Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

Here's a simple program to explain what I mean. Given a length n, it initializes a sequence of n integers read by standard input.

int n, *seq, *current;
scanf("%d", &n);
seq = malloc(n*sizeof(int));
for (current = seq; current - seq < n; current++)
  scanf("%d", current);

My doubt is about the last increment of current which makes it point to something outside the allocated memory. Obviously it is an error to read from that location. But what if I don't read that location?

The program runs correctly, but my question is: it is a standard and good practice or is it something that may cause troubles and should be avoided?

UPDATE: And what about appending this to the end of the previous program?

for (current--; current - seq >= 0; current--)
  printf("%d\n", *current);

According to @MOHAMED answer it is wrong, not because it is an access to an invalid location, but because the current - seq >= 0 may give wrong results when current points to one location before the first element, thus having an undefined value!

share|improve this question
2  
It's absolutely fine. You can POINT to anything you like. Just don't dereference it unless it's valid! :) It's a bit cleaner if you use an int as your counter, then reference data in seq as seq[counter]. But there's nothing fundamentally wrong with what you're doing –  Baldrick Nov 1 '13 at 8:41
1  
A pointer is just a variable whose type is suitable for holding memory addresses. You should not confuse values and statements. A statement is not allowed to access invalid memory. A value doesn't access anything; it's just a value and doesn't do anything. –  Nikos C. Nov 1 '13 at 8:44
1  
One-past-the-end isn't an invalid location, it's just not a location you're allowed to dereference. Actual invalid values (e.g. dangling or uninitialized pointers) are OK, too, but you must not perform any operations on the pointer itself. –  Kerrek SB Nov 1 '13 at 8:57
    
Sounds unavoidable to me. As soon as the stack frame is generated with space for the auto pointers, the pointers 'exist' and are, as yet, uninitialised and probably point to an invalid location. –  Martin James Nov 1 '13 at 11:06
    
A method to achieve the updated functionality: for (; --current > seq; ) printf("%d\n", *current); –  chux Nov 1 '13 at 12:50
add comment

marked as duplicate by MOHAMED, Joseph Quinsey, abligh, Jonathan Leffler, Elliott Frisch Mar 10 at 4:29

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

From this topic:

Yes, a pointer is permitted to point to the location just past the end of the array. However you aren't permitted to deference such a pointer.

C99 6.5.6/8 Additive operators (emphasis added)

if the expression P points to the last element of an array object, the expression (P)+1 points one past the last element of the array object, and if the expression Q points one past the last element of an array object, the expression (Q)-1 points to the last element of the array object. If both the pointer operand and the result point to elements of the same array object, or one past the last element of the array object, the evaluation shall not produce an overflow; otherwise, the behavior is undefined. If the result points one past the last element of the array object, it shall not be used as the operand of a unary * operator that is evaluated.

Concerning your UPDATE

And according to this topic:

The comparison current - seq >= 0 is undefined behavior in your case: current - seq becomes undefined when current is decremented after the iteration when it is equal to seq.

This is covered by section 6.5.6 of the standard, part 8:

When an expression that has integer type is added to or subtracted from a pointer, the result has the type of the pointer operand. If the pointer operand points to an element of an array object, and the array is large enough, the result points to an element offset from the original element such that the difference of the subscripts of the resulting and original array elements equals the integer expression. In other words, if the expression P points to the i-th element of an array object, the expressions (P)+N (equivalently, N+(P)) and (P)-N (where N has the value n) point to, respectively, the i+n-th and i−n-th elements of the array object, provided they exist. Moreover, if the expression P points to the last element of an array object, the expression (P)+1 points one past the last element of the array object, and if the expression Q points one past the last element of an array object, the expression (Q)-1 points to the last element of the array object. If both the pointer operand and the result point to elements of the same array object, or one past the last element of the array object, the evaluation shall not produce an overflow; otherwise, the behavior is undefined. If the result points one past the last element of the array object, it shall not be used as the operand of a unary * operator that is evaluated.

The standard goes length to cover the element at the position one past the last element of the array object, while the element at the position one prior the first element falls under the "otherwise" clause of the above rule.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I have updated my question according to your answer. –  collimarco Nov 1 '13 at 9:18
    
@collimarco I updated my answer according to your update –  MOHAMED Nov 1 '13 at 9:24
add comment

If you don't use the pointer again (unless you reassign it) then it's okay.

Just having a pointer doesn't cause undefined behavior, it's when and how you use it that can cause problems. So if you don't use it nothing will happen.

share|improve this answer
2  
It's better than that, though: You can do pointer arithmetic with the one-past-the-end pointer. It's quite a nice pointer. –  Kerrek SB Nov 1 '13 at 8:58
    
Adding to create a one-past-the-end pointer is supported by the C standard. Creating other pointers outside an array is not. –  Eric Postpischil Nov 1 '13 at 12:59
add comment

It's fine, but the following is probably clearer and less error prone:

int n, *seq, counter;
scanf("%d", &n);
seq = malloc(n*sizeof(int));
for (counter = 0; counter < n; counter++)
  scanf("%d", &seq[counter]);
share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.