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I have the following classes, and I'm trying to access a base member using an object of class H, and I get an H::a is ambiguous warning.

class E
{
public:
    E()
    : a(11)
    {
    }

    void foo()
    {
    }

    int a;
};

class F : public E
{
public:
    F()
    : b(22)
    {
    }

    void foo()
    {
    }

    int b;
};


class G : public E
{
public:
    G()
    : c(33)
    {
    }

    void foo()
    {
    }

    int c;
};


class H: public F, public G
{
public:
    H()
    : d(44)
    {
    }

    void foo()
    {
    }

    int d;
};

I tried making the data member a static, but then it doesn't let me initialize it in the base constructor. What's a solution to these two problems?

share|improve this question
    
Is this C++? You should add the c++ tag if it is. –  kfsone Nov 1 '13 at 4:52
    
Yes, it is thank you. I keep forgetting that. –  GelatinFox Nov 1 '13 at 4:55
2  
It is ambiguous. You have two a's one from the F derivation of E, one from the G derivation of E. Either pick one via full-resolution or use virtual inheritance. –  WhozCraig Nov 1 '13 at 4:56

1 Answer 1

Class "H" has two variables called "a", one derived from F and one from G. You can either use a qualifier,

H::a

or you can use the "virtual" inheritance specifier (see http://stackoverflow.com/a/419999/257645)

#include <iostream>

struct A {
    int a;
};

struct B : virtual public A {
};

struct C : virtual public A {
};

struct D : virtual public B, virtual public C {
    void d1() { a = 1; }
    void d2() { a = 2; }
};

int main() {
    D d;
    d.d1();
    d.d2();
    std::cout << d.a << std::endl;
}

http://ideone.com/p3LPe0

share|improve this answer
    
In the OP's code, they're not functions; they're member a variables. –  WhozCraig Nov 1 '13 at 4:57
    
Yeah, I was going to demonstrate both and got lazy - changed them to variables just to be consistent with his post. –  kfsone Nov 1 '13 at 5:00
    
+1 the premise is right. for an example of how to invoke virtual base class initialization from the point of concentrating the bases, see this link, and note particularly the seemingly missing initializer invocation of the A constructor from the B and C subclasses when constructing D. –  WhozCraig Nov 1 '13 at 5:13

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