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I ran into this today and have no idea why the C# compiler isn't throwing an error.

Int32 x = 1;
if (x == null)
{
    Console.WriteLine("What the?");
}

I'm confused as to how x could ever possibly be null. Especially since this assignment definitely throws a compiler error:

Int32 x = null;

Is it possible that x could become null, did Microsoft just decide to not put this check into the compiler, or was it missed completely?

Update: After messing with the code to write this article, suddenly the compiler came up with a warning that the expression would never be true. Now I'm really lost. I put the object into a class and now the warning has gone away but left with the question, can a value type end up being null.

public class Test
{
    public DateTime ADate = DateTime.Now;

    public Test ()
    {
        Test test = new Test();
        if (test.ADate == null)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("What the?");
        }
    }
}
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6  
You can write if (1 == 2) as well. It's not the compiler's job to perform code path analysis; that's what static analysis tools and unit tests are for. –  Aaronaught Dec 29 '09 at 0:26
    
For why the warning went away, see my answer; and no - it can't be a null. –  Marc Gravell Dec 29 '09 at 0:27
1  
Agreed on the (1 == 2), I was more wondering about the situation (1 == null) –  Joshua Belden Dec 29 '09 at 15:59
    
Thanks everyone that responded. All making sense now. –  Joshua Belden Dec 29 '09 at 16:00
    
Regarding the warning or no warning issue: If the struct in question is a so-called "simple type", like int, the compiler generates nice warnings. For the simple types the == operator is defined by the C# language specification. For other (not simple type) structs, the compiler forgets to emit a warning. See Wrong compiler warning when comparing struct to null for details. For structs that are not simple types, the == operator must be overloaded by an opeartor == method which is a member of the struct (otherwise no == is allowed). –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jan 3 '13 at 13:29

8 Answers 8

up vote 70 down vote accepted

This is legal because operator overload resolution has a unique best operator to choose. There is an == operator that takes two nullable ints. The int local is convertible to a nullable int. The null literal is convertible to a nullable int. Therefore this is a legal usage of the == operator, and will always result in false.

Similarly, we also allow you to say "if (x == 12.6)", which will also always be false. The int local is convertible to a double, the literal is convertible to a double, and obviously they will never be equal.

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3  
Re your comment: connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/… –  Marc Gravell Dec 29 '09 at 0:41
3  
@James: (I retract my earlier erroneous comment, which I have deleted.) User-defined value types which have a user-defined equality operator defined also by default have a lifted user-defined equality operator generated for them. The lifted user-defined equality operator is applicable for the reason you state: all value types are implicitly convertible to their corresponding nullable type, as is the null literal. It is not the case that a user-defined value type that lacks a user-defined comparison operator is comparable to the null literal. –  Eric Lippert Nov 3 '10 at 20:21
1  
Aha, thank you Eric. That explains why if (x == null) is valid with our structs that have operator == and operator != defined on them. It is essentially lifted to if ((X?)x == (X?)null). Can I somehow implement the null-lifted operators on our struct to throw a NotSupportedException to prevent developers from doing this erroneous check in the first place? Our more green developers appear incapable of reasoning about this type of logic, so I'd love to let the compiler teach them a lesson, as it were. :) –  James Dunne Nov 3 '10 at 20:33
3  
@James: Sure, you can implement your own operator == and operator != that take nullable structs. If those exist then the compiler will use them rather than generating them for you automatically. (And incidentally I regret that the warning for the meaningless lifted operator on non-nullable operands does not produce a warning; that's an error in the compiler that we have not gotten around to fixing.) –  Eric Lippert Nov 3 '10 at 21:06
2  
@JamesDunne: What about defining a static bool operator == (SomeID a, String b) and tagging it with Obsolete? If the second operand is an untyped literal null, that would be a better match than any form that required use of lifted operators, but if it's a SomeID? which happens to equal null, the lifted operator would win. –  supercat Jun 10 '13 at 16:15

It isn't an error, as there is a (int?) conversion; it does generate a warning in the example given:

The result of the expression is always 'false' since a value of type 'int' is never equal to 'null' of type 'int?'

If you check the IL, you'll see that it completely removes the unreachable branch - it doesn't exist in a release build.

