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Consider the data frame below. I want to compare each row with rows below and then take the rows that are equal in more than 3 values.

I wrote the code below, but it is very slow if you have a large data frame.

How could I do that faster?

data <- as.data.frame(matrix(c(10,11,10,13,9,10,11,10,14,9,10,10,8,12,9,10,11,10,13,9,13,13,10,13,9), nrow=5, byrow=T))
rownames(data)<-c("sample_1","sample_2","sample_3","sample_4","sample_5")

>data
          V1 V2 V3 V4 V5
sample_1  10 11 10 13  9
sample_2  10 11 10 14  9
sample_3  10 10  8 12  9
sample_4  10 11 10 13  9
sample_5  13 13 10 13  9

output <- data.frame(sample = NA, duplicate = NA, matches = NA)
dfrow <- 1
for(i in 1:nrow(data)) {
    sample <- data[i, ]
    for(j in (i+1):nrow(data)) if(i+1 <= nrow(data)) {
    matches <- 0
        for(V in 1:ncol(data)) {
            if(data[j,V] == sample[,V]) {       
                matches <- matches + 1
            }
        }
        if(matches > 3) {
            duplicate <- data[j, ]
            pair <- cbind(rownames(sample), rownames(duplicate), matches)
            output[dfrow, ] <- pair
            dfrow <- dfrow + 1
        }
    }
}

>output
   sample    duplicate    matches
1 sample_1   sample_2     4
2 sample_1   sample_4     5
3 sample_2   sample_4     4
share|improve this question
2  
How big is your true dataset exactly? If it isn't very big you could just cross join your whole dataset against itself and compare. Also, using data.table instead of data.frame would help with memory. –  Codoremifa Nov 1 '13 at 4:10
    
250,000 rows by 26 columns –  vitor Nov 1 '13 at 4:15
    
data.table is not not row-wise sensitive. –  user974514 Nov 1 '13 at 4:23
    
So n(n+1)/2 - n = 31249875000 combination, and 26 comparisons each. <whistle>. This might be tricky to do and hold in memory. Is it okay if your output is appended to a file? You will probably need to use something like the ff package to handle datasets that large anyway. –  Codoremifa Nov 1 '13 at 4:27
2  
This is a job for Rcpp. However, you should think carefully why and if you really need this. –  Roland Nov 1 '13 at 8:42

7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Here is an Rcpp solution. However, if the result matrix gets too big (i.e., there are too many hits), this will throw an error. I run the loops twice, first to get the necessary size of the result matrix and then to fill it. There is probably a better possibility. Also, obviously, this will only work with integers. If your matrix is numeric, you'll have to deal with floating point precision.

library(Rcpp)
library(inline)

#C++ code:
body <- '
const IntegerMatrix        M(as<IntegerMatrix>(MM));
const int                  m=M.ncol(), n=M.nrow();
long                        count1;
int                         count2;
count1 = 0;
for (int i=0; i<(n-1); i++)
{
   for (int j=(i+1); j<n; j++)
   {
     count2 = 0;
     for (int k=0; k<m; k++) {
        if (M(i,k)==M(j,k)) count2++;
     }
     if (count2>3) count1++;
   } 
}
IntegerMatrix              R(count1,3);
count1 = 0;
for (int i=0; i<(n-1); i++)
{
   for (int j=(i+1); j<n; j++)
   {
     count2 = 0;
     for (int k=0; k<m; k++) {
        if (M(i,k)==M(j,k)) count2++;
     }
     if (count2>3) {
        count1++;
        R(count1-1,0) = i+1;
        R(count1-1,1) = j+1;
        R(count1-1,2) = count2;
     }
   } 
}
return  wrap(R);
'

fun <- cxxfunction(signature(MM = "matrix"), 
                     body,plugin="Rcpp")

#with your data
fun(as.matrix(data))
#      [,1] [,2] [,3]
# [1,]    1    2    4
# [2,]    1    4    5
# [3,]    2    4    4

