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Is there a more concise and idiomatic way to write the following code, which is used to specify default values for optional parameters (in the params/options hash) to a method?

def initialize(params={})
  if params.has_key? :verbose
    @verbose = params[:verbose]
  else
    @verbose = true # this is the  default value
  end
end

I would love to simplify it to something like this:

def initialize(params={})
  @verbose = params[:verbose] or true
end

which almost works, except that you really need to use has_key? :verbose as the condition, instead of just evaluating params[:verbose], in order to cover cases when you want to specify a value of 'false' (i.e. if you want to pass :verbose => false as the argument in this example).

I realize that in this simple example I could easily do:

def initialize(verbose=false)
  @verbose = verbose
end

but, in my real code I actually have a bunch of optional parameters (in addition to a few required ones) and I'd like to put the optional ones in the params hash so that I can easily only specify (by name) the few that I want, rather than having to list them all in order (and potentially having to list ones I don't actually want).

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Perl now has the //= syntax to get around the problem of checking false values in this way. I know it doesn't help for this. That's why it's a comment, not an answer... –  mopoke Dec 29 '09 at 0:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

A common pattern is to use

def foo(options = {})
  options = { :default => :value }.merge(options)
end

You’ll end up with options being a hash containing the passed in values, with the options from your defaults hash as any that weren’t provided.

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Thanks! This works quite well. –  Kelan Dec 29 '09 at 1:21
    
is there a reason to use plain merge over merge! ? (since i presume merge! would be faster) –  banister Dec 29 '09 at 6:14
    
@banister: Using options.merge!(defaults) would do the overwriting in the wrong direction. You need to do defaults.merge(options) to overwrite the default valuess with the specified options. And, since it would be awkward to store the result in 'defaults', you can't use merge! and must instead assign the result back to 'options'. I'm not sure if there is a huge speed difference between merge and merge!. –  Kelan Feb 23 '10 at 23:07
    
@Kelan, what? the code is equivalent to defaults.merge(options) since { :default => :value } is defaults (though inline). If you look at the code you'll see he's using options for both the parameter and the final hash. If you don't believe me, try it out. Using merge! is fine (I just did and it works exactly as you'd expect). –  banister Feb 24 '10 at 11:24
    
@banister: Oh, did you mean to do options = defaults.merge!(options) instead of options = defaults.merge(options)? Yeah, that works fine. I was thinking before that you meant doing just defaults.merge!(options) and not assigning the result back to options... So, I agree either way works. As for performance, based on a little test I just did, using merge! is indeed about 40% faster. So, your presumption was correct. Good call! –  Kelan Feb 24 '10 at 17:59

I think you're looking for this

params = { :verbose => true }.merge(params)
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Another way to write this, more succinctly, would be

def foo(options = {})
    options.reverse_merge! value1: true, value2: 100
end

This set options[:value1] to true (default value) unless options passed in already contains the key :value1. Same for :value2

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Ruby 2.0.0 has a new feature keyword arguments

Previously you had to write such code:

def foo(options = {})
  options = {bar: 'bar'}.merge(options)
  puts "#{options[:bar]} #{options[:buz]}"
end

foo(buz: 'buz') # => 'bar buz'

Now this is much cleaner:

def foo(bar: 'bar', **options)
  puts "#{bar}, #{options}"
end

foo(buz: 'buz') # => 'bar buz'
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