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I was wondering what's the best practice for class initialization.

One can write:

private myClass mc = new myClass();

Or:

private myClass mc { get; set; }

public Foo()
{
    mc = new myClass();
}

I always tend to use it as a field. Are there any downsides for using a class as a property ? I did some searching on google but none of the results gave me a good answer for this specific question.

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possible duplicate of Difference between Property and Field in C# 3.0+ –  Kami Nov 1 '13 at 11:13
    
A third option is that you can write private myClass mc; public Foo() { mc = new myClass(); } –  dav_i Nov 1 '13 at 11:23
1  
This is not a duplicate. –  David Arno Nov 1 '13 at 11:23

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If it's private, there's no significant benefit in making it a property. I'd just keep it as a field. I use properties as a way of communicating an API with other classes.

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I missed the fact that the property was private as I've never seen anyone do that before. There is definitely no benefits to private properties. –  David Arno Nov 1 '13 at 11:16
    
@DavidArno I deliberately set them to private, because I wanted to know how class initialization should be done in a class itself. According to the answers, i'll just stick around with the field way :) –  DeMama Nov 1 '13 at 11:24
    
@DeMama Good for you :) –  David Arno Nov 1 '13 at 11:26
    
I'd make it a property if there was some logic, even internal to the class, which should be isolated to the property. For auto-implemented properties, however, I agree that there's really no tangible benefit. –  David Nov 1 '13 at 12:11

Your use of a property in the second example is unnecessary. You could write it as:

private myClass mc;

public Foo()
{
    mc = new myClass();
}
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Properties are meant to be getters/setters, which means they provide a part of the mechanism for information hiding. Making them private doesn't do much, as all methods from the class can see private members.

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I perefer the first way:

private myClass mc = new myClass();

because:

  • private properties has no benefit.
  • If you create another constructor, you duplicate the initialization code unless you create some Init method or call this(), which is not as clear as simply initialization the field.
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