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The proplem is fairly simple:
I want to start another class in a destructor.

The A class should only be released when the other class is destructed.

struct A
{
void foo();
};


struct B
{
  B();
  ~B();
};

B::~B()
  { 
     //Something like A a();
  };

a.foo();

Is there a simple answer I can't see? Or could this get handled with Threading?

Thanks in advance
Xeno Ceph

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Bartek Banachewicz, aaronman, Kerrek SB, Zac Howland, bensiu Nov 1 '13 at 13:11

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
you can use global variables, or a class attribute (a static attribute) to store the instance of the class B in the class A (or the opposite). And you wrote struct, but it's class –  Pierre Emmanuel Lallemant Oct 31 '13 at 23:35
    
@PierreEmmanuelLallemant why is it a class? If he wrote struct, it's a struct. –  Bartek Banachewicz Oct 31 '13 at 23:37
    
@Pierre You're right, I could use a Handler class, but I try to avoid that. Oops, sorry for that struct/class thing –  Xeno Ceph Oct 31 '13 at 23:39
    
You seem to be using "class", "start" and "released" in a non-standard manner, and performing the operation a.foo() outside of any function. Other than that, your question is perfectly clear. –  Beta Oct 31 '13 at 23:39
    
@PierreEmmanuelLallemant - class and struct are near synonyms in C++. The only difference between class and struct is that the default visibility in a class is private whereas it's public in a struct. –  David Hammen Oct 31 '13 at 23:42
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here is something that's not exactly the same code but very similar.

working example

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>

class A
{
    public:
        void foo();
};

void A::foo()
{
    std::cout << "a.foo()" << std::endl;
}

A *a = nullptr;


class B
{
    public:
        ~B();
};

B::~B()
{ 
    a = new A();
}


int main()
{
    B *b = new B();
    delete b;
    a->foo();
}
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1  
Why would you include <vector> remains a mystery to me. Also, just a tip, prefer nullptr to 0 in such contexts. –  Bartek Banachewicz Oct 31 '13 at 23:44
    
thats just Coliru default includes, forgot to remove them –  Andrew Douglas Oct 31 '13 at 23:45
    
Since the OP is using C++11, maybe initialize A *a = nullptr; is a better idea. –  texasbruce Oct 31 '13 at 23:46
1  
I don't like the concept of creating something in a destructor. I am sure there is a rule against doing this, but I can't name it. Fowler readings escapes me, but it's something about expecting certain things from a function. When a destructor is called I wouldn't expect something else to be created as a side effect. –  Andrew Douglas Oct 31 '13 at 23:55
    
It seems that I have to work with global pointers. Thanks to Bartek and you. –  Xeno Ceph Oct 31 '13 at 23:58
show 1 more comment
struct A {
    void foo();
};

struct B {
    ~B() {
      A a;
    }
};

There you go, an instance of A will be created in B's destructor. It will also be immediately destroyed when the scope of said destructor closes. You didn't say anything about later access to it, mind you.

The real problem is that destructors don't take and return anything, so there's simply no sane way of constructing anything sanely with those cruel little beings.

Another problem that might happen when creating instances in constructors are exceptions. Basically, not getting into detail, if something throws in a destructor and you can't handle it immediately, you have a huge problem. Throwing when constructing is a common practice to signal and error, on the other hand, destructors shouldn't throw at all. That's why you have to be extremely careful even in such a simple case.


Being a bit more serious though, you can initialize a global pointer in it, if it's a just a (stupid, no less) assignment.

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Lol, wtf kinda answer is this, I'm pretty sure some compilers would just entirely optimize out the A a;, unless it had side effects –  aaronman Oct 31 '13 at 23:39
    
@aaronman The one that answers the question, huh? I've added a bit of explanation. –  Bartek Banachewicz Oct 31 '13 at 23:40
2  
I think the answer to this question is Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist –  aaronman Oct 31 '13 at 23:42
    
The main issue with doing this is when A::A() throws an exception that is not caught in B::~B(). The side effects of that would be a pain. –  Zac Howland Oct 31 '13 at 23:51
    
@ZacHowland You're perfectly right, and David just posted an answer that covers that. I'll incorporate a note. –  Bartek Banachewicz Oct 31 '13 at 23:52
add comment
B::~B () {
   A a;
   // Do something with class instance a to aid in the destruction of this.
}

There's a potential problem with the above: What if A a; throws an exception? Throwing an exception in a destructor is usually a bad idea. There's no problem with the above if you know that A a; cannot throw an exception. You should rethink what you are doing if it can throw.

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This is an awfully bad idea. What happens if A throws? It sounds almost like you're trying to execute arbitrary code when something goes out of scope. If that's the case, here's a better alternative, use Boost.ScopeExit:

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/scope_exit.hpp>

int main() {
  int a = 0;
  { // Creating a new scope
    BOOST_SCOPE_EXIT_ALL(&) {
      std::cout << "In exit handler. Setting `a` to 42\n";
      a = 42;
    };
    std::cout << "Value of `a` in scope is: " << a << "\n";
  } // Ending artificial scope

  std::cout << "Value of `a` after scope is: " << a << "\n";
}

And poof:

Value of `a` in scope is: 0
In exit handler. Setting `a` to 42
Value of `a` after scope is: 42

Because of the lack of specificity in your question as to why you would want to do this is, my advice - and the advice of many - is this: make sure destructors are exception safe. Go to great lengths to maintain this property of your code. Use lambdas, other RAII techniques, or ScopeExit, or anything, but things that can throw in a destructor are heavily, heavily discouraged (for example, allocations).

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the library, looks interesting. –  Bartek Banachewicz Nov 1 '13 at 10:59
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