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In c++ its something like this:

struct node{
   int value;
   node *left;
   node *right;
};

and in function, when i need it, il use it like this:

node *r;
r = new node();
r -> inf = 1;
r -> left = r -> right = null;

but how is this working in C ? i tryed:

struct node{
    int value;
    node *left;
    node *right;
};

but i got error: indentifier node is undefined, so i changed in:

struct node{
    int value;
    struct node *left;
    struct node *right;
};

but now, if i try to make a new variable:

node *r;

i get error: identifier node is undefiner at *r declaration line, What am I doing wrong?

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possible duplicate of typedef struct vs struct definitions –  ugoren Oct 31 '13 at 20:30
    
Doing wrong? Learning C++ before C, maybe? Have fun malloc-ing the new nodes, will be waiting for that one :) ... just to prevent another duplicate stackoverflow.com/a/4085018/1162141 –  technosaurus Oct 31 '13 at 21:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Anytime you refer to your struct you must refer to it as:

struct node * r;

So your struct definition should look like this:

struct node {
    int value;
    struct node * left;
    struct node * right;
}

Also, the new keyword is not in ANSI C. Since you are working with a pointer, you need to allocate the memory using malloc(). So

struct node * r = malloc(sizeof(struct node));
r->value = 0;
r->left = NULL;
r->right = NULL;

would allocate memory and initialize the records inside.

If you do not want to refer to it as struct node as the type, you can use a typedef:

typedef struct node {
    int value;
    struct node * left;
    struct node * right;
} node;

Though you still need to refer the pointers inside the record as struct node since it is declared within the typedef. Now you can reference as:

node * r = malloc(sizeof(node));
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@simonc You do not de-reference a struct, only variables. sizeof(node) is the number of bytes of the record. sizeof(node*) is the number of bytes for the pointer. But sizeof(*node) is a compilation error. –  ShooShoSha Oct 31 '13 at 21:07
    
Sorry, you're quite right, I completely mis-read the code –  simonc Oct 31 '13 at 22:22

In C (as opposed to C++) you still need to use the struct keyword everywhere (or use a typedef). Try this:

struct node *r;

or this:

typedef struct node {
    int value;
    struct node *left;
    struct node *right;
} node;

As mentioned in a comment, the node references from inside the struct still need the struct keyword, since the typedef does not yet exist. But now you can use node without the struct keyword.

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+1. Would also be worth mentioning that new node() isn't valid C. –  simonc Oct 31 '13 at 20:30
2  
I think you still need to explicitly specify struct node inside the structure declaration for the children pointers. –  Rerito Oct 31 '13 at 20:30
    
You're right, you do still need the struct keyword there. I will edit my answer. –  Zach Oct 31 '13 at 21:53

As I stated in my comment, you cannot use a typedef within the structure being typedefed like suggested by Zach. You need to explicitly name the structure in use :

struct node {
    int value;
    struct node *left;
    struct node *right;
}

Moreover, I would recommend not to use a typedef unless you need to opacify a data type. Typedefing things just for the sake of writing less characters is not a good practice.

Still, if you are really really lazy, the typedef has to be done before the struct declaration, as in the example below :

/* Note that you can't use the same name for the struct and the typedef */
typedef struct node Node;
struct node {
    int value;
    Node *left;
    Node *right;
};

Then, if you are trying to implement binary trees, you are likely to implement the related methods. You will surely need a reference to the parent of a node to make insertion and deletion easier. Keep it in mind !

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