(this, values);
    }
};

var so1 = new SearchOption(), //share same word
    so2 = new SearchOption(), //share same word
    so3 = new SearchOption({
        word: 'test'
    });

console.log('so1:', so1.word, 'so2:', so2.word, 'so3:', so3.word);

console.log(so1);
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