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I'm currently looking into different patterns for building classes in JavaScript. But no matther what pattern I see, there are still some things I am not really sure about.

var ItemManager = (function()
{
    var p = function()
    {
        this.items= [];
    };

    p.prototype.addItem = function(item)
    {
        var self = this;    
        self.items.push(item);
    };

    return p;
}());

I create the simple class ItemManager, this class got the function addItem for adding any item to the collection. Now I don't really want the variable items, which represents the collection, to be public, this variable should be private, but I don't see any possible way to use a prototyped method to access private variables.

So what's the best practice in this case? Simply don't use private variables?

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4  
Obligatory there are no classes in js call –  rlemon Nov 1 '13 at 11:07
    
take a look at stackoverflow.com/q/436120/1117720 –  Amine Hajyoussef Nov 1 '13 at 11:32

3 Answers 3

var ItemManager = function() {
    var items = [];

    return {
           addItem : function(item) {   
               items.push(item);
           },
           removeItem : function() {
                return items.pop();
           }
     }
};

var myItemManager = new ItemManager();

items variable becomes hidden after the execution of ItemManager function, but addItem and removeItem still share the access to items. See the Douglas Crockford's article on private variables in JavaScript for further investigation.

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1  
This works, but would fail instanceof check: ideone.com/b9hgi4 –  Passerby Nov 1 '13 at 11:23
    
In addition to the comment above: this would create a new set of anonymous functions (assigned to addItem and removeItem properties) for every separated object. –  zerkms Nov 1 '13 at 11:25
    
@Passerby yeah, I see it... I'll try to find out why. thanks for your comment. –  aga Nov 1 '13 at 11:25
    
@aga: that's easy - because on every constructor call you're returning a new object –  zerkms Nov 1 '13 at 11:25
1  
@aga: because you're creating an instance of Array type object. Check stackoverflow.com/a/1978474/251311 for details –  zerkms Nov 1 '13 at 11:29

Variables defined within the encapsulation will be inaccessible from outside, but will be usable within the scope of the encapsulation.

var ItemManager = (function()
{
    var _lastItem; // private field

    var p = function()
    {
        this.items= [];
    };

    p.prototype.addItem = function(item)
    {
        var self = this;    
        self.items.push(item);
        _lastItem = item;
    };

    p.prototype.lastItem = function() {
        return _lastItem;
    };

    return p;
}());

console.log(itemManager._lastItem); // undefined
console.log(itemManager.lastItem()); // prints last item to console.
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2  
OP returns a constructor, so presumably it will be used to construct new objects like var newManager = new itemManager();. If my guess is correct - your advice won't work. –  zerkms Nov 1 '13 at 11:15
2  
Your _lastItem will be "static": ideone.com/OlDM9K –  Passerby Nov 1 '13 at 11:17
    
As zerkms said, this unfortunately will not work, since _lastItem is a static variable. So it would only work if I had only one single instance of a class. –  GoldenerAal Nov 1 '13 at 11:31

as GoldenerAal mentioned, they are not called classes, but functions you have

var ItemManager = function (){
..
...
...

};

you could have:

function ItemManager(){
this.items = [];

function addItem(item){
...
};
};

you can then create an instance of ItemManager, only when you need to :

var itemManager = new ItemManager();
itemManager.addItem(<something here>);

http://javascript.crockford.com/private.html variables inside a function only have the scope of that function, that variable is not a global variable (static variable).

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