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I'm struggeling a bit with a part of code for a little program I'm writing. Have in mind I'm very new with this.

Heres the code:

def sell():
    sell = input("\nGreetings! What would you like to do today?\nPress 1 to sell an animal\nPress 2 to buy an animal\nPress 3 If you want to see all the farms and their animals first\n")

    if sell == "1":
        whichs = input("Which animal do you want to sell?\nPress 1 for pig\nPress 2 for horse\nPress 3 for cow\nPress 4 for bull\n")
        if whichs == "1":
            print ("\nYou just sold\n",p[0])
            print ("\nYou now have 350gold")
            print ("\nThese are the animals you have left:")
            print (p[1], p[2], p[3]) #Prints the animals you have left from p list.
        elif whichs == "2":
            print ("\nYou just sold\n",p[1])
            print ("\nYou now have 350gold")
            print ("\nThese are the animals you have left:")
            print (p[0], p[2], p[3])
        elif whichs == "3":
            print ("\nYou just sold\n",p[2])
            print ("\nYou now have 360gold.")
            print ("\nThese are the animals you have left:")
            print (p[0], p[1], p[3])
        elif whichs == "4":
            print ("\nYou just sold\n",p[3])
            print ("\nYou now have 350gold.")
            print ("\nThese are the animals you have left:")
            print (p[0], p[1], p[2])
        else:
            print ("Error")

I want this to loop so when the user has sold one animal, they start over with the:

sell = input("\nGreetings! What would you like to do today?\nPress 1 to sell an animal\nPress 2 to buy an animal\nPress 3 If you want to see all the farms and their animals first\n")

And I'm struggeling with how this is done.

share|improve this question
2  
have you tried a while statement? –  A.E. Drew Oct 31 '13 at 22:48
1  
Here's the reference. And here's a tutorial. –  Henry Keiter Oct 31 '13 at 23:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The other two answers are right in telling you to use a while loop but fail to address a more general problem: the loop shouldn't be inside of the sell function but outside of it, as your text indicates that the user can also buy stuff or look at his stats. You should create individual functions for all of these actions and then create a loop that checks for the action and calls the appropriate functions:

def buy():
    #...

def sell():
    #...

def stats():
    #...

while True:
    choice = input("1: Buy 2:Sell 3:Stats - press any other key to exit")
    if choice == "1": buy()
    elif choice == "2": sell()
    elif choice == "3": stats()
    else: break

The loop could be optimized by using more pythonic approaches like mapping the choices to the functions in a dictionary, but I've written it with a simple if for clarity.

Also, if you don't choose to hold all your state in global variables (which you shouldn't), it would make sense to put the functions into a class which also holds the current balance, stock and other game parameters.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much, I had been thinking about if it was optimal to have all that code in one function. Now my code looks much cleaner and everything works great! I'm not quite sure what you mean with mapping the choices. I use classes for all the farms and types of animals if that's what you mean. –  Bondenn Nov 1 '13 at 23:36
def sell():
    looping = True

    while looping:
        sell = input("\nGreetings! ... Press Q for quit")

        if sell == "1":
            #rest of your code
        elif sell == "Q":
            looping = False
share|improve this answer

Try using a while loop:

def sell_function():
    while True:
        sell = input("\nGreetings! What would you like to do today?\nPress 1 to sell an animal\nPress 2 to buy an animal\nPress 3 If you want to see all the farms and their animals first\n")
        # ...
            else:
                print("Error")
                break        # Stop looping on error

We could have also set a variable to True, done while variable and then variable = False instead of break for the same effect (in this instance).

I renamed your function, as you used a variable called sell and had a function with the same name which could cause problems. Also, you'll no doubt later find the break and continue statements useful.

share|improve this answer
    
Might be a good idea to add a break somewhere to get out. –  uselpa Oct 31 '13 at 22:51
    
Where should the break be to get the loop working and to get out at the right place? I've tried putting the break just after the else-statement, but it didn't work. –  Bondenn Oct 31 '13 at 22:55
    
@user2877270 See my answer, it should be directly below (and at the same indentation level) as the print("Error") part, if you want to break on error. –  sweeneyrod Oct 31 '13 at 22:56
    
Yeah I noticed that, I had to get the right indention level for my whole code, that's why it wasn't working. Now it's working really smooth, thank you so much for the help! And btw, how do i accept answer? I'm new here aswell :) –  Bondenn Oct 31 '13 at 23:03
    
@user2877270 Click the tick beneath the number of votes the answer has. –  sweeneyrod Oct 31 '13 at 23:03

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