#Benchmarks
set.seed(42)
mat1 <- matrix(sample(1:10,250*26,TRUE),ncol=26)
mat2 <- matrix(sample(1:10,2500*26,TRUE),ncol=26)
mat3 <- matrix(sample(1:10,10000*26,TRUE),ncol=26)
mat4 <- matrix(sample(1:10,25000*26,TRUE),ncol=26)
library(microbenchmark)
microbenchmark(
  fun(mat1),
  fun(mat2),
  fun(mat3),
  fun(mat4),
  times=3
  )
# Unit: milliseconds
#      expr          min           lq       median           uq          max neval
# fun(mat1)     2.675568     2.689586     2.703603     2.732487     2.761371     3
# fun(mat2)   272.600480   274.680815   276.761151   276.796217   276.831282     3
# fun(mat3)  4623.875203  4643.634249  4663.393296  4708.067638  4752.741979     3
# fun(mat4) 29041.878164 29047.151348 29052.424532 29235.839275 29419.254017     3
share|improve this answer
    
+1 nice use of rcpp –  Simon O'Hanlon Nov 1 '13 at 16:29
    
Thanks! I don't code in C and this will be a nice opportunity to learn some... Yeah, my real matrix is numeric. The values in the matrix are discrete categories, and I have some categories like 10.1 or 9.3. It's not a matter os precision then, these numbers have to stay as they are. –  vitor Nov 1 '13 at 18:22

EDIT: Not sure what I was thinking last night when I subtracted rows considering I could've directly tested for equality. Removed that uncessary step from the code below.

Here is one approach that may either be slightly clever or poorly thought out... but hopefully the former. The idea is that instead of doing a series of comparisons row-by-row you can instead perform some vectorized operations by subtracting the row from the rest of the data frame and then looking at the number of elements that are equal to zero. Here is a simple implementation of the approach:

> library(data.table)
> data <- as.data.frame(matrix(c(10,11,10,13,9,10,11,10,14,9,10,10,8,12,9,10,11,10,13,9,13,13,10,13,9), nrow=5, byrow=T))
> rownames(data)<-c("sample_1","sample_2","sample_3","sample_4","sample_5")
> 
> findMatch <- function(i,n){
+   tmp <- colSums(t(data[-(1:i),]) == unlist(data[i,]))
+   tmp <- tmp[tmp > n]
+   if(length(tmp) > 0) return(data.table(sample=rownames(data)[i],duplicate=names(tmp),match=tmp))
+   return(NULL)
+ }
> 
> system.time(tab <- rbindlist(lapply(1:(nrow(data)-1),findMatch,n=3)))
   user  system elapsed 
  0.003   0.000   0.003 
> tab
     sample duplicate match
1: sample_1  sample_2     4
2: sample_1  sample_4     5
3: sample_2  sample_4     4

EDIT: Here is version2 that uses matrices and pre-tranposes the data so you only need to do that once. It should scale better to your example with a non-trivial amount of data.

library(data.table)
data <- matrix(round(runif(26*250000,0,25)),ncol=26)
tdata <- t(data)

findMatch <- function(i,n){
    tmp <- colSums(tdata[,-(1:i)] == data[i,])
    j <- which(tmp > n)
    if(length(tmp) > 0) return(data.table(sample=i,duplicate=j+1,match=tmp[j]))
    return(NULL)
}

tab <- rbindlist(lapply(1:(nrow(data)-1),findMatch,n=3))

I ran than on my machine for a bit and got through the first 1500 iterations a full 250,000 x 26 matrix in under 15 minutes and required 600 Mb memory. Since previous iterations do not impact future iterations you could certainly chunk this into parts and run it separately if needed.

share|improve this answer
    
I liked this, but it crashed my 4gb RAM computer after a few hours running with the real dataset, which is 250,000 rows by 26 columns. –  vitor Nov 1 '13 at 14:45
    
That isn't surprising, there are a lot of computations going on here, R is pretty poor with memory and you don't have very much memory to use. Do you know at which iteration things got out of hand? If so you could try chunking it up a bit before that, but you may better using a non-R approach like a database or Rcpp. –  David Nov 1 '13 at 15:11
    
Added a slightly updated version that should work for you, although I think that are better options out there. –  David Nov 1 '13 at 15:32

This is not a complete answer, just a quick workout that comes in mind is to use matrices instead of data.frame (those are quite slow tbh). Matrices are quite fast in R and by completing at least some operations in it and then appending the vector with column names will result in significant speed increase.