Note however that it doesn't generate this warning for custom structs with equality operators. It used to in 2.0, but not in the 3.0 compiler. The code is still removed (so it knows that the code is unreachable), but no warning is generated:

using System;

struct MyValue
{
    private readonly int value;
    public MyValue(int value) { this.value = value; }
    public static bool operator ==(MyValue x, MyValue y) {
        return x.value == y.value;
    }
    public static bool operator !=(MyValue x, MyValue y) {
        return x.value != y.value;
    }
}
class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        int i = 1;
        MyValue v = new MyValue(1);
        if (i == null) { Console.WriteLine("a"); } // warning
        if (v == null) { Console.WriteLine("a"); } // no warning
    }
}

With the IL (for Main) - note everything except the MyValue(1) (which could have side-effects) has been removed:

.method private hidebysig static void Main() cil managed
{
    .entrypoint
    .maxstack 2
    .locals init (
        [0] int32 i,
        [1] valuetype MyValue v)
    L_0000: ldc.i4.1 
    L_0001: stloc.0 
    L_0002: ldloca.s v
    L_0004: ldc.i4.1 
    L_0005: call instance void MyValue::.ctor(int32)
    L_000a: ret 
}

this is basically:

private static void Main()
{
    MyValue v = new MyValue(1);
}
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Someone internally reported this to me recently as well. I do not know why we stopped producing that warning. We've entered it as a bug. –  Eric Lippert Dec 29 '09 at 0:29
    
@Eric - me and Jon raised it a few years ago; I'll try to dig out the e-mail... –  Marc Gravell Dec 29 '09 at 0:35
1  

The fact that a comparison can never be true doesn't mean that it's illegal. Nonetheless, no, a value type can never be null.

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1  
But a value type could be equal to null. Consider int?, which is syntactic sugar for Nullable<Int32>, which is a value type. A variable of type int? could certainly be equal to null. –  Greg Dec 29 '09 at 0:36
1  
@Greg: Yes, it can be equal to null, assuming that the "equal" you're referring to is the result of the == operator. It's important to note that the instance is not actually null, though. –  Adam Robinson Dec 29 '09 at 2:10

No, Int32 x won't ever become null.

If you are comparing an int to null then the comparison operator that takes two int?s is applicable.

"Why a comparison of a value type with null is a warning?" article will help you.

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A value type cannot be null, although it could be equal to null (consider Nullable<>). In your case the int variable and null are implicitly cast to Nullable<Int32> and compared.

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I suspect that your particular test is just being optimized out by the compiler when it generates the IL since the test will never be false.

Side Note: It is possible to have a nullable Int32 use Int32? x instead.

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I guess this is because "==" is a syntax sugar which actually represents call to System.Object.Equals method that accepts System.Object parameter. Null by ECMA specification is a special type which is of course derived from System.Object.

That's why there's only a warning.

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This is not correct, for two reasons. First, == does not have the same semantics as Object.Equals when one of its arguments is a reference type. Second, null is not a type. See section 7.9.6 of the specification if you want to understand how the reference equality operator works. –  Eric Lippert Dec 29 '09 at 0:38
    
"The null literal (§9.4.4.6) evaluates to the null value, which is used to denote a reference not pointing at any object or array, or the absence of a value. The null type has a single value, which is the null value. Hence an expression whose type is the null type can evaluate only to the null value. There is no way to explicitly write the null type and, therefore, no way to use it in a declared type." -- this is quote from ECMA. What are you talking about? Also which version of ECMA do you use? I don't see 7.9.6 in mine. –  Vitaly Dec 31 '09 at 5:01

As per @supercat's clever suggestion in a comment above, the following operator overloads allow you to generate a warning about comparisons of your custom value type to null.

By implementing operators that compare to string, the use of null in a comparison matches the string version of the operator better than the default nullable type version, which in turn lets you generate the warning via the Obsolete attribute.

Until Microsoft gives us back our compiler warning I'm going with this workaround, thanks @supercat!

public struct Foo
{
    private readonly int x;
    public Foo(int x)
    {
        this.x = x;
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return string.Format("Foo {{x={0}}}", x);
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return x.GetHashCode();
    }

    public override bool Equals(Object obj)
    {
        return x.Equals(obj);
    }

    public static bool operator ==(Foo a, Foo b)
    {
        return a.x == b.x;
    }

    public static bool operator !=(Foo a, Foo b)
    {
        return a.x != b.x;
    }

    [Obsolete("The result of the expression is always 'false' since a value of type 'Foo' is never equal to 'null'")]
    public static bool operator ==(Foo a, string b)
    {
        return false;
    }
    [Obsolete("The result of the expression is always 'true' since a value of type 'Foo' is never equal to 'null'")]
    public static bool operator !=(Foo a, string b)
    {
        return true;
    }
    [Obsolete("The result of the expression is always 'false' since a value of type 'Foo' is never equal to 'null'")]
    public static bool operator ==(string a, Foo b)
    {
        return false;
    }
    [Obsolete("The result of the expression is always 'true' since a value of type 'Foo' is never equal to 'null'")]
    public static bool operator !=(string a, Foo b)
    {
        return true;
    }
}
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