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Sorry guys, I had no idea how to phrase this one, but I have the following in a where clause:

person_id not in (
    SELECT distinct person_id
    FROM protocol_application_log_devl pal
    WHERE pal.set_id = @set_id
)

When the subquery returns no results, my whole select fails to return anything. To work around this, I replaced person_id in the subquery with isnull(person_id, '00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000').

It seems to work, but is there a better way to solve this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It is better to use NOT EXISTS anyway:

WHERE NOT EXISTS(
    SELECT 1 FROM protocol_application_log_devl pal
    WHERE pal.person_id = person_id
     AND  pal.set_id = @set_id
)

Should I use NOT IN, OUTER APPLY, LEFT OUTER JOIN, EXCEPT, or NOT EXISTS?

A pattern I see quite a bit, and wish that I didn't, is NOT IN. When I see this pattern, I cringe. But not for performance reasons – after all, it creates a decent enough plan in this case:

The main problem is that the results can be surprising if the target column is NULLable (SQL Server processes this as a left anti semi join, but can't reliably tell you if a NULL on the right side is equal to – or not equal to – the reference on the left side). Also, optimization can behave differently if the column is NULLable, even if it doesn't actually contain any NULL values

Instead of NOT IN, use a correlated NOT EXISTS for this query pattern. Always. Other methods may rival it in terms of performance, when all other variables are the same, but all of the other methods introduce either performance problems or other challenges.

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Wow, I would have guessed that the NOT EXISTS would have a much higher cost, mainly because I'd think that subquery would need to be invoked for each person (tens of thousands in my case). But the article said that the query benefits from c.CustomerID being an index, but it isn't an index in my case. The same value for person_id can be in that table many times. –  jreed121 Nov 1 '13 at 17:08
    
@jreed121: An index doesn't need to be unique to benefit from it. But even without an index NOT EXISTS is the best option(as demonstrated in the article). –  Tim Schmelter Nov 1 '13 at 19:25
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While I support Tim's answer as being correct-in-practice (NOT IN is not appropriate here), this is an interesting case noted in the IN / NOT IN documentation:

Caution: Any null values returned by subquery or expression that are compared to test_expression using IN or NOT IN return UNKNOWN. Using null values in together with IN or NOT IN can produce unexpected results1.

This is why the isnull "fixes" the problem - it masks any such NULL values and avoids the unexpected behavior. With that in mind, the following approach would also work (but please heed the advice about not using NOT IN to begin with):

person_id not in (
  SELECT distinct person_id
  FROM protocol_application_log_devl pal
  WHERE pal.set_id = @set_id
    AND person_id NOT NULL    -- guard here
)

However, a NULL person_id is suspicious and might indicate other issues ..

1 Here is the Proof pudding:

select case when 1 not in (2)       then 1 else 0 end as r1,
       case when 1 not in (2, NULL) then 1 else 0 end as r2
-- r1: 1, r2: 0
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But a NULL person_id just means that the person doesn't have that particular set_id in the protocol_application_log_devl table. In that case, I'd want to include the person in my parent SELECT's results. At this point, I'm realizing that my biggest cost driver is the fact that this log table doesn't have an index, but I don't know how to apply one given that it is likely that a person has had the same set_id applied multiple times. –  jreed121 Nov 1 '13 at 17:13
    
@jreed121 Take time to reinvest into the schema as required/beneficial. Look at the query plans to determine if there are any severely lacking indexes or ill-planned parts of a query. I generally try to write all my queries in terms of JOINs - if I can't do so simply without the use of distinct then something is possibly amiss. –  user2864740 Nov 1 '13 at 18:04
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