Just a quick demo:

data <- matrix(c(10,11,10,13,9,10,11,10,14,9,10,10,8,12,9,10,11,10,13,9,13,13,10,13,9), nrow=5, byrow=T)rownames(data)<-c("sample_1","sample_2","sample_3","sample_4","sample_5")
mu<-c("sample_1","sample_2","sample_3","sample_4","sample_5")

t=proc.time()
tab <- data.frame(sample = NA, duplicate = NA, matches = NA)
dfrow <- 1
for(i in 1:nrow(data)) {
    sample <- data[i, ]
    for(j in (i+1):nrow(data)) if(i+1 <= nrow(data)) {
    matches <- 0
        for(V in 1:ncol(data)) {
            if(data[j,V] == sample[V]) {       
                matches <- matches + 1
            }
        }
        if(matches > 3) {
            duplicate <- data[j, ]
            pair <- cbind(mu[i], mu[j], matches)
            tab[dfrow, ] <- pair
            dfrow <- dfrow + 1
        }
    }
}
proc.time()-t

On the average, on my machine, yields

   user  system elapsed 
   0.00    0.06    0.06 

While in your case I get

 user  system elapsed 
   0.02    0.06    0.08 

I'm not sure whether there's something more quicker than matrices. You can also play around with parallelisation, but for loops C++ code inlining are quite often used (package Rcpp).

share|improve this answer
    
Catch 22 - adding rows to tab might be inefficient over large datasets while pre-allocating a very large dataset to update on each iteration might be inefficient too. Any other ideas? –  Codoremifa Nov 1 '13 at 5:36
library(data.table)

#creating the data
dt <- data.table(read.table(textConnection(
"Sample          V1 V2 V3 V4 V5
sample_1  10 11 10 13  9
sample_2  10 11 10 14  9
sample_3  10 10  8 12  9
sample_4  10 11 10 13  9
sample_5  13 13 10 13  9"), header= TRUE))

# some constants which will be used frequently
nr = nrow(dt)
nc = ncol(dt)-1

#list into which we will insert the no. of matches for each sample 
#for example's sake, i still suggest you write output to a file possibly
totalmatches <- vector(mode = "list", length = (nr-1))

#looping over each sample
for ( i in 1:(nr-1))
{
   # all combinations of i with i+1 to nr
   samplematch <- cbind(dt[i],dt[(i+1):nr])

   # renaming the comparison sample columns
   setnames(samplematch,append(colnames(dt),paste0(colnames(dt),"2")))

   #calculating number of matches
   samplematch[,noofmatches := 0]
   for (j in 1:nc)
   {
      samplematch[,noofmatches := noofmatches+1*(get(paste0("V",j)) == get(paste0("V",j,"2")))]
   }

   # removing individual value columns and matches < 3
   samplematch <- samplematch[noofmatches >= 3,list(Sample,Sample2,noofmatches)]

   # adding to the list
   totalmatches[[i]] <- samplematch
}

The output -

rbindlist(totalmatches)
     Sample  Sample2 noofmatches
1: sample_1 sample_2           4
2: sample_1 sample_4           5
3: sample_1 sample_5           3
4: sample_2 sample_4           4
5: sample_4 sample_5           3

The performance on matrices seems to be better though, this method clocked -

   user  system elapsed 
   0.17    0.01    0.19 
share|improve this answer
    
Is using a data.table actually doing anything here? I'm not sure there are any advantages to using one if you're just going to loop through row by row. –  David Nov 1 '13 at 5:14
    
@David, fair point. I'm playing around, trying to see if setting sample as a key helps in speeding up the loop, whether it would be faster then simply looking for row numbers. Do you know? Also used rbindlist. –  Codoremifa Nov 1 '13 at 5:27
    
However, I do generally use data.tables over data.frames irrespective of the situation. Nothing to lose. –  Codoremifa Nov 1 '13 at 5:29
    
Yeah I don't know the answer to my question, it was curious if there was an advantage, I suppose rbindlist is probably worthwhile just on it's own. –  David Nov 1 '13 at 5:54

Everything that has been said in the comments is very valid; in particular, I also don't necessarily think R is the best place to do this. That said, this works a lot quicker for me than what you've posed on a much larger dataset (~9.7 sec vs. unfinished after two minutes):

data <- matrix(sample(1:30, 10000, replace=TRUE), ncol=5)
#Pre-prepare
x <- 1
#Loop
for(i in seq(nrow(data)-2)){
  #Find the number of matches on that row
  sums <- apply(data[seq(from=-1,to=-i),], 1, function(x) sum(x==data[i,]))
  #Find how many are greater than/equal to 3
  matches <- which(sums >= 3)
  #Prepare output
  output[seq(from=x, length.out=length(matches)),1] <- rep(i, length(matches))
  output[seq(from=x, length.out=length(matches)),2] <- matches
  output[seq(from=x, length.out=length(matches)),3] <- sums[matches]
  #Alter the counter of how many we've made...
  x <- x + length(matches)
}
#Cleanup output
output <- output[!is.na(output[,1]),]})

...I'm fairly certain my weird x variable and the assignment of output could be improved/turned into an apply-type problem, but it's late and I'm tired! Good luck!

share|improve this answer

Well, I took a stab at it, the following code runs about 3 times faster than the original.

f <- function(ind, mydf){
    res <- NULL
    matches <- colSums(t(mydf[-(1:ind),])==mydf[ind,])
    Ndups <- sum(matches > 3)
    if(Ndups > 0){
        res <- data.frame(sample=rep(ind,Ndups),duplicate=which(matches > 3), 
                      matches= matches[matches > 3],stringsAsFactors = F)
        rownames(res) <- NULL
        return(as.matrix(res))
    }
    return(res)
}


f(1,mydf=as.matrix(data))
f(2,mydf=as.matrix(data))
system.time( 
for(i in 1:1000){
    tab <- NULL
    for(j in 1:(dim(data)[1]-1))
        tab <- rbind(tab,f(j,mydf=as.matrix(data)))
}
)/1000
tab 
share|improve this answer

Assuming that all the entries in your dataset are of the same mode (numeric), turn it into a matrix. By transposing, you can take advantage of how == can be vectorized.

data <- as.matrix(data)
data <- t(data)

output <- lapply(seq_len(ncol(data) - 1), function(x) {
    tmp <- data[,x] == data[, (x+1):ncol(data)]
    n_matches <- {
        if (x == ncol(data) - 1) {
            setNames(sum(tmp),colnames(data)[ncol(data)])
        } else {
            colSums(tmp)
        }
    }
    good_matches <- n_matches[n_matches >= 3]
})

The big question is how to output the results. As it stands I have your data in a list. I would think that this is the least memory-intensive way of storing your data.

[[1]]
sample_2 sample_4 sample_5 
       4        5        3 

[[2]]
sample_4 
       4 

[[3]]
named numeric(0)

[[4]]
sample_5 
       3 

If you want a data frame output, then you'll want to tweak the return value of the function within lapply. Perhaps add in the last line of the function:

return(data.frame(
    sample = colnames(data)[x], 
    duplicate = names(good_matches), 
    noofmatches = good_matches,
    stringsAsFactors = FALSE))

And then use:

newoutput <- do.call(rbind, output)
## or, using plyr
# require(plyr)
# newoutput <- rbind.fill(output)